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May 15, 2019
338: How to Start Thinking About Improving the Healthcare System
Today Anna joins me today to discuss the processes behind healthcare delivery. We talk about why process improvement matters and what you can do to learn about it!
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39 min
May 8, 2019
337: How to Overcome Test Anxiety and Take Back Control
Dr. Puder is a psychiatrist who joins me today to discuss test anxiety and ways to combat test anxiety. Listen in to make sure you always test your best!
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38 min
May 1, 2019
336: How to Ace the MCAT Psych/Soc Section & Improve Your Memory
Phil is a top tutor at Next Step Test Prep and has personally performed well on the old and new MCAT. Today he shares his strategies for studying for Psych/Soc.
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46 min
April 24, 2019
335: Rebounding From Two Low MCAT Scores to Gain an Acceptance
Austin didn't have perfect grades, had two low MCAT scores, and gained an acceptance. I always say that you do not need to be perfect, Austin exemplifies that.
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38 min
April 17, 2019
334: What to Be Prepared to Discuss in the Med School Interview
When you walk into your medical school interview, if you're not prepared for specific types of questions, it may throw you off completely. Let's talk about them!
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21 min
April 10, 2019
333: From Canada to the Caribbean to the US: This MD's Journey
Emma is Canadian, played D1 basketball in the US, and then went to Ross for medical school. She takes us through her journey and shares helpful tips for Canadian students!
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46 min
April 3, 2019
332: 5 Biggest Mistakes Students Make During an MMI Interview
The medical school multiple mini interview lessons subjectivity during the interview day, but make sure you don't make these mistakes during your MMI!
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23 min
March 27, 2019
331: 4 Things You Need to Do Now to Prepare For Your Applications
Whether you're applying to medical school this year, or later, we're going to discuss what you should be doing to help your medical school applications.
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26 min
March 20, 2019
330: Getting into Med School after a Community College Postbac
David had to take do postbac at a community college to be able to work full-time. He was asked why, but he was still able to receive multiple acceptances.
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32 min
March 13, 2019
329: Premed 101: Motivation Overload—My Talk from AMSA 2019
I had the awesome privilege to talk at the 2019 AMSA Convention to an awesome group of premed students. I wanted to share the encouragement with all of you.
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52 min
March 6, 2019
328: This Student Was Her Own Advocate and Earned Two Acceptances
Janet is a nurse who switched to the premed path a few years ago. Listen to how she overcame a 499 on the MCAT and advocated for herself during the app process!
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43 min
February 27, 2019
327: From College Athlete to Accepted Medical Student
Jeff was an accomplished college athlete, but struggled to gain an acceptance to medical school his first two times. Listen to how he finally found success!
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44 min
February 20, 2019
326: How Reapplying to Med School was Successful for this Student
Amanda had to apply to med school twice. We talk about her premed path, her first application, her struggles, and how she succeeded and received 3 acceptances.
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37 min
February 13, 2019
325: How Do International Medical Graduates Practice in the US?
When you go to an international med school, including the Caribbean, there are many steps you must take to practice in the US, including going through ECFMG.
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30 min
February 6, 2019
324: Free Summer Programs for Premed Students through SHPEP
SHPEP, or the Summer Health Professions Education Program, is a free summer program for underrepresented premed students at twelve locations throughout the US.
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34 min
January 30, 2019
323: From Premed to Physical Therapy School—Back to Premed
Madeleine struggled early & got some bad advising which caused her to doubt her abilities to get to medical school. A pivot to physical therapy didn't work out.
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38 min
January 23, 2019
322: What to Write About In the Personal Statement and More Q&A
The personal statement is such an important part of the application, yet many students don't respect it enough. Today, I'm taking your questions about it.
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30 min
January 16, 2019
321: Premed Q&A: All of Your Instagram Questions Answered!
We had a ton of questions come in from you on Instagram, covering letters of rec, shadowing, research, and so much more. Follow me on IG—I'm @medicalschoolhq.
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39 min
January 9, 2019
320: From Military Special Operations to Med School Acceptances
Justin is a former military special operations medic who grew a stronger fascination with taking care of patients. Now he has multiple acceptances to med school.
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40 min
January 2, 2019
319: Disclosing a DUI Didn't Hold Him Back from Med School
Matt is a premed with multiple acceptances to med school, even with a big red flag on his application—a DUI. Learn what happened and how he talked about it.
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34 min
December 26, 2018
318: The Pros and Cons of Global Healthcare Experiences
Lawson is the executive director at Atlantis, a leading global healthcare experience fellowship that gives you the chance to explore other healthcare systems.
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38 min
December 19, 2018
317: Building Better Study Skills for the Sciences and MCAT
Kathleen is an expert in helping premeds and medical students better prepare for their exams. With her evidenced-based practice, she'll help you too.
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45 min
December 12, 2018
316: Premed Q&A: Pregnancy, Canadian Students, and Much More
I reached out to our amazing premed community in the Premed Hangout Facebook group and got on the phone with several of them to answer their questions!
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32 min
December 5, 2018
315: When Should I Give Up On My Medical School Application?
The medical school application is a long and grueling process. If you've been rejected, haven't heard anything, or are confused, listen to this podcast episode!
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27 min
November 28, 2018
314: Jackie Shares Her Path from Community College to Med School
Jackie is jackieplans on Instagram. She has a following watching her journey through medical school as she creates beautiful notes that you can buy.
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58 min
November 21, 2018
313: Army Vet, Mom of 3, Wanted to Quit During Her MD/PHD Journey
Adrienne is in her 3rd year of her MD/PhD program and things are getting easier. She's the mom of 3, a Vet, and an amazing example of striving for your dreams.
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46 min
November 14, 2018
312: He Got Into Medical School and Didn't Have to take the MCAT!
Dan, from FutureMDlife on Instagram, joined me to talk about his journey and struggles on his path to medical school as well as his Instagram journey.
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32 min
November 7, 2018
311: Common Misconceptions about the MCAT and a New Tool from EK
Examkrackers Janis Stott joined me to talk about the common misconceptions she sees from students about the MCAT. We also talk about EKs new MCAT Hotline.
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49 min
October 31, 2018
310: Improve Your CARS Score with the MCAT CARS Podcast!
Jack Westin was featured in Session 259 almost one year ago. Now we've launched the MCAT CARS Podcast and it's going to change the way you prep for the MCAT.
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35 min
October 24, 2018
309: 5 Medical School Interview Questions Premeds Struggle With
The medical school interview can make or break your chance at an acceptance. Don't walk in unprepared. Check out these questions that students struggle with.
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30 min
October 17, 2018
308: The One Thing You Need to do to Stand Out as a Premed!
Listen up premeds! I talk about this a lot, but I need to have a dedicated show on this. You have to be yourself in your med school applications and interviews.
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21 min
October 10, 2018
307: Moving Forward with Student Doctor Network and It's Founder
Dr. Lee Burnett founded SDN to connect students. Little did he know how big it would get, and how negative the internet would turn. He's hoping to change that.
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60 min
October 3, 2018
306: Introduction to Premed Diaries: Helping Premeds with Burnout
The very first episode of Premed Diaries, a podcast dedicated to you. With Dr. Allison Gray as the host, you are the featured guest by calling 833-MY-DIARY.
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21 min
September 26, 2018
305: Instagram Q&A: Deferring, Nursing Majors, LORs and More!
I had so much fun the last time we did an Instagram Q&A, that I decided to bring it back! We had a ton of great questions, and hopefully some good answers!
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16 min
September 19, 2018
304: How to Choose a Medical School & Put Together a School List
This will hopefully be the most in-depth look at what medical schools you should apply to. Putting together your school list is an important part of your app.
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53 min
September 12, 2018
303: How Can I Prepare for the CASPer, What is CASPer and More
Ryan is joined by Dr. Kelly Dore who is one of the brilliant minds who developed and researched CASPer. We talk about what it is, how it's scored and more.
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48 min
September 5, 2018
302: Instagram Q&A: HPSP, Picking Med Schools, SMPs and Postbacs
I asked on Instagram (@medicalschoolhq - follow me!) for questions for this episode. You did not disappoint! Check out the episode for some great questions!
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26 min
August 29, 2018
301: Near-death Experience Led This Physician to Help People Die
BJ Miller is a hospice and palliative care specialist at UCSF. A near-death experience as a teenager left him with a unique perspective on disability and death.
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51 min
August 22, 2018
300: Burnout in Medicine and Our Newest Project to Help With It!
Ryan is joined by Allison who has previously shared her story of burnout. They discuss burnout and they talk about MedDiaries—their newest project to help.
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19 min
August 15, 2018
299: High School Dropout to Highest Ranking Physician in the US
Dr. Richard Carmona served as the 17th Surgeon General of the US. After being a high school dropout and special forces medic, he found his calling for medicine.
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52 min
August 8, 2018
298: Professor to Premed, How Indentifing as LGBT Affected Apps
Sarah is starting med school this fall and is excited to begin. Listen to her story and how identifying as LGBT affected her med school applications.
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41 min
August 1, 2018
297: What If You've Applied and Your MCAT Score Is Not Good?
If you've not taken my advice and pushed your MCAT back until June or July, you may be in for a rude awakening when you see your score. What should you do?
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20 min
July 25, 2018
296: What are Med School Red Flags & How Do You Talk About Them?
Red flags seem to confuse a lot of students. They come up in applications and interviews and you need to be prepared to talk about them. Listen to this episode!
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37 min
July 18, 2018
295: Ignoring Advice, He Disclosed His Bipolar Disorder in Apps
Logan Noone is an MSII at PNWU. He became discouraged after listening to a previous Premed Years podcast about not disclosing big red flags. He ignored me!
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46 min
July 11, 2018
294: Premed Hangout Q&A: Interviews, Mistakes, and Much More!
For today's episode, we took a handful of questions that students asked in our Facebook group, the Premed Hangout. We cover a variety of topics. Join now!
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23 min
July 4, 2018
293: Can You be an Alcoholic and Still Get Into Medical School?
Michael joined me to talk about his struggle with alcohol since middle school, his failed, first application cycle, and what he did to succeed the second time.
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44 min
June 27, 2018
292: President of His Caribbean Med School Class to Failed Match
Dr. Yousuf is starting his Emergency Medicine residency after failing to match. Learn from his failures and triumphs and how you can avoid similar mistakes.
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39 min
June 20, 2018
291: Dr. Buck Parker: Academic Struggles to an 'A' Student
Dr. Buck Parker shares his journey of struggling during undergrad to success in medical school and his new course, Secret Study Hacks. Listen to his journey.
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39 min
June 13, 2018
290: How Do You Focus on Your Health While a Premed Student?
Caroline is a second-year med student who runs the @carolinecooksclean Instagram account. As a former athlete, she tries her best to stay on top of her health.
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31 min
June 6, 2018
289: Stop Wasting Space in Your Personal Statement and ECs
After reading hundreds of personal statements and extracurriculars this application cycle, I'm seeing the same mistakes over and over again. Don't do it too!
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33 min
May 30, 2018
288: This is How UICOM Reviews Your Medical School Application
Leila Amiri is the Director of the Office of Medical College Admissions at UICOM. We go step by step through the admissions process at her medical school.
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67 min
May 23, 2018
287: This Student, and Dad, Overcame a Poor GPA to Get Accepted
Nick is a former premed student-athlete who didn't do well in school and went into business. Now he's accepted to medical school after fixing his GPA.
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38 min
May 16, 2018
286: Common Mistakes and More About Financing Medical School
Travis Hornsby went from trading bonds to figuring out how to pay off his wives med school loans as fast as possible. Now he makes it easy for every student.
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33 min
May 9, 2018
285: Hear How This Immigrant Got An Acceptance to an Ivy League!
Fernando immigrated from Brazil and has been on the long, slow road to medical school. After some experiences in the LGBT community, he needed to be a physician.
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55 min
May 2, 2018
284: What Do You Need to Do When Med School Applications Open?
When this podcast goes out, the medical school application cycle for students wanting to start medical school in 2019 is opening. What do you need to do now?
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29 min
April 25, 2018
283: Common Questions Premeds Have About Osteopathic Medicine
This week I'm joined by Dr. William Mayo, President-elect of the AOA. We have a great discussion about the ACGME and AOA/AACOM merger and more.
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41 min
April 18, 2018
282: Premed Q&A Coaching Calls - HPSP, Clincal Experience & More
I decided to get on the phone with premed students and answer their questions about relationships, HPSP, secondary essays and so much more! Take a listen!
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30 min
April 11, 2018
281: What Does the Med School Application Timeline Look Like?
When should you start writing your personal statement, your extracurriculars, taking the MCAT, asking for letters of rec and more application timelines?
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24 min
April 4, 2018
280: Finishing Prereqs Early, Nursing as a Backup and More Q&A!
This week we're taking questions directly from the MSHQ Premed Forums. If you're not familiar with the forums, check them out and join the conversation!
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21 min
March 28, 2018
279: From a Cocktail Waitress to Physician and EM Doc
Dr. Elaine Reno is an Emergency Medicine physician. She joins us to talk about her journey to medicine and her role with the Wilderness Medicine program at CU.
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35 min
March 21, 2018
278: Your MCAT and GPA Don't Matter As Much as You Think They Do
You shouldn't be surprised to read online that a student with near perfect stats didn't get an interview invite or acceptance. You're more than your stats.
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25 min
March 14, 2018
277: This Student Didn't Let Her Fear Overcome Her
Holly initially didn't think she could become a physician and let her fears dictate her path. She then conquered her fears and has been successful.
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44 min
March 7, 2018
276: Q&A From the Premed Hangout Facebook Group
Today we're talking MD vs PA, DO shadowing, physician letters of recommendation and other questions premed students have asked in the Hangout!
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27 min
February 28, 2018
275: From Nursing to Accepted Premed, A Story of Lost Confidence
Ayesha is a successful applicant to med school after she initially lost confidence due to poor grades and became a nurse instead. Her dream never left her.
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37 min
February 21, 2018
274: 5 Common Mistakes Premeds Make with Extracurriculars
From taking on too much, to not doing enough, we'll talk about what you can do to avoid the common mistakes premeds make with their extracurriculars.
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26 min
February 14, 2018
273: Let's Talk About Osteopathic Docs and What You Need to Know
Dr. Daniel Clearfield is a Family and Sports Medicine trained OMT doc. We talked about his journey to DO school, some struggles that DOs have and much more.
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34 min
February 7, 2018
272: How to Start Brainstorming Your Personal Statement Draft?
Writing your personal statement is hard. Where do you start? What do you write about? Check out the Guide to the Medical School Personal Statement preorders!
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30 min
January 31, 2018
271: Don't Talk About How You Know What Being a Doctor is Like
Allison and Ryan talk about a subject that came up in the Premed Hangout Facebook Group about students talking about what it's like being a physician.
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25 min
January 24, 2018
270: From the Oil Fields and Poor Grades to an SMP and Acceptance
Jonathan is a medical student who landed his dream school after struggling as a premed and working in the oil fields. Hear his journey on today's podcast.
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46 min
January 17, 2018
269: This Physician Talks About Imposter Syndrome and Her Journey
Dr. Danielle Jones is @mamadoctorjones on Instagram. I read her blog post about imposter syndrome, something a lot of premeds struggle with, and wanted to talk.
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37 min
January 10, 2018
268: This Nurse Practitioner is on His Way to Medical School
Matt has been accepted to multiple med school after realizing that he wanted to do more with and for patients. After working as an NP, he's starting med school.
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34 min
January 3, 2018
267: First Year Med Student, med_kat28, Talks about Her Journey
Katherine is a first-year med student and popular premed Instagrammer. We talk about her struggles, social media for premeds and more. Take a listen & subscribe.
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41 min
December 27, 2017
266: From the Military to Medical School with an Upward Trend
Dylan is a first-year med student after being an EOD tech in the Army for 8 years. After figuring out what he wanted to do, he made it happen with hard work.
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50 min
December 20, 2017
265: Learn How to Better Retain Information with a Memory Master
Luis Angel was a Memory Master Champion on FOX's Superhuman Show. We talk about how you can learn to retain more information to improve your grades!
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43 min
December 13, 2017
264: Dean of MSUCOM Talks About Mission to Increase Canadian DOs
Dean Strampel from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine joined us to talk about his school and what they are doing for Canadian premeds.
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38 min
December 6, 2017
263: He Figured Out How to Overcome His 2.75 Undergrad GPA
Michael struggled through his undergrad with a 2.75 GPA and realized afterward that he wanted to be a physician. Listen to his journey and what he learned.
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41 min
November 29, 2017
262: The Physician Behind #LifeofaMedStudent Shares His Journey
Charles is the founder of #LifeofaMedStudent. Take a listen to learn why he started it, and what you can learn from the med students talking about their life.
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33 min
November 22, 2017
261: From a 2.7 Undergrad GPA to First Year Medical Student
Nneka is a 1st year med student who didn't think she had a chance. After a 2.7 UG GPA, poor MCAT scores and a failed application, learn what she did to succeed.
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47 min
November 15, 2017
260: This Doc Is Proving You Don't Have to Follow the Rules
Dr. McDermott is a psychiatrist in private practice who is doing things differently. Listen to her story and see what you can do differently on your journey.
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28 min
November 8, 2017
259: How Can I Improve My CARS Section Score on the MCAT?
CARS (Critical Analysis and Reasoning) on the MCAT seems to give students the most trouble. Jack from JackWestin.com is here to help you score higher!
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43 min
November 1, 2017
258: Director of Admissions Talks About the Admissions Process
Stephanie Petrosky, Director of Admissions at NSUDKCPCOM (formally referred to as Nova) joined me to talk about how her team reviews med school applications
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56 min
October 25, 2017
257: Author of Med School Uncensored Talks About his Journey
Dr. Richard Beddingfield is a cardiothoracic anesthesiologist and author of Med School Uncensored. We talk about his journey and what he learned along the way.
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48 min
October 18, 2017
256: A Look at Carle Illinois College of Medicine with Dean Li
Carle Illinois is hoping to change the way medicine is taught, focusing on engineering and medicine together. This is our discussion with the dean, Dr. King Li
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48 min
October 12, 2017
255: Q&A With Premed Students at a Small Liberal Arts School
In this Q&A we talk HPSP, shadowing, clinical experiences, mistakes I made on my journey and so much more. Want me to talk with your club? Let me know!
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40 min
October 4, 2017
254: MD vs PA! Let's Talk About it with a PA to Help You Decide
Savanna Perry is a PA who helps pre-PA students get into PA school? Sound familiar? We chat to discuss the differences in the career field to help you decide!
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57 min
September 27, 2017
253: Almost Everything You Need to Know About Postbac Programs
Dr. Glenn Cummings is the Director of the Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program at Bryn Mawr. We discuss mistakes students make and so much more about postbacs.
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44 min
September 20, 2017
252: Navigating the Premed and Med School Path with ADHD
David is a former member of the military and current med student. We discuss his journey with ADHD, PTSD and what made him successful getting into med school.
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35 min
September 13, 2017
251: How to Protect Your Relationships as a Premed and Med Student
Sarah Epstein is a Marriage and Family Therapist and author of Love in the Time of Medical School. We talk about how you can keep your relationships strong.
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46 min
September 6, 2017
250: The Extreme Burden of Being a Physician (It's worth it)
With Houston still feeling the effects of Hurricane Harvey, and Hurricane Irma gunning towards Florida, how can we help and learn from those on the ground?
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46 min
August 30, 2017
249: This Physician Wants to Change The Narrative Around Death
Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider is a Hospitalist turned evangelist for Palliative Care. Learn what you can be doing now to help patients in their most critical times.
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45 min
August 23, 2017
248: From Premed to Attending Physician - Showing You the Path
Have you ever wondered what the whole path to becoming a doc looks like? Ryan breaks down every step of the premed & med student journey to give you an idea!
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38 min
August 16, 2017
247: Do You Need an MD(DO)/PhD to do Research as a Physician?
Dr. Maureen Leonard discusses her journey to medicine and her life as a physician scientist, working 70-80% of her time doing research with "just" an MD.
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49 min
August 9, 2017
246: Ask Dr. Gray, Premed Q&A - Lots of Great Questions Answered
Dr. Gray answers several voicemails, as well as questions sent in during the Facebook Live. The Facebook Live videos will be a new podcast coming soon!
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41 min
August 2, 2017
245: Why Does Texas Have It's Own App and More TMDSAS Questions
This week Dr. Gray got the chance to speak to the executive director of the TMDSAS, Dr. Scott Wright. We got behind the scenes at the TMDSAS for you!
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44 min
July 26, 2017
244: Entrepreneurial Premed Stands Out For the Ivys
Prerak is a premed student who is about to start medical school at Yale after a successful undergrad at Berkeley. Listen to his story and check out his YouTube.
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37 min
July 19, 2017
243: A Burnout Story and What You Can Do to Avoid It
Allison joins us to talk about her experience with burnout during residency and we talk about how you can hopefully cope during a stressful time.
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21 min
July 12, 2017
242: Secondary Essay Common Mistakes and How to Avoid Them
Once you submit your primary application, the work isn't over, secondary essays are still a huge part of your medical school application. Listen to the show!
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15 min
July 5, 2017
241: Third Application Cycle was a Charm for this Premed!
Many students would have given up, but Natalie didn't. She took each obstacle and learned from it, ultimately gaining acceptance to six medical schools.
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51 min
June 28, 2017
240: Premed Q&A: MCAT Timing, Shadowing, ECs and More!
Ryan jumped on a Facebook Live and answered your questions live. Check out the great questions that came in. Join us at http://medicalschoolhq.net/group
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45 min
June 21, 2017
239: Chasing After People in Scrubs to Get the Info You Need!
Dr. Andrea Tooley shares her journey from premed to current Optho resident. She didn't know a lot about the premed journey, but fought to inform herself.
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41 min
June 14, 2017
238: Is the Role of Your Premed Advisor to Tell You No?
Ryan and Allison discuss something that came up with one of the students Ryan is helping. Should your premed advisor tell you that you can't or shouldn't apply?
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27 min
June 7, 2017
237: AMCAS, AACOMAS, MCAT Motivation and Other Premed Q&A
Allison and Ryan tackle several questions from the Hangout, our private Facebook group. We cover everything from motivation to residency status. Check it out!
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30 min
May 31, 2017
236: What Do The First Two Years of Medical School Look Like?
Allison is back! It's double Dr. Gray for today's episode about medical school. We talked about our experiences during the first two years of medical school.
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35 min
May 24, 2017
235: Interview Prep: What is Happening in Our Healthcare System?
Jen Briney is host of the Congressional Dish podcast and joins me today to talk about our current healthcare system and where it may be headed.
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42 min
May 17, 2017
234: ICU Nurse Turned Medical Student Discusses Her Journey
Sarah is a current 3rd-year medical student and former CTICU nurse who now wants to be a Cardiothoracic Surgeon! Listen to her journey and how others reacted.
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47 min
May 10, 2017
233 : 5 Common Med School Interview Questions and How to Answer Them
The medical school interview process is filled with fear and doubt. Take a listen to hear 5 common questions and learn how to answer them so you're prepared.
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26 min
May 3, 2017
232: Struggling to Choose a Specialty, He Started Podcasting
Ian is a 4th year med student who didn't know what he wanted to do when he grew up, so he created a podcast to help him and others with the same struggles.
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42 min
April 26, 2017
231: How to Prepare For Your Medical School Interview
There are many ways to prepare for the medical school interview. Unfortunately, many students don't do any of these. Take a listen and go in ahead of the game!
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28 min
April 19, 2017
230: Rejected From the Caribbean! Now with a US Acceptance!
Chad shares his story about struggling with undergrad as he needed to work, being rejected from Caribbean medical school and his recent application success.
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46 min
April 12, 2017
229: 54-year-old Med Student Overcame 5 MCATs, Rejection and More
Renee is a former Nurse Educator turned medical student. Always wanting to be a physician, she battled through poor MCAT scores, a failed application and more.
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41 min
April 5, 2017
228 : Maintaining Confidence Through the Grueling App Process
Mariah has spent years on the Hill helping lobby for those without a voice. Now, she wants to be a physician. Hear her story of self-doubt and how she overcame!
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60 min
March 29, 2017
227: Time Management for a NASCAR Driving Medical Student
Patrick Staropoli is a fourth-year medical student who happens to drive 200 mph on certain weekends racing in NASCAR. We chatted about how he manages it all.
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34 min
March 22, 2017
226: Why You Should Still Consider a Career in Medicine
Dr. Shikha Jain joins us to discuss the powerful piece she wrote on KevinMD about why she would still encourage her daughter to go into medicine.
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45 min
March 15, 2017
225: Common Questions for Premeds About Osteopathic Medicine
Rachel, the Junior National Pre-Soma Director shares her journey to medical school and answers common questions she receives from premeds about DO school.
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52 min
March 8, 2017
224: Teen Mom to Physician, Starting Med School with 3 Children
Dr. Lopez shares her journey from rough childhood to becoming a physician. Starting her premed path after having 3 children, she has fulfilled her dream.
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33 min
March 1, 2017
223: Setting Yourself Up for Financial Success, Starting Now
Dr. Dahle is an EM physician and publisher of WhiteCoatInvestor.com. He has taken on the task of improving the financial literacy of those entering medicine.
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43 min
February 22, 2017
222: Working Full-time and Taking Many Years to Finish Premed
Zane shares her story of taking some gap years before college to fulfill her dream of being a flying trapeze artist. Her unique path led to her application success.
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43 min
February 15, 2017
221: Leaving West Africa to Fulfill a Dream of Being a Physician
Akosua is starting medical school soon after successfully reapplying. Her dreams started in Ghana and she shares her journey with us on the podcast.
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43 min
February 8, 2017
220: From Caribbean Med School to a US Dermatology Residency
Dr. Hure is a Caribbean medical school grad who went on to complete a Derm residency in the US. Here her advice for those thinking about offshore med schools.
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54 min
February 1, 2017
219: How to Improve the Path for Women in Medicine
Dr. Jean Robey is passionate about women in medicine. As a practicing nephrologist, she is now very involved with Physician Moms Group. We celebrate #NWPD.
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62 min
January 25, 2017
218: This Nontrad Overcame More Obstacles Than Anyone I Know
Ana Jimenez is a medical student at KU with an extraordinary path to med school. As a nontraditional student she overcame many obstacles to realize her dream.
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78 min
January 18, 2017
217: How are Med Schools Looking At Your New MCAT Score?
Kaplan Executive Director of Pre-Health Programs joined me to talk about Kaplan's new survey and so much more about the new MCAT and what they have to offer.
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46 min
January 11, 2017
216: What You Need to Know About AACOM Killing Grade Replacement
Starting May 1st, 2017 AACOM has announced that the grade replacement policy will no longer exist. All grades will count towards your GPA. Listen to hear more.
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29 min
January 4, 2017
215: Why Do You Want to be a Doctor? You Need to Know This!
I work with many students for mock interview prep and too many of them can't clearly answer why they want to be a physician. You need to know your story.sss
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27 min
December 28, 2016
214: 5 Things Premed Need to Think About for the New Year
Whether you are just starting out on your journey, or ready to apply this coming year, there are things that you should keep in mind for the new year.
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28 min
December 21, 2016
213: Stop Looking For a Backup Plan, It's Hurting Your Chances
Prompted from a post in our Facebook group, I wanted to tell you why I think having a backup plan for medical school is a bad idea. Backed by science of course!
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29 min
December 14, 2016
212: The Specialty Stories Podcast is Live!
Dr. Hure is a Caribbean medical school grad who went on to complete a Dermatology residency and Dermatopathology fellowship. Hear her specialty story.
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40 min
December 7, 2016
211: Medical School For International Students and More Q&A
A voicemail was sent in asking a question about international students getting accepted to medical school. I answer that and other premed questions.
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26 min
November 30, 2016
210: Start Your Medical School Application Prep Now!
There are so many moving pieces to the medical school application. The most common mistake is waiting too long to start it. Don't be the one who misses out!
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26 min
November 23, 2016
209: Taking a Gap Year Before Medical School? Should You Do It?
Ryan answers two emails that came in on the same day about gap years and decided to dig into what it is and the pros and cons of taking one. Check it out!
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27 min
November 16, 2016
208: What is The Future of Medicine and Should it Matter to You?
Allison and Ryan discuss the recent election results and whether or not it should affect your decision to apply to medical school. Oh, and we celebrate 4 years!
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39 min
November 9, 2016
207: This Med Student Took a Leave of Absense and started Osmosis
Shiv Gaglani started medical school knowing he was interested in business. Two years later, he co-founded Osmosis and is now making an impact in the world.
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40 min
November 2, 2016
206: What Kind of Physician Do You Want to be? Recorded Live!
Recorded live at the AMSA PremedFest conference at USF and the UC Davis Pre-Health conference, listen to what students are thinking about for a specialty.
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37 min
October 26, 2016
205: Why She Left the Premed Track, Became an NP and is now an M1
Ryan talked to Hanaan about why her lack of mentorship as a premed, switching to an NP program and then figuring out that she truly wants to be a physician.
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36 min
October 19, 2016
204: What I Wish Every Premed Student Would Know
Ryan talked about some of the most common questions that he answers for premed students, as well as common mistakes premed students make. Hear them now!
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31 min
October 12, 2016
203: Premed Q&A - Maximizing Gap Years, Residency Merger and More
Ryan answers questions that have come in through our Facebook group, and email. We cover a lot of different topics, so there will be something for you.
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23 min
October 5, 2016
202: Gain Experience Through Premed Wilderness Medicine Programs
Todd Miner joins Ryan to talk about how the Wilderness Medicine program at the University of Colorado SoM is helping premeds get exposure to medicine.
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35 min
September 28, 2016
201: How The Founder of PMG, Dr. Sabry, is Changing the World
Dr. Sabry started Physician Moms Group to help herself through tough times. What came out of it is something special. With 60+k members, PMG is making waves.
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48 min
September 21, 2016
200: What is coming next for the Medical School Headquarters
200 Episodes and almost 1,000,000 downloads. You've been there for us, and I hope that we've been there for you on your journey to medical school.
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22 min
September 14, 2016
199: The Short Coat Podcast Visits the Premed Years
The Short Coat Podcast is from the students at Iowa's Carver College of Medicine. After talking to them, I think every med school should have a podcast!
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48 min
September 7, 2016
198: Finding a Masters Program Postbac to Fix Early Mistakes
Anje'le is a current medical student who used an often overlooked aspect of postbac programs - linkage. She used the linkage to earn her a spot in medical school.
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38 min
August 31, 2016
197: Can You Become a Doctor If You've Been Arrested?
Larry Cohen is a lawyer who works a lot with healthcare workers who find themselves fighting to get or keep their licenses. If you have questions, listen now.
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42 min
August 24, 2016
196: 2 Applications, an MBA and more. This doc is Outside the Box
Dr. Nii Darko took the long road to medicine. Growing up a first gen student left him learning about medicine from The Cosby Show. Learn how it influenced him.
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42 min
August 17, 2016
195: How Cram Fighter is Changing the Way You Study for the MCAT
Cramfighters came from Amit watching his wife struggle coming up with a plan to study for the boards. What was born is a new way to create a study schedule.
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28 min
August 10, 2016
194: Overcoming Disability and Biases
Jeff Gazzara wasn't going to let his vision stop him from becoming a physician. Learn how he overcome obstacles and some possible biases on his journey.
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34 min
August 3, 2016
193: Introduction to The MCAT Podcast
The MCAT Podcast is a collaboration between Next Step Test Prep and the Medical School Headquarters. This is a must listen to for those prepping for the MCAT.
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22 min
July 27, 2016
192: The Medical School Interview - How to Talk About You
Ryan discusses some key facets of the medical school interview. Being prepared to talk about yourself is one of hardest parts. Ryan breaks it down for you.
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24 min
July 20, 2016
191: Medical School Interview Q&A
Ryan takes questions asked in the Hangout and answers them here. If you have questions about the interview, check out http://www.medschoolinterviewbook.com!
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33 min
July 13, 2016
190: Premed Q&A - What Are My Chances and More
Ryan answers some questions that were called and emailed in. One wanted to know about flight medic training, another about her chances and many other questions.
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19 min
July 6, 2016
189: Failed MCAT Prep to Successful Applicant After Two Gap Years
Jake always knew he was premed in undergrad, but poor MCAT prep made him take a couple gap years to reset his plan of attack. He did that and is now at LECOM.
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33 min
June 29, 2016
188: How to Easily Improve Your Test Scores and Learning Skills
Dr. Saundra McGuire teaches students around the country how to better utilize their time studying so they learn the material and score higher on tests!
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41 min
June 22, 2016
187: Two Canadian Medical School Acceptances for this Premed
Rachel is a Canadian premed and recently received two acceptances to medical school in Canada. Check out her story and how she did it!
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46 min
June 15, 2016
186: This Author Thinks Our Premed Curriculum Needs Overhauled
In Session 182, I picked apart Ned's piece on retiring the premed curriculum. This week he joins me to defend his article. Listen and decide for yourself.
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42 min
June 8, 2016
185: A Medical Emergency Turned Former Teacher into a Premed
Brian shares his nontraditional path to medicine, which included teaching for 9 years before realizing that medicine was truly his calling.
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38 min
June 1, 2016
184: From Hating Anatomy to Finding His Path to an Acceptance
Ryan talks with Jimmy about his path to medicine, which started out as pre-nursing student and not liking studying the minutiae. He now has an acceptance!
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51 min
May 25, 2016
183: Why Did She Get Fired From Her Residency?
Ryan and Allison discuss why a Neurology resident was fired from her residency after a video of her during a not so flattering night. Listen to hear our take.
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34 min
May 18, 2016
182: Should the Premed Path Be Reworked?
Ryan discusses an article that was published, written by a Harvard medical student, about retiring the traditional premed path. Hint - Ryan doesn't agree!
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30 min
May 11, 2016
181: Gap Years, Healthcare Teamwork and more Premed Q&A
Ryan and Allison answer questions submitted through the MSHQ Hangout on Facebook. We talk about taking a Gap Year, teamwork and more. Check it out now!
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42 min
May 4, 2016
180: 10 Common MCAT Myths
Dr. Brett Ferdinand is a physician and creator of Gold-Standard.com and MCAT-Prep.com. He joins Ryan to share his thoughts on the 10 most common MCAT Myths.
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61 min
April 25, 2016
179: Why this Nontrad Helped Make a new MCAT Course
Elizabeth's experience with the MCAT test prep companies left her wanting more, so she joined forces with medQuest to start an MCAT course!
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40 min
April 15, 2016
178: The MCAT Podcast and More on GPAs and Masters Degrees
Ryan clarifies an answer he gave on last weeks podcast to help drive home his message. Also an exciting announcement about The MCAT Podcast!
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15 min
April 12, 2016
177: When to Take the MCAT and More Premed Q&A
Ryan answers your questions! We talk about MCAT timing, GPA, picking an undergrad and much more! Take a listen and don't forget to subscribe!
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20 min
April 4, 2016
176: How to Maintain Your Health and Fitness as a Premed
Ryan is joined by Ryan from thewhitecoatfitness.com who shares what he has learned about maintaining health and fitness through medical school. Take a listen!
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42 min
March 28, 2016
175: 9 Things We Wished Medical School Taught Us
Ryan and Allison cover a different kind of topic. They look back at their training and discuss what they wished they would have learned about during med school.
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42 min
March 22, 2016
174: Academically Dismissed to Medical School Acceptance
Kain started off on the wrong foot, and was academical dismissed. Listen to his story as he made up his mind to go back and finish school and become a doctor!
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38 min
March 14, 2016
173: How This Nontrad Got the Motivation to Return to be a Premed
Kristina wasn't a great high school student, and didn't do well in community college. She gave up her dream until she finally pushed and will be a med student!
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49 min
March 9, 2016
172: Common MCAT Prep Mistakes Premeds Make and How to Avoid Them
Ken Tao of the Princeton Review joins us to talk about common mistakes he sees premed students make as they prepare for the MCAT. Listen, learn, and avoid them!
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38 min
February 29, 2016
171: Reapplying to Med School - What You Need to Know to Improve
Christine is the former Dean of Admissions at UC Irvine and talks to us today about the biggest reason premeds get rejected and the steps to correct an app.
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34 min
February 24, 2016
170: PA Turned MD Talks About Why He Made the Switch
Brad is a former PA, who is now a first year medical student. Hear him talk about the difference between a PA and an MD and why he's changing careers now.
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36 min
February 17, 2016
169: What Impact Do You Want to Make? Live From AMSA PremedFest
This is a special episode, recorded live at the AMSA PremedFest outside of Tampa, FL on Jan 30th 2016. I asked students what impact they want to make as docs.
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17 min
February 10, 2016
168: 10 Acceptances to Medical School! This Nontrad Did it!
Jessica shares her nontraditional premed journey that started as an acting career. After a health scare with her dad, she rededicated herself to medicine.
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33 min
February 3, 2016
167: What is a Premed Postbac? How Danny Figured it Out!
Danny is a nontraditional premed who shares his story about living in China for several years before coming back to the states and starting a postbac.
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39 min
January 27, 2016
166: Regional Medical Schools and Sidney's Premed Path
Sidney shares her premed story about going to school in Idaho, not being around many premed students and applying to schools that are part of the WWAMI program.
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37 min
January 20, 2016
165: HPSP, Premed Major, Choosing an Undergrad and More Q&A
Ryan answers questions that have been emailed in and talks about his upcoming Medical School Interview book! Go to medschoointerviewbook.com for more info!
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22 min
January 13, 2016
164: Medical Ethics Questions You Can Expect In Your Interview
Ryan answers a question from the Facebook Hangout about how to answer medical ethics questions and resources to help.
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21 min
January 6, 2016
163: Introduction to the OldPreMeds Podcast
In this episode, Ryan introduces the OldPreMeds podcast, which you can find at OPMPodcast.com. Take a listen!
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20 min
December 30, 2015
162: 2015 Year in Review
Ryan go through the big changes in 2015 and talks about the top 7 podcast episodes of the year.
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26 min
December 23, 2015
161: 5 Biggest Medical School Personal Statement Mistakes
Ryan discusses the 5 most common mistakes he sees when reviewing personal statements. One of the most common is not giving yourself enough time. Take a listen!
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25 min
December 16, 2015
160: How a Liberal Arts Degree as a Premed Might be the Best One
Ryan is joined by Dr. Adele Wolfson, a biochemistry professor at Wellesley College. They discuss the liberal arts and how beneficial they can be to everything!
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38 min
December 9, 2015
159: Premed Q&A - PA vs MD or DO, What are my Chances and More
Allison and Ryan answer questions sent in from listeners like you! We talk about the HPSP scholarship, "what are my chances?" and talk about our new projects!
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26 min
December 1, 2015
158: Why Physicians Are Struggling with Happiness with Dr. Barrett
Dr. Paddy Barrett is a physician and host of The Doctor Paradox podcast where he digs into why physicians are struggling staying happy in an amazing profession.
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31 min
November 25, 2015
157: From Not Knowing what a DO was, to now being a DO student!
Amanda shares her story of wanting to be a PA, to learning what a DO physicain is and her journey to now being a first year osteopathic medical student.
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40 min
November 19, 2015
156: Securing your financial future starting now
Daniel Wrenne is a certified financial planner and works directly with medical students and residents to help them maximize their financial situations.
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34 min
November 10, 2015
155: Interested in never taking the MCAT?! Hear this story!
Jayme is currently junior in undergrad and has an early acceptance to the ATSU Still Scholars Early Acceptance Program! That means no MCAT! Take a listen.
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24 min
November 4, 2015
154: Two Acceptances, MD vs DO, One Tough Choice
Saidat joins us to talk about her traditional journey to medical school which ended with her having two acceptances - one from a MD and one from a DO school.
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27 min
October 28, 2015
153: Making the Tough Decision to be a Premed as a Non-Trad
Chris Thompson is currently a 4th year medical student and YouTuber helping others on their medical school journey. Listen to the show to hear the path he took!
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31 min
October 22, 2015
152: The MMI - Everything You Need to Know About the Interview
Dr. Rivera joins us once again, this time to talk about the Multiple Mini Interview - also known as the MMI. We discuss everything you need to know to maximize your MMI!
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33 min
October 14, 2015
151: 10 Things Every Premed Needs to Know with Dr. Strong
Dr. Strong has a very successful Youtube channel helping those in medicine understand some very difficult topics. He shares his top tips for premeds!
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40 min
October 7, 2015
150: Celebrating 150 Episodes! What We've Learned
Ryan and Allison talk about what the podcast has brought to us as physicians and how thankful we are for each and everyone of you for taking time to listen!
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17 min
October 1, 2015
149: So You Got into Medical School... Now What?
Dr. Daniel Paull is an authoer and current Ortho resident who chronicled his journey and the tips and tricks he learned along the way in his book!
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29 min
September 23, 2015
148: From the War Zone to Being Premed with Dr. Webb
Dr. Antonio Webb is a current Ortho resident and author of Overcoming the Odds. He shares his story of overcoming his odds and becoming what he is today.
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25 min
September 16, 2015
147: Shadowing, Grades, Research and more Premed Q&A
Ryan digs through the emails and Facebook posts to find the questions that you need to hear the answers to. If you have questions, check out our group.
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22 min
September 9, 2015
146: Common Medical School Interview Mistakes and How to Fix Them
We discuss the common mistakes that he has seen during mock interviews with premed students. Learn from other's and be prepared for your med school interview!
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26 min
September 2, 2015
145: Premed Jobs, Gap Years, GPA, MCAT and More Q&A
Premed collaboration at it's finest. We jumped on Blab to talk with premeds about their questions and struggles. We talked about the MCAT, GPA and so much more!
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66 min
August 26, 2015
144: Premed's Journey Through 2 Masters and a Baby
Ashley joins Ryan to talk about her dedicated path to medical school. Now a medical student, she overcame 2 cycles of rejection, 2 masters, and a baby!
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57 min
August 19, 2015
143: Overcoming Obstacles on Her Way to Medical School
Ryan talk to Silvia about her LONG journey to medical school, including taking 11 years to complete her premed studies, battling depression and more! Listen now!
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38 min
August 12, 2015
142: How Not to Select a Medical School as a Premed
Ryan talks about his frustrations with how some premed students rank what medical schools they are applying to. He breaks down one of the more popular lists.
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24 min
August 5, 2015
141: Calculating Premed GPA and other Listener Questions
Ryan answers questions that were sent in by listeners like you! Calculating your premed GPA, raising your GPA after you have graduated, and MCAT prep are some.
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20 min
July 29, 2015
140: Major Changes at MSHQ and Some Premed Q&A
Ryan and Allison talk about some major changes in their lives which will affect the Medical School Headquarters. They also answer some premed questions!
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38 min
July 22, 2015
139: Learning From a Successful 5 Year Premed Postbac Journey
Ryan is joined by Frank, who spent the last five years working full-time as an engineer, and working on his premed postbac. He starts med school this year!
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40 min
July 15, 2015
138: From Yoga Instructor to Medical School Acceptance Letter
Melissa, a non-trad, shares her journey as a burnt out premed to yoga instructor and world traveler to gaining acceptance to medical school starting this year.
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49 min
July 8, 2015
137: MCAT 2015 - A Review of All the Changes and New Tips
Bryan from Next Step Test Prep joins us to talk about his experiences taking the new MCAT 2015. He received a 44 on the old one, and did just as well this time!
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43 min
July 1, 2015
136: What is a Scribe and How it Can Benefit the Premed
Bailey from Elite Medical Scribes joins the podcast to talk about what a medical scribe is and how you, the premed, can benefit immensely from the experience!
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24 min
June 24, 2015
135: Overcoming 4 Application Cycles and 9 MCAT Tests!
Brian talks about his long journey to medical school that includes 4 applications cycles and 9 MCAT tests! Listen to what he has learned on his path.
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37 min
June 17, 2015
134: The Mailbag - MCAT Prep, Premed Majors and Shadowing
Ryan answers questions that have come in through our Facebook group. Students ask questions about MCAT prep, shadowing and volunteering hours and much more!
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20 min
June 10, 2015
133: Maximizing Your Shadowing Experience With Bedside Manner
Ryan and Allison talk about bedside manner, and what you, as a premed, can do now to help you with your bedside manner for the future. Take a listen!
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37 min
June 3, 2015
132: There are Non-Traditional Medical Students and Residents Too
Ryan is joined by Dr. Topf, who blogs about his craft at pbfluids.com. They discuss a non-traditional path through the medical education system.
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43 min
May 27, 2015
131: Don't Give Up Just Because Someone Says It's "Different Now"
Ryan and Allison talk about a piece on KevinMD about a medical school dropout, who talks about her dream being crushed by the process.
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31 min
May 21, 2015
130: A Canadian Premed Talks about His Journey to Med School
Darby joins Ryan on the podcast to discuss what life was like as a non-traditional applicant to Canadian medical school, and life as a Canadian premed.
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40 min
May 13, 2015
129: IQ, Canadian Premed, Retaking Courses and More Q&A
We dig deep into their email boxes and pull questions that you, the premed, have asked. We answer a handful of great questions coving a lot of different topics.
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43 min
May 6, 2015
128: 9 Tips to Successfully Submit Your Med School Applications
Ryan and Allison are back together talking about the AMCAS and AACOMAS applications. These medical school applications are a difficult and you need to be prepared!
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43 min
April 29, 2015
127: The Medical School Application Personal Statement
Ryan and Allison give a sneak peak inside the Academy, the premiere premed advising community, and share a webinar given on the medical school personal statement.
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73 min
April 22, 2015
126: #AskMSHQ - Should I turn down a DO Acceptance?
Ryan discusses a question from a premed who only applied to DO schools, got accepted, and is now thinking about waiting a year and applying to MD schools.
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14 min
April 15, 2015
125: The High Stress World of the Residency Match
Ryan and Allison talk about the NRMP - National Resident Matching Program, the system that determines where you will be doing your residency training.
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30 min
April 8, 2015
124: Get Paid to Study for the MCAT with DrSmarts!
Dr. Rashid Taher from DrSmarts.com joins Ryan to talk about his path to becoming an Opthamalogist and founder of Dr. Smarts, a leading site for MCAT prep.
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29 min
April 1, 2015
123: Overcoming 12 Withdrawls and 5 F's as a Premed
Matt tells his story of a failed start as a premed undergrad career and how he turned it around. Now he has a med school acceptance. Listen to his whole story!
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34 min
March 25, 2015
122: Develop Your Patient Skills with an Incredible Gap Year
The Center for Patient Partnerships offers an amazing experience to premeds, medical students and physicians to together with patients, advocating for them.
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46 min
March 18, 2015
121: 7 Reasons Premeds Don't Get Into Medical School
Ryan is flying solo to talk about 7 top reasons premed students fail to gain acceptance to medical school. The third reason is the most inexcusable!
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25 min
March 16, 2015
120: How This Non-Trad Beat a Bad MCAT score and a low GPA
Listen to Ben share his story not doing well in undergrad, changing to premed, and finding out how to succeed, overcoming a low MCAT score to get an acceptance!
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34 min
March 4, 2015
119: Listern Q&A - How to Balance Being a Mom and an Attending
Allison and Ryan answer a question that was emailed in from Grace. She asked how Allison balanced being a new mom, and an attending. We discuss this in detail!
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38 min
February 22, 2015
118: Dr. Pho, of KevinMD, talks about his path and medicine today
Kevin Pho is most known for his blog, KevinMD, is still a practicing physician. We talk about healthcare today and what you should know about it as a premed.
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30 min
February 18, 2015
117: Dr. Tom Peteet shares his Non-traditional Premed Path
Tom Peteet in an internal medicine resident who take a roundabout way to get to medical school. He shares his premed path with us and his plans for the future.
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29 min
February 11, 2015
116: How to Earn Awesome Grades with Thomas Frank
Thomas Frank is the publisher of College Info Geek and host of the podcast by the same name - helping undergrads be awesome at college. He can help premeds too!
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55 min
February 3, 2015
115: OldPreMeds Executive Director and Non-Traditional Premed Expert
Rich Levy from OldPreMeds.org joins us for the second time to talk non-traditional premed news and his upcoming conference. If you're a non-trad, check it out!
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42 min
January 27, 2015
114: A Non-traditional Premed Turned Medical Spanish Podcaster!
Dr. Molly Martin didn't really know she wanted to be a physician until later in undergrad. Listen to her journey, which includes a love for the latino culture.
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31 min
January 21, 2015
113: Shadowing Abroad as a Premed with Gap Medics
Ricky from GapMedics.com stops by to discuss what shadowing abroad can do for the premed and what experiences are available. We discuss travel, safety and more.
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24 min
January 14, 2015
112: If Doctors Can't Be Doctors, Why Bother Being Premed?
Ryan and Allison discuss a very disturbing article on KevinMD from a physician who seems disgruntled with the healthcare system. We talk about why we disagree!
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37 min
January 7, 2015
111: 6 Tips For Improving Patient Communication (The 6th is Key!)
Improving patient communication, whether as a premed or medical student or beyond is the number one skill that you can start working on now with real benefits!
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41 min
December 31, 2014
110: Here Comes 2015 - Big Things to Come for All!
Ryan and Allison discuss what they are looking forward to in 2015 and what you can do as a premed and medical student to prepare yourself!
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24 min
December 23, 2014
109: Medical School Headquaters 2014 Year in Review
Ryan talks about some of his favorite highlights from 2014, including some awesome download numbers from the podcast and visitors to the website.
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17 min
December 17, 2014
108: Overcoming a DUI and More on His Way to Med School
Ryan now has an acceptance to medical school, but as a premed, that wasn't always a sure thing. With several alcohol related incidents, he needed to change!
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34 min
December 10, 2014
107: How Premeds Aren't Prepared for Medical School and More!
As a premed, you think you are kind of the hill. Then medical school hits and you realize you are average! Then in practice you realize there is more to learn!
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47 min
December 3, 2014
106: Osteopathic Medicine and the Path for one DO with 4 Kids!
Dr. Anita Showalter began her undergrad career as a nursing student. After some twists and turns, ultimatley decided that being a physician was what she wanted!
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39 min
November 26, 2014
105: The Intersection of Medicine, Social Media and Technology
Dr. Bryan Vartabedian from 33charts.com joins us to discuss how premeds, medical students and physicians need to take advantage of their online presence
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30 min
November 19, 2014
104: Physicians & Premeds Can Still be Thankful!
Session 104 What a great two-year journey it has been for the Medical School HQ Podcast. Yup! This 104th episode actually marks the second year anniversary of our podcast. Four episodes ago we played the 100th podcast, where we featured stories from our listeners. Today, let this episode be our opportunity to express our heartfelt gratitude for what amazing journey it has been for us as physicians as well as being able to help medical students walk through their medical school journey. Sure there are challenges and the future may seem bleak, but there is always light at the very end of the tunnel so let’s continue to hold on to each other. There is so much negativity in the physician world today where physicians would discourage students to go to medical school and that’s sad. We started this podcast with the aim to show you everything you need to know about getting to medical school: all the triumphs, struggles, and what not. And as long as you’re doing it for the right reasons? It should all be worth it! At at that time during the initial podcast, our website had over 50,000 page views. Fastforward to today, we’re over 600,000 page views and over 200,000 podcast downloads. Wow! We continue to grow everyday and that’s because of you listening right now who still continue to give us feedback . We have over 220 5-star ratings in iTunes. For all of you guys taking the time to go to medicalschoolhq.net/itunes, giving us reviews and sharing us to your friends, THANK YOU! We wouldn’t have grown as big as we are today without your help. So in this episode, we are talking about the things we are thankful for in general. Allison: Given the opportunity everyday that she can make a difference, no matter how small it is, still it’s a difference! The feeling of a patient telling you that you have helped them improve their quality of life. When you’re seeing people who are dying and you’re trying to help the family ease through the suffering - it’s rewarding. Working with a team especially in an inpatient setting The way medical teaching structure works Ryan: His ability to reassure patients that everything’s going to be okay is a huge part of healing in of itself. Being in a room, behind closed doors, and be one-on-one with a patient Their podcast helping students get to medical school If you just started listening to this podcast, go back to start and listen to Episode 1. We guarantee that the information you will get from the podcast will help you get into medical school. And congratulations to all the listeners who have made it to medical school and who have take the time to let us know how we have helped them in their journey. We are so honored to have been a part of your journey and thank you for letting us know. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Yes, you can be a physician and still be thankful for being a physician. On a sad note, there was an article written on medical students who committed suicide. It’s not an easy road. But hold fiercely your dreams and desire to do this because it is worth it! Do it for the right reasons. Get informed. It’s not all rainbows and sunshine. There are challenges definitely! But it’s all worth it if you do it for the right reasons. Let’s continue to be supportive of one another. There are days you feel like quitting, so let’s all support each other. It’s collaboration that’s going to make us better. Join the Academy, we’ve got 5 members who already got to medical school and that makes us proud to be able to help them in some ways. We will give you the support that you need. We will review your personal statements. We do mock reviews. We’ll meet once a month for office hours. And we would be happy if you too could jump on board and take us along your medical school journey. Links and Other Resources: Episode 1 - Welcome to the Medical School HQ Podcast Episode 98 - Time to Get Touchy Feely - Let’s Talk Physical Exam Episode 45 - 5 Reasons to Go to Medical School, and 5 to Not
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30 min
November 12, 2014
103: She Made Every Mistake Possible, Yet is Still a Medical Student!
Shay is the author of the book Getting Into Medical School: The Ultimate Guide for the Anxious Premed. Listen to her journey and how she overcame mistakes.
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39 min
November 6, 2014
102: A 1st Year DO Student's Journey from Being Minister
Neal was a minister, but wanted something different when he was interaction with others in medical environments. Listen to his journey back into school & more!
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44 min
October 29, 2014
101: The Top Habits and Attitudes of Humanistic Physicians
The Academic Medicine journal had a great article about the habits and attitudes of physicians, things you can start doing now as a premed! We talk about them.
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43 min
October 22, 2014
100: Your Amazing Premed Stories!
Session 100!! Your premed stories are shared this week! 6 different listeners called/wrote in to share their premed journey to medical school. You must listen!
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74 min
October 15, 2014
99: Balancing Family Life with Premed and Medical School
Thomas, a listener of the podcast, emailed in a great question about balancing family life and being a physician. We give our thoughts on the subject and more!
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61 min
October 8, 2014
98: Time to Get Touchy Feely - Let's Talk Physical Exam
Dr. Danielle Ofri has a great piece in the New York Times titled "The Physical Exam as Refuge." Allison and I discuss this and give our thoughts for the premed.
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35 min
October 1, 2014
97 : More Premed Q&A - Undergrads, Volunteering and More
In this episode, Allison and Ryan answer listener questions about choosing an undergrad, clinical volunteering, what to do before medical school and much more!
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39 min
September 24, 2014
96: NYU's 3 Year MD Program - a Discussion with Their Dean
Dr. Rivera, Director of Admissions at NYU, talks about their innovative 3 year MD program and what it means for the future of medicine. Hint - It sounds great!
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45 min
September 17, 2014
95 : Going From Community College, to Premed, to Med Student
In this episode we talk to Deandre, a 1st year BU Medical Student who was lost as a premed. He spent several years at community college before finding his way!
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44 min
September 10, 2014
94: Securing Your Financial Future as Premed and Medical Student
Session 94 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Ryan Michler who runs WealthAnatomy.com and who also hosts the podcast of the same name. Ryan is a financial advisor who specializes in working with physicians. Ryan shares with us his experiences working with physicians, the greatest mistakes physicians make that they end up being broke even if they're making more than $400,000 a year, and how you can align yourself to success regardless of where you are right now in your premed or medical school journey. Money is a huge cause of stress for most Americans and although you think this may not seem pertinent still being a premed or medical student, this is completely pertinent to your happiness after medical school so you need to pay attention NOW! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan: How Ryan got involved working with physicians: His background initially in retail management and joining the military Realizing he wanted to impact people's lives through financial planning The biggest mistakes physicians are making with their finances: Failure to create the right habits Getting into debt prior to medical school (credit card debts, car and home loans) The biggest mistake of physicians with high income who still end up being broke: Huge debt issue Excessive vehicles, toys, and home destroy their ability to get ahead; plus their student loans, etc. Entertainment is specifically a huge budget item for many people (dining out, vacations, travel) RIGHT HABITS that you should start forming now: Budgeting Understand that you have to get a hold of your finances. Worry about your cashflow - the lifeblood of your money. Understand where every dollar is coming in and going out. Budgeting is one thing you can't delegate. Budgeting tools you can take advantage of: Mint.com YNAB (You Need A Budget) Include in your financial discussions the people that need to be included. Include your spouse or your financial planning team or your parents when discussing your finances. Take out emotions and really live by the rules. Save. It doesn't matter how much you start with, just get into the habit of doing it. Figure out the best way to pay off your debts. For example: The snowball or pay down strategy - prioritize the order in which you should pay off based on three factors (interest rate, term, and payment). Why Ryan suggests to work on the lowest balance first 90% of the time: Psychological victory when you get a debt line paid off. Increased flexibility Track your savings, investment, cash flow, and debts When talking about investment and savings, use percentages instead of fixed dollar amount. Pay yourself first then you can spend the rest of the money however you want. Increase that percentage as your income level increases. Have the mindset of paying your debt and not to replace it with new debt. Spend less than you earn. Same as your health - calories in, calories out. Surround yourself with the right people. Surround yourself with people who are in line with what you want to accomplish. On retirement... Pay down loans or/and pay in to retirement? Paying off loans first: Pros: Guaranteed rate of return Debt-free, now you can start investing Cons: Flexibility issues Investing first: Pros: You get into the habit of investing You get rates of return that outpace 6-8% in investments More flexibility What Ryan suggests... Find a happy medium between paying off loans and investing. Some pieces of advice for premed students, medical students, fellows, residents: Set up an account at mint.com. Start getting hold of money that comes in and money going out.  Budgeting is not enough. Address protection issues. Consider disability insurance or life insurance (these are underutilized areas but really important even when you're in school). Don't cash in your 401K that you had through your previous employer. Use the pay down strategy to pay off your debt as fast as you can. Resources you can use: Find people in your life that have the type of success you want to have. Investopedia.com - Learn how to invest and learn about all the terms Links and Other Resources: Listen to Ryan's podcast at Wealth Anatomy if you're looking to address many of these issues. MSHQ 074 : 1st Year of Medical School For A Non-Trad Mint: Money, Budgeting, Finance & Investing Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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47 min
September 3, 2014
93: Ex-Army Dermatologist Talks About His Path through USUHS
Session 93 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Chad Hendrickson, who recently got out of army as a dermatologist and is now working private practice. Chad shares with us his medical school journey applying to the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), also known as the military medical school, as well as his thought processes for the choices he made specifically why he chose being a physician over a PA, a military medical school over a regular one, and the army over the navy and the air force. He also shares his pieces of advice to those interested in taking the USUHS Medical School route. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Chad: Chad's journey through medical school: His uncle's influence in his life Deciding to become a PA and eventually a physician Switching to premed in undergrad Staying out for a year before going to college Being a solid C average in high school to nearly a 4.0 in college by 2nd semester His thought process for choosing the USUHS: Initially applying to the National Institutes of Health for a pre-Intramural Research Training Award (pre-IRTA) but finally deciding apply to the military medical school Went to an accelerated one-year master's program, more like a medical school prep course Factors for choosing USUHS over Georgetown Discussions with his wife on the pros and cons of going to a military medical school Choosing between the army, the navy, and the air force: His initial choice of serving the air force but it was filled up The army as his next best choice What's it's like going to a military medical school (during his time): Wearing a uniform everyday. Maintaining a level of professionalism and military bearing. Med student first and you're an officer second Maintaining weight standards to pass the mandatory PT test although mandatory physical training not required Everybody comes in as a second lieutenant and you have to go through the officer basic course before the start of med school Getting pinned O3 once you graduate His journey through the dermatology residency right out of USUHS: Chad was lucky to get into the army's select residencies including derm where you can go straight in and don't have to pay your dues Out of med school, he went straight to internship and 3 years of derm residency On his practice as a dermatologist in the army: Retirees as the larger portion of his demographics Kinds of cases he was seeing Working in the U.S. and in Germany Spent a total of 7 years as an active duty dermatologist and living in Germany On his choice for leaving the military and doing private practice: Choosing between a good life and practice in Germany and a chance for his kids to live with family back home in Pennsylvania The duality of being a doctor and officer: Getting deployed in Iraq as a general medical officer Being pinned Major when he was down-ranged in Iraq His amazing experiences serving as a military physician outweighed what he may have missed in private practice in that 7 years Some pieces of advice for premed students who are looking at going to a military medical school or the HPSP scholarship: The training opportunities are amazing. You can do a lot of things that civilian med students and physicians don't get to do. Explore your options and listen to the MSHQ podcast or talk to a military physician or people like Chad who's in the outside now and whether he would do it all over again. On Chad's podcast: Being interested in podcasts even while he was back in the military Listening to John Lee Dumas' Entrepreneur On Fire Why Chad thinks podcasts rock His podcast talks about dermatological issues for patients Some pieces of advice for premed students: Go in with an open mind and you begin to identify with the personalities in certain specialties. Go through each learning experience and put a ton of energy into it. Links and Other Resources: Chad's Website - drchadhendrickson.com Military Medical School - Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Check out Chad's podcast: Dermatology House Call with Dr. Chad Hendrickson and his blog at drchadhendrickson.com Free MCAT Gift:Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
August 27, 2014
92: What an Attending Would Tell Her Premed & Med Student Self
Session 92 In this episode, Ryan is joined by Allison as they talk about Allison's first work anniversary in private practice. This episode is framed for premed students and medical students or even residents as to what certain things need to be considered when thinking about work in private practice. Learn about the good, the bad, and the ugly as Allison shares her highlights, her struggles, and her insights from her first year of private practice which you can learn from as early as now. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Allison graduated from the Harvard Neurology Residency Program in June 2013. She is now an attending physician working at a private practice in Boston and affiliated with a nearby academic teaching hospital. 85% of her time is spent on outpatient practice while 15% is on inpatient and ER consults. An overview of cases Allison are seeing and call schedules The best things about Allison's practice: The fulfillment of establishing relationships with patients Seeing the evolution of things and people Learning through your patient population in real-time Establishing working relationships with other primary care physicians in the community who refer patients to her - a critical part in building your patient base The power of collaboration and teamwork: You need to build these skills as premeds, medical students, and residents Having a positive mindset on the concept of second opinion It all boils down to patient care Allison's struggles during her first year in private practice: Lack of experience An uncomfortable feeling of knowing that you don't know everything Balancing inpatient and outpatient responsibilities while dealing with her pregnancy Taking late night calls from home On getting access to resources that you used to easily get right at your fingertips as an in-house physician: When you are a medical student or resident, start asking those questions of the case managers you're interacting with everyday. If you are shadowing with a physician, look and see what they have available and take notes. Skills Allison wished she had learned earlier: Billing Knowing how to create an efficient team in an outpatient setting On dictation: The importance of learning how to dictate when you're training Streamlining things by utilizing tools such as Breevy, a text expander tool that allows you to be more efficient in writing your notes 3 Things Allison would tell her younger self to help her on where she is now: Stay focused. You will go through all the hurdles, hard work, and sleepless nights so stay focused as best you can. Stay flexible. Allow yourself some flexibility to change your mind along the way. Stay passionate. There are people who will try to drag you down so stick with it and keep fueling that passion to keep you going. Links and Other Resources: Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Read one of articles gleaned from this podcast, 8 Pieces of Information Every Premed Should Know Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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44 min
August 20, 2014
91: Preparing for the Medical School Interview
Session 91 Back again for the fourth time, Dr. Greg Polites graces today's show. Dr. Polites is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. He also volunteers his time for the Admissions Committee at the school. In today's episode, Ryan and Greg talk about preparing for the medical school interview, when to start and how to start the legwork, to help you ace your medical school interview. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Greg: Things to prepare for the medical school interview: Research about the school before you show up. Explore their website and learn more about them to show your genuine interest in the school. Be prepared for specific content areas. Know the hot topics in the news, enough to intelligently discuss them. (ex. PPACA) Be able to form an opinion and discuss it in a way that shows a respectful tone towards someone with a different opinion. Don't give the interviewer answers you think they want to hear but one based on information you've researched and understanding that. Go through some of these difficult areas and think about them enough that you won't be thrown off guard (ex. stem cell research, medical malpractice, abortion) Application picture has to look professional. Attend an event that the school offers a night before or on the day of the interview in order to learn more about the school and meet some students to see if you're a good fit for the school. Don't hesitate to ask questions during the interview. Avoid asking questions that are too analytical. It should be a effortless conversation. Do a mock interview. A mock interview is important to help you polish your interview skills. Record yourself when doing mock interviews to watch out for nervous ticks, fillers, etc. Be relatively conservative in your appearance. Dress professional and don't wear something that will raise questions. Be clean and appropriate. Male applicants have to dress with a suit and a tie and females have to wear their Sunday best. Assess your communication skills. Work on your communication skills because it is an important aspect in being a physician. Be yourself. Be affable. Let them see your personality and why you're a good fit. The admissions committee wants to know you as a person and if you're a good fit. More Do's and Don'ts During the Interview: Pose some questions at the end but not too many. Avoid one-word answers. Don’t ramble. Don’t interrupt the interviewer. Don’t blurt out answers if you don't know what you're saying. Take a minute to think about it. Know your research and activities well and be prepared to discuss these. Be honest and straightforward. Never curse. Don’t bring up inappropriate topics which could make your interview uncomfortable. Don't badmouth another professor or another school. Don’t be arrogant. Take time to listen to the other person talking. Listen to the question. Be positive and friendly. Don't cry. Don’t speak too fast. Smile. Don't be overbearing when expressing your interest in the school... Is it okay to send your interviewer a "thank you" letter? Yes. Email is fine. A thank you card is appropriate too. Links and Other Resources: Other interviews featuring Dr. Greg Polites: Session 023 - Interview with Dr. Polites of MedPrep at Wash.U. Session 035 - How to Fix a Medical School Application After Starting Premed Poorly Session 088 - Writing Personal Statements for Medical School Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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53 min
August 13, 2014
90: Study Habits and Tips for the Premed Student
Session 90 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Lea, a premed student at Pitzer College in California. She has a blog called freshprogressgeek.tumblr.com and today she shares with us things about developing study habits, preparing for the MCAT, the 7-year BA/MD program that she’s currently attending, the tools and resources she used along the journey, and just about a little bit of everything. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Lea: When Lea knew she wanted to be a doctor: Promised herself to do healthcare delivery Wanting to be a neonatologist Rather be a "no doctor" than be a mediocre doctor The importance of being informed especially about the healthcare changes Finding a mentor: Lea found her mentor and developed a natural relationship that placed great impact on her career and journey to becoming a doctor. She also found three other mentors through social media. Take initiative. Reach out to them. Ask and be denied than rather not ask at all and not know what could have been. Narrowing down her majors: At her high school, they get to choose their majors by the time they finish freshmen Her current medical program: 7 years BA and DO linkage program 3 years of undergrad, 4 years medical school Applying for the medical program prior to undergrad application Narrowing down applicants from around 200 to 20 Going through an undergrad interview and a medical school interview (4 hours in total) at 17 years old Other programs don't even require you to take an MCAT On developing study habits transitioning from easy high school to a more challenging environment in college: Don't give up. Save the homework problems you couldn't do by yourself and do them on office hours. Study habits are personal to everyone. Find the method or environment that works the best for you. Resources she used: Evernote - note-taking app useful during reporting or take pictures of diagrams that get planted in your notes YouTube - especially for organic chemistry and biology; find out how you can make the video go faster Website recommendations: College Info Geek from Thomas Frank Study Hacks Blog from Cal Newport and his book How to Win at College Preparing for the MCAT: Why Lea chose Kaplan Take a lot of practice exams. Do a postmortem of the practice test to find out why you missed what you missed and why you got right on what you got right on each practice test. Learn different tricks and strategies to boost your score. On her blog: Started as a means to express herself and find a way to turn negative into a positive Go-to tips for premed students who are struggling everyday: Collect yourself and talk to your advisor, mentors, or upperclassmen to see what you can change. Understand the importance of knowing what kind of study habit works for you. Download the app called Study Time, a Google chrome app that blocks Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, and all other sites that would distract you from studying. Turn off your phone while studying. Keep informed and understand what's happening right now with healthcare Visit her blog Fresh Progress Geek Listen to this podcast. Links and Other Resources: Fresh Progress Geek Pitzer College College Info Geek from Thomas Frank Study Hacks Blog from Cal Newport MSHQ Session 016: Interview with Mount Sinai - All About FlexMed Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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42 min
August 6, 2014
89: How to Choose Which Medical Schools to Apply To
Session 89 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about choosing a medical school, the thought processes behind why they chose the schools they applied to, and things you need to consider as you're going through the process of figuring out where to go to. Medical schools across the United States are excellent and the current average number of medical schools that people apply to is 15. It really doesn’t matter how many schools you get into as long as you get into one. It all boils down into choosing a medical school that best fits you, your preferences, your personality, and your needs. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Below is a guide to help you narrow down your choices of medical schools to apply to: State school vs. Out-of-State State schools supply seats for state residents with rules and percentages of seats that go to state residents. If you're an out-of-state resident applying to a state school, you have to have 44 in MCAT, 4.0 GPA, or you need to know somebody who knows somebody, or explain why you're going to stay in that state and practice medicine. Residency affiliations Go to medical school with an open mind. If you're leaning towards a specialty, look for schools that have affiliations with a residency program. This will make it easier for you to get exposed to the people within that hospital and start building relationships. Know the number of hospitals within the area and which hospital affiliations the medical school has. Why determining residency affiliations is important: Allows you to get a taste of the patient demographics. Notice the disparity of health care between the the affluent and the low-income brackets and this will widen your experience. Gives you an idea as to where you may end up living and which areas you’ll be rotating. MD vs. DO DO schools may not be affiliated with a large academic teaching hospital so make sure to see what is around that school to look for opportunities to do rotations or research or work with people within your vicinity. Treat MD and DO schools the same. Don't look at them any differently. In the end, you will be treating patients and you're practicing medicine in either of both. MDs treat holistically as well and DOs prescribe medications. So the way they both practice medicine is the same. There is a growing misconception that DO schools are inferior to MD schools because of the possible reasons: DO application allows for grade replacement on your application so if you took Calculus and got a C and took it again and got an A, the DO application will credit your new score. MD application will get the average of the two and give you a B. Don't think that just because your grades aren't “good enough” for MD schools, then you should apply to a DO school. In fact, statistics suggests that it's harder to get into a DO school Weather Be aware of the weather conditions especially if you have a preference for certain types of outdoors (warm or cold). Also, be careful about going to a place that's constantly nice that would give you the urge to go out to the beach everyday. Be in a place where you can be happy but also where you can focus. Proximity to family and friends Consider whether you want to be near your family/relatives or you want to get away from them. Some people prefer to be near their family so they can get the support whenever they need it while some prefer otherwise. GPA and MCAT You are a lot more than your numbers! When you're going through the MSAR or CIB, what you're seeing there is just a statistics. If your scores are lower than the average of that school, that doesn't mean you can't get into that school. That is just the average. So don't the let the numbers discourage you. Instead, go to the schools. Look at the environment and the state it's in. Look at the hospital affiliations and the kind of research going on at the school and the class size. But the numbers should not make or break the list. Links and Other Resources: MSHQ 051 : The Journey to a Caribbean Medical School MSHQ 075 : What are My Chances of Getting into Med School? Poor people with diabetes more likely to lose a limb Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq. Connect with Allison through email at allison@medicalschool.net
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42 min
July 29, 2014
88: Writing Personal Statements for Medical School
Session 88 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Greg Polites, an associate professor of Emergency Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis, where he teaches a premed course as well as at the medical school. For his third time on the show, Greg talks about the do's and don'ts of writing personal statements and why students make mistakes on personal statements. If you're struggling with your personal statement and need some help and motivation, brace yourself for the wealth of information that you will learn from today's show. The personal statement in and of itself is not the determining factor for getting into medical school but it's still an important piece of the application to allow the admissions committee to understand you better so take your time to do it right. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Greg: The enigma of the personal statements: There is no right and wrong. It's your personal statement. It becomes an enigma as students try to figure out what an admissions committee wants to hear. Don't put too much energy in trying to figure out what the committee wants. It's all about you. Give schools a glimpse of who you are, the person behind the paper. Write about anything that ties into to why you why you want to do medicine. Every school is different in terms of their admissions criteria. A personal statement is not a make or break as what most students think. The Do's in Writing Personal Statements Be able to explain why this is the path you've chosen. Have 3 different people read your personal statement before submitting it: A person who knows you well (ex. a parent or friend to show your internal consistency) A person to proofread your statement for grammatical correctness A person who can read it for substance and content (ex. advisor) It has to be about your experience, not the admissions committee. It should flow nicely, easy, and effortless to read. It doesn't have to be long. Write 1-2 experiences to not lose the overall impact and simply circle around answering the question why medicine is a good fit for you. Take the time to write it. The Red Flags in Writing Personal Statements Which You Should Avoid Writing a poor personal statement with spelling and grammatical errors which is indicative that you did not put the time to do it right. No display of maturity Meanders and lacks focus Trying to be unique that they come off too corky Writing your personal statement to rehash your CV. Don't go through every aspect of it. Using too much of the first person or "I did this or that." Write about your experiences and what they meant to you and not what you've achieved. Show, don't tell. Quotes in personal statement: Yes, if it ties in well and cite it. Should red flags like terrible grades or undergrad be addressed in the personal statement? Yes, because there aren't a lot of other places in the primary application to put that. Secondary application, if there is any, may not be a great place for that. Links and Other Resources: Session 23: Interview with Dr. Polites of MedPrep at Wash. U. Session 35: How to Fix a Medical School Application After Starting Premed Poorly Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq  
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29 min
July 23, 2014
87: 5 Things You Need to Do to Start Preparing for MCAT 2015
Session 87 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Bryan from Next Step Test Prep. He previously joined us in Session 59 as he talked about about retaking the MCAT. Bryan is the Academic Director at Next Step Test Prep where he also serves as an MCAT tutor. Having been in the MCAT game for about 15 years now, Bryan switched over to Next Step to focus on one-on-one private tutoring. Today, this episode will focus on the MCAT 2015, what to expect, how to prepare for it, and the resources you will be needing. As times are changing, the MCAT is also changing. Medical schools have recognized the need for aligning their expectations to incoming medical students and so they have driven such changes. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Bryan: Why does MCAT stress people out so much? It's outside the normal realm of what they're doing. Can you take the old MCAT (until January 2015)? Yes, there is a much more established baseline for it but always check with the medical school you're applying to first. Can you take the MCAT with only half a semester of physics? Self-study a single semester's worth of content. What's added to the new MCAT? 8-9 hour day Unsettled landscape 5 Things You Need to Do to Start Preparing for the MCAT 2015: Buy and read the official guide from cover to cover. Go to the AAMC website and buy a copy of the official guide. Find out what's on this thing, how it's scored, the duration of the test, what the practice passages look like. Read it from cover to cover. Bryan shares a dirty, little secret: 99.9% of what webinars offer come straight out of the official guides. So read the guide yourself and you will know as much about MCAT as most MCAT tutors. Plan out your course work. Bryan suggests taking 3 semesters of biology or 2 years of biology since the whole test now has a flavor of biology to it (and even chemistry and physics). All concepts now have a biological systems feel to it. The more well-versed you are with bio, the better for you. Take one semester of each of the following: biochemistry, psychology, and sociology. Make sure to have at least one semester of class specifically devoted to experimental design or statistics course. Although AAMC does not require this, it would definitely help. Know when is the best time to take the test. For April test dates, scores will be released after two months. For April test dates, scores will be released after 1 1/2 month. Do not take the test in April and May so as not to make yourself a guinea pig. since AAMC will only provide an estimated percentile score in 2-3 weeks. Bryan recommends taking the test in June, July, or maybe August. Ryan recommends taking the test when you are most psyched and ready to take the test. Use other resources such as prep books and practice test materials. Prep books are a popular choice such as Kaplan and Princeton. Consider picking a bigger set of prep books. For practice test materials, the content is always straightforward. The key is to go to multiple prep companies. Do the one official test from the AAMC and at least 3 or 4 tests from 2 or 3 different prep companies. Join a good study group. Get support from other people who are also going through it since they can provide you academic, emotional, and social support. Run the study group like you're the teacher. Give each other homework and cross-teach each other to help see how other people think. This gives you cognitive flexibility. Your study group serves as your accountability group, not your competition. "You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with." - Jim Rohn Best ways to prepare for the new humanities and social science subjects: Verbal reasoning changed to critical analysis and reasoning skills but none is actually changing except for public health Read everyday. Pick up the philosophy textbook, Reason and Responsibility Take a semester of Psych 101 and Socio 101 Buy a good set of prep books You have to be comfortable with the language of the different psych and sociology terms. About Next Step Test Prep: Focuses solely on one-on-one private tutoring High quality tutors They offer tutoring services online and in-person. Links and Other Resources: The Official Guide to the MCAT® Exam (MCAT2015) Get MCAT 2015 Books One-On-One Test Preparation Tutoring | Next Step Test Prep 2015 for Students - Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Connect with Next Step Test Prep on Twitter @nextstepprep.
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46 min
July 15, 2014
86: Premed Q&A, Volunteering, Personal Statements & Much More
Session 86 In today’s episode, Ryan and Allison answer some questions that have been emailed to us over the last couple of months. This week, we touch on topics involving taking prerequisites at a community college, personal statements, volunteering opportunities, finding a mentor, choosing an undergrad school, and more. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Q:  Will taking medical school prerequisites at a community college hurt your chances in going to medical school? A:  If you had the option, it is optimal to take your prerequisites at an accredited four-year school to show the admissions committee that you can handle hard sciences at the level of rigor that will allow you to be able to handle medical school classes. However, if you’re already at a community college, contact the actual medical school you’re applying to and directly ask if they will accept this. Don’t be shy until you’re actually an applicant. Check out Session 23 and Session 35 where they talk about community colleges. Q:  What kinds of volunteering opportunities can you participate in that are not health care-based? A:  Clinical experience and volunteering are both important. Have other volunteering types of experiences such as showing that you are able to put others first and give back to your community. In volunteering, don't just do it for the sole purpose of putting it on your application; instead, it should be something you enjoy and connect with. There are so many things you can do such as volunteering at a senior center, with the Boys and Girls Club, Big Brothers, Big Sisters, Habitat for Humanity, and schools that have volunteering opportunities for tutoring, or volunteering abroad. Check out Episode 68 for additional information about shadowing opportunities vs. patient exposure. Q:  How do you find a premed advisor or mentor? A:  First, you can go back to your pre-health office. Then there are tons of information on the internet. You may also seek help from medical schools or consult with paid premed advisors (can be really pricey). The Academy is a paid premed services site with a small monthly fee but you get monthly office hours and the community aspect including webinars and more. Just go to jointheacademy.net. Q:  What school to pursue – Quinnipiac or UConn? A:  The name on your diploma doesn't matter that much. It's what you're putting into the effort at the school that's going to matter. The cost plays a huge role. You don't want to go to medical school and have a huge burden of undergrad debt afterwards. You can find plenty of research opportunities at a small regional campus as well as plenty of shadowing experiences. Don't worry about the name of the school because your grades will speak for themselves and all the other things you've done. Q: What is an autobiographical sketch and how do you write one? A:  An autobiographical sketch is a snapshot of your life and the major, meaningful things and life experiences that make you who are you are. This is is basically the same as a personal statement. Here are some general tips when writing your personal statement: Don't make it a timeline. Try to hook them, an opening statement that gets the reader super interested. Make it "salty." The goal is for the admissions committee to read it and want to find out more about you. Write drunk and edit sober. No editing, just write. If it's hard to write, talk it out and record it on your phone. Start talking about your key experiences where you interacted with a patient that solidified why you wanted to become a physician. Show, don't tell. Talk about your experiences instead of saying "I am..." You don't have to write from start to finish. Always edit for grammar and typos. Q:  What questions can you ask during an interview or while on admissions tours to find out more about the school? A:  You can't be faulted for asking questions. Avoid boring questions. Ask an insightful question that will stimulate discussion. Don't be afraid of asking hard, opinion-based questions.Check out Session 19 where Dr. Wagner talks about questions to ask. For tours, ask the medical student what they don't like or they find challenging being a medical student in that school. Students are the best people to ask questions to. If you have questions, go to medicalschoolhq.net/questions. Leave us an audio feedback or shoot us an email from there. Links and Other Resources: MSHQ 019: Interview with a Medical School Interview and Admissions Expert MSHQ 023 : Interview with Dr. Polites of MedPrep at Wash. U. MSHQ 035 : How to Fix an App After Starting Premed Poorly MSHQ 047 : Avoid Burnout as a Premed, Med Student and Beyond MSHQ 068: The Changing Landscape of Medical School Admissions Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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47 min
July 9, 2014
85: Pros and Cons of the Liberal Arts for Premeds
Session 85 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison tackle the article on KevinMD.com called Why Premedical Students Need Liberal Arts written by Armaan Rowther who also runs a blog called Medical Madrasa. Rowther wrote this article based on a commencement speech given by Fareed Zakaria at Sarah Lawrence College. KevinMD.com is a great website which could offer great insights featuring a broad range of articles from various professions - physicians, medical students, nurses, physical therapists, patients, healthcare advocates, and more. You actually don't have to be a "premed" major. In fact, you can major in anything and still go to medical school as long as you get the premed requirements. Listen in as Ryan and Allison weigh out the pros and cons of being a liberal arts major which are also listed below.. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Pros: Skills gained Writing skills are critical especially in writing your personal statement during medical school application. Moreover, there is so much paperwork in medicine so having this skill set is essential. Better relationship with patients with better patient outcome A ton of research shows that the communication between a physician and a patient drastically affects the patient's outcome. Hence, being able to bond and relate with them, makes it more beneficial to both your patient and your satisfaction. Non-traditional students have this bonus. Social skills and understanding moral ethics Several liberal arts classes talk about what it means to be human as well as tackle issues with your peers concerning different cultures and people. Having good exposure to this helps foster your social and communication skills. Communication is really huge when dealing with patients. In fact, MCAT is now adding the social sciences as part of their holistic medical school admissions requirements to try to understand applicants better. The ability to have intellectual discussions with others In liberal arts, it allows you to have better intellectual discussions where you're able to discuss your point of view with other's point of view and have the ability to listen to other's point of view. Better environment Being a premed student exposes you to a cutthroat environment for which a number of students stop being premeds because of the environment and the "negativity" around being a premed. And being in liberal arts saves you from being exposed to this. The ability to tackle the more complex questions facing physicians. As a non-science person, you get to learn more about how the world works on a personal level unlike those of the hard sciences who are more likely to learn about life on the molecular level. Cons: Lack of exposure to the hard sciences. The MCAT is supposed to answer the question whether you're able to handle the hard sciences. Check out Episode 16 about Mt. Sinai's FlexMed program. You have to be prepared for the amount of culture shock. the cutthroat environment in medical school may be lessened but it's still there. Writing skills are not really used in medical school. You can just use these skills that you've learned for years and worked hard for to obtain. Allison recalls only to have written just one paper in her medical school years. Lack of exposure to a collaborative environment with other premed students Since you're only one of the very few premeds in the liberal arts world, you could be missing out on that collaborative environment to be around other premed students who are on the same path as you. A different test-taking environment in medical school Liberal arts tests generally involve writing and your thoughts where you're evaluated based on your thought process while in medical school, it's more constant and more on multiple choice tests. In medical school, you become a professional test taker. Links and Other Resources: Join the Academy - The Best Premed Advising Community KevinMD.com Article: Why premedical students need the liberal arts KevinMD.com Armaan Rowther's blog: Medical Madrasa | Reflections as a Muslim Medical Student MCAT 2015 - Everything you Need to Know about the New MCAT | The Medical School Headquarters Holistic Review - Initiatives - AAMC MSHQ 016 : Interview with Mount Sinai - All About FlexMed | The Medical School Headquarters Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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47 min
July 2, 2014
84: The Role of Residency Training For Physicians
Session 84 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about an article recently released in The St. Louis Post-Dispatch about some legislation being passed in Missouri where graduating medical students may be allowed to skip internship or residency and straightly go into practicing medicine. Ryan and Allison express their views about the article as well as walk us through the path to becoming physicians, their training, and insights. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: The traditional path to going into clinical practice:: Four years of training (Three for some) First two years of medical school are classroom-based Third and fourth year - devoted to time caring for patients in the wards Matching to find out where you're going for your residency training Internship (Which is actually your first year of residency) 2-6 additional years of residency training Two routes: Become an attending physician Do a fellowship (which allows you to sub-specialize) then become an attending physician You need at least an internship to be able to get a full medical license where you can practice on your own. The impetus behind Missouri’s bill: Missouri clamors for more doctors. 500 students didn't match so there lies a shortage of residency spots for students graduating from medical school. Missouri seeks to employ these graduating students who have not completed residency training since they are technically doctors. The ruling creates a new classification in their state licensure called the "Assistant Physician." The Missouri legislature has already approved this measure (as of June 23, 2014) What is an assistant physician? Someone who is licensed by the State and Board of Healing Arts and is allowed to practice primary care and prescribe medications in rural and underserved areas of the state. A practicing physician will be supervising the assisting physician for only one single month. What medical school does not teach you: How to be a doctor How to practice medicine Medical school only teaches you education, the foundation and the framework for medicine. What you get from residency training: More responsibilities year after year Graduated supervision (as you progress, you develop more abilities to stand on your own feet and be able to lead) At the end of residency, you are pretty much an attending physician Confidence of having the backup of residents, fellows, and attending physicians supporting you Mentorship Learning different styles The red flag of practicing medicine in a rural and underserved areas of the state: A disservice to the patients because you are practicing medicine to sick patients without supervision The importance of pattern recognition: You will learn through repetition. The 10,000-hour philosophy: Based on Malcolm Gladwell's book, The Outliers that follows the 10,000-hour rule to become great at your field (That's equivalent to 4,160 hours a year a resident gets) Residency is a minimum of 3 years which gives about 12,000 hours Without residency training, you will have to work 5 years to reach that same level of hours in training More insights from Ryan and Allison: Why can't a PA or NP fill this role? Why is the supervision just for a month? Other states only require one year of internship before going out in practice Not every state will let you practice medicine with just one year of internship. Physician shortage is a fact. Something's gotta give. But it always has to be of the benefit of the patients. Final words: Work some type of "team" into the solution otherwise there would be a lack of support network and lack of ability for the physician to keep learning. Links and Other Resources: Article about Assistant Physicians Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: The Story of Success Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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36 min
June 25, 2014
83: How One UF Premed Student is Changing Patient's Lives
Session 83 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Alex Breslin, a premed student at the University of Florida studying Biology. He started the "Dream Team," a nonprofit organization run by students where they volunteer with pediatric patients in the cardiac care unit at UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville. Medical school application is highly competitive where it absolutely pays if you stand out, which Alex did by starting this Dream Team. Today, he shares with us why he started it, who he reached out to, and how all this inspiring endeavor came about. Providing 1500 hours a day, 6 days a week of volunteers, draw upon Alex' experiences and maybe you could start something similar at your campus, at your hospital. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Alex: Alex's journey to medical school: Shadowing a physician and seeing the compassion involved Went on a medical mission trip in the Dominican Republic (He remembers sitting in the jungle and really feeling he was making a difference) His decision on going to University of Florida Getting advice from older students Currently studying for the MCAT (Kaplan and Examkracker books) How Alex conceived the Dream Team: Becoming a Shands volunteer where you get to hang out with kids in the hospital Spending time with one particular kid with brain cancer and understanding the need for bringing more students into the hospital to interact with the kids What is the Dream Team? Dream Team is a nonprofit organization that specializes in pediatric cardiology where they seek to brighten the experience of the current children in cardiac care by donating their time and attention to the kids. Asking for help: Setting the foundation of the future organization The importance of networking (reached out to the physician he shadowed and other physicians in different pediatric units) Getting the hospital involved and bringing in volunteers: Tons of meetings (2-min elevator spiels) Shout out to Ms. Chris Brown, the director of the Child Life Program (who has helped him tremendously) Everything has to be very organized and fundamentally sound Initially, they were given the ok signal to bring in 10 volunteers until eventually bringing in more volunteers What is the Child Life Program? Child Life deals with any volunteer specifically interacting with children (a subspecialty within Shands volunteer) Recruiting the first ten volunteers: Reaching out to the UF population through the internet (Facebook, emails, etc.) Creating a solid Facebook page Strict application cycle + interviews Some pieces of advice for premed students who want to stand out: Focus on embracing the journey you have as an undergrad rather than just the outcome. Be involved in organizations and activities that are making a difference. Links and Other Resources: Dream Team UF Dream Team UF Volunteer Application Shands Child Life Program Child Life Program Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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35 min
June 18, 2014
82: 10 Premed Resources You Need to be Using
Session 82 With too much information found on the internet today, it could be challenging to sort and sift the best and most trusted sources of information that you need along your journey to medical school. In today's episode, Ryan talks about the Top 10 Resources premed students need to be going to for information. Top 10 Resources for Premed Students Access to other premed students, medical students, and physicians Collaborate with other premed students. Two heads are better than one. Older students are great sources of information because they have just gone through the process so they'll be honest with you. Twitter is a great avenue for you to connect with other students and even physicians. Follow Ryan @medicalschoolhq and search for keywords like #premed, #mcat, #futuredoctor, #medschool, etc. You get to jump into conversations that allow you to learn, share your views, and then move on to the next conversation. Student Doctor Network (SDN) Features various forums for everyone in the medical field. Also a great resource for secondaries where they have a wide database of previous questions on secondaries which have been contributed by past students. Warning!!! Don't get sucked into the vortex of SDN. While the site provides a lot of great information, the premed forum particularly, contains a lot of cutthroat negativity that could greatly affect your self-esteem as it relates to your path to medical school. So tread lightly. OldPreMeds.org The opposite of SDN, this site has a very nontraditional crowd that many nontraditional students can gather great information from although traditional student are also welcome to check it out. The organization just had their 14th annual conference in the Washington, D.C. area. Premed advisors Specific answers to questions Access to premed advisors can be real challenging but start with your premed advisors since they would have the pulse on the situation. Understand that not all classes are built the same. Hence, these advisors can give you the specific answers to your questions regarding courses that you need to be taking. Committee letter They can also help you with your committee letter (your premed office gathers all the letters of recommendation and writes a single committee letter to be submitted with your applications). Books MSAR (Medical School Admission Requirements) book - This is a must-have for allopathic medical schools (MD). College Information Book (CIB) -For osteopathic schools (DO) AACOM and AAMC American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) - for DO schools Association of American Medical Colleges - for Osteopathic/MD schools (Texas has a separate medical and dental school application service called TMDSAS.) Both are great sources of information. AAMC creates the MCAT so they have all the information about 2015 MCAT including practice tests. All of these sites have instructions for applications. Read them before you even start applying to save you a ton of time. Medical schools Different schools have different rules on interacting with applicants versus premed students. Don't be afraid to ask questions. They're not off-limits. They have advisors who are there for you so use them. Reddit This website is more of a self-controlled resource that allows you to vote for responses Check out AMAs (Ask Me Anything) where you can ask a certain person just about anything. The Medical School HQ Academy At the Academy, we are your own premed advisor with monthly office hours featuring a video chat that allows you to ask questions and other people asking questions and help answer questions. We have a community forum that contains great discussions. It's  non-anonymous so it's a great environment. Go to jointheacademy.net today! YOU Trust yourself. Trust your instincts and use the information you have to best figure out your path. Here's one additional great resource: Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. What resources have you used on your path? Share it with us and leave a comment. Links and Other Resources: MSHQ 74: 1st Year of Medical School for a Non-Traditional Premed MSHQ 77: Starting the Journey to Med School at 38, taking the First Steps schools.studentdoctor.net for a database of questions on secondaries Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! We are also on Android! Listen to us using your Android device clicking on the Android icon right in our homepage. http://medicalschoolhq.net/ Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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32 min
June 11, 2014
81: Reviewing the 2014 Physician Compensation Report
Session 81 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison review the 2014 Physician Compensation Report from Medscape. Every year, Medscape.com puts out a survey laying out various information including compensation based on different specialties, physician satisfaction, etc. with 24,000 physicians in 25 different specialties as respondents. Listen in as Ryan and Allison share some of the results that came up as well as their insights. This gives you a great way to see what's going through the minds of a lot of physicians, what their life looks like, and understand their challenges so use this as a tool and data point. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Highest paid vs. lowest paid Highest paid: Orthopedics ($413,000 a year) Lowest paid: HIV infectious disease specialist ($174,000 a year) Everything on top is procedure-based while the bottom includes those at the front lines taking care of patients and doing preventive medicine (primary care physician, pediatrician, psychiatrist, neurologist). By gender Half of graduating physicians are female 61% of women physicians are under 45 vs. 38% of men Women earn less than men across jobs By geographical location Northeast being the least compensated Surplus of physicians in the Boston area By practice setting A physician practicing in an academic teaching hospital makes less than someone in private practice By feeling of fair compensation 50% of physicians feel that they're fairly compensated while the other half feel they're not Job satisfaction by specialty: 52% of primary care physicians feel they're fairly compensated (note that they're making the least amount of money yet they feel more compensated than the rest) 63% of dermatologists feel the most compensated Plastic surgeons feel the least compensated (they're no.7 on the list of highest paid) Ryan stresses that the numbers don't always tell the whole story and raises these points: How much is enough? What exactly are the reasons these physicians don't feel fairly compensated? What is their overall debt load? Discussing the cost of treatment with patients 40% of physicians discuss it occasionally Case managers and the financial department can take care of this 5% never talk about it because they don't feel it's appropriate Hours per week spent seeing patients Majority sees patients 30-40 hours a week 6% see patients more than 65 hours a week Time spent with patients Average of 13-16 minutes spent with each patient What is concierge medicine? This refers to a system wherein smaller number of patients pay a large sum of money out of pocket so they can have more time and attention from the physician. Hours spent on paperwork and administration Majority spends almost 10 hours a week doing paperwork and admin stuff If you had to do it all over again, would you choose medicine as a career, the same specialty, and the same practice setting? 58% would choose medicine as a career again Don't freak out! There is hope. In 2012, a Forbes article talks about a survey where 30,000 took a poll and says that 32% in the U.S. wanted to find new work. It's not just in medicine that people are dissatisfied. This could be a growing epidemic of the "shiny toy syndrome." 47% would choose the same specialty again Ryan points out: Is the system broken in terms of choosing a specialty? By compensation and level of happiness: Orthopedics: 44% HIV, Internal medicine, family practice: 67-68% Some pieces of advice for premed students: Choose something that you're passionate about and you care about and not something that's going to make the most amount of money. Links and Other Resources: 2014 Medscape Physician Compensation Report Check out ZDogg's Turntable Health Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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49 min
June 3, 2014
80: 3 Application Cycles, and Now, Finally a Medical Student!
Session 80 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Danielle Ward as she shares about her own share of successes and failures in taking the MCAT 4 times along with 3 attempts of applying to medical school spanning over 5 years to finally get an acceptance where she is starting this Fall at the Georgia Campus of Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Danielle's story is a perfect example of perseverance. Probably the biggest lesson gleaned from this episode is that you don't have to wait things to happen to you. Instead, you have to go out and make things happen for you. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Danielle: Danielle's journey to medical school: Volunteering for the hurricane Katrina victims during her Freshman year as her defining moment to pursue medicine at the Louisiana State University Mapping out her four-year plan around medicine Joining organizations centered around medicine, volunteering, and community services to show her interest in becoming a physician Danielle's challenges along the way: Giving birth to her daughter during Sophomore year Low GPA Marital issues Studying for the MCAT - working two jobs, taking care of her toddler, and attending classes so studying went on the back burner Danielle took the MCAT four times Tools Danielle used to prep for the MCAT: Examkrackers AAMC practice test and assessment How she prepared for the second application: List everything to identify all your weaknesses or something you left out. Danielle took a research position in parasitology and immunology Managing everything with a child: Time management - When you don't have a choice, find a way to make it happen. Flexible grad school experience: Took her masters in biochemistry Took an online grad school program at University of St. Joseph in West Hartford Connecticut On her 3rd application to medical school: She was previously rejected at PCOM - Georgia Campus but she already had the research, publications, hospital volunteering plus her grad school GPA (which did the magic for her!) Retook the MCAT, didn't do as well (but got her physics up) The benefits of online classes: Accountability Weekly discussion boards Weekly 5-page essays (minimum) What helped her get a high grad school GPA: Structure Effort Independent learning Why Danielle thinks her MCAT scores never budged: Overthinking questions and not really paying attention to them Burnout Not doing enough practice questions Some pieces of advice for premed students: Don't get discouraged. Find a support system. Ask for help. And if you get rejected, find out what you did wrong and try to make it work and go back at it again. Everybody has different learning styles. So be flexible as you progress through the ranks. Links and Other Resources: PCOM - Georgia Campus If you would like to follow along on Danielle's journey, please check out her blog: www.aspiringminoritydoctor.com Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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46 min
May 28, 2014
79: Premed Life Mag Partners with the Medical School HQ Podcast!
Session 79 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Tasheema Prince, founder of Premed Life Magazine, as she shares about her decision to take a detour from medicine, how she went about with medical writing, the beginnings of PremedLife Magazine, and its partnership with the Premed Years Podcast. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Tasheema: Tasheema's initial interest in medicine: Studying in New York and began her premed path as a biology major Volunteering experience Realizing medicine wasn't her passion during her Senior year Discovered medical writing as a career she can actually pursue combining her love of medicine and science with her love of writing Pivoting to medical writing: Landing a job after college at a medical publishing company where they publish magazines for healthcare practitioners, nurses, etc. Using this as a stepping stone to her own endeavors On Premed Life Magazine: Has been living inside of her since undergrad Seeing the need for resources and information in a fresh, interesting light Finally publishing it in September 2010 Premed Life Magazine's mission: To provide relevant, timely information to anyone aspiring to gain admission to medical school. Updates since its first publishing in 2010: Digital and print editions With 40,000+ digital readers More and more submissions from premed students who want to share their tips, advice, and experiences Campus Edition - content specifically for students officer in campus Premed Life Magazine welcomes article submissions from students, directors, deans, physicians, and just about anybody who wishes to contribute to the site. If you are an aspiring writer or you have a story to tell, submit a guest post or provide your input by clicking on Share Your Thoughts on their site. The Medical School HQ podcast and Premed Life Magazine have combined forces and MSHQ podcast is now the official podcast of the Premed Life Magazine. Links and Other Resources: Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. You may go to your premed advising office and suggest to get a magazine at the school by sending an email to info@premedlife.com. Top schools producing medical school applicants Most viewed posts in Premed Life Magazine: The Best Cities for Med School Highly Effective Habits of Premed Students Session 07: 10 Traits You Need to Succeed in Medical School Connect with Premed Life on Twitter @premedlife and Facebook. If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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33 min
May 21, 2014
78: The Dark Side of Medical Education: Premed Through Residency
Session 78 Ryan and Allison talk about the dark side of medical education which starts in the premed world with "goners" as most people know them. Additionally, the Academic Medicine Journal published by the AAMC also released several articles talking about medical student mistreatment based on the responses to the medical school graduation questionnaire. Listen in to help you become more aware of the dark side of things in the medical school journey and what you can do to deal with each challenge that comes along the way. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: The Dark Side of the premed world: Scut work Scut work is an activity that is asked of you without any educational value or doesn't involve any direct patient care (ex. cleaning up bodily fluids, getting coffee for a resident, picking up laundry) The "gunner" philosophy Gunners make it miserable for everyone. They are the people who will tear you down and write things on the forum just to make other people bad. They will purposefully sabotage and cut down everybody else to gain an advantage. The Dark Side of Medical School: Mistreatment of medical students 17-20% of medical students report mistreatment Huge increase in the percentage of students aware of the school's policy on mistreatment from 50% in 2000 to 89% in 2011; however, there was no increase in the percentage of students reporting any mistreatment. Factors for students not reporting mistreatment: Medicine as hierarchical in nature People think this is normal Pimping PIMP is an acronym for Put In My Place. Historically, pimping is a way for an attending physician or resident to ask questions about disease processes or surgical procedures to test your knowledge during rotations; which is something that you really need to prepare for. Pimping vs. berating Pimping has the goal to try to educate you on the value of coming prepared for a case but it's a different story when the physician is already cussing to the point of berating you. Don't be afraid to speak up if you feel you're being berated. Duty Hours The cheap labor of residents. As a resident, you're being paid roughly 10/hour for heavy work. Subjective Grading Majority of grades are calculated based on the subjective evaluation of residents and attending physicians supervising you on the wards. A lot of education you have in your 3rd and 4th year are provided by your residents and sometimes they may not be the best teachers. Some pieces of advice for premed students: If you are mistreated, speak up. Do not put up with it. Have you ever been mistreated? What have you done about it? Share it with us by leaving a comment. Links and Other Resources: Academic Medicine Journal Session 17: Step Up Your MCAT Prep With the Princeton Review Why Failing Med Students Don’t Get Failing Grades - New York Times Article The Princeton Review - Save 10% off of the MCAT Ultimate Classroom or Live Online Course - Promo Code 2 minutes in! If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq and email Allison allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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47 min
May 14, 2014
77: Starting the Journey to Med School at 38, Taking the First Steps
Session 77 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Ben Abney, a true nontraditional medical student who sent in a 4,000+-word email titled How a 38-Year Old Active Duty Applicant with a Family and Average Scores Got into Medical School, with the hope to help other people who may also find themselves in a similar situation. Listen closely to this episode and learn first-hand about Ben's journey, the things he learned, and his recommendations that might help you in your premed and medical school journey. It's all about taking that first step! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ben: Ben's path prior to medical school: Joining the navy after graduation and becoming a nuclear power instructor Money as a barrier, growing up in a very poor family Figuring out the next steps: Which resources did he tap into? Local medical schools - admissions committees Personal physician friends Medical school forums OldPreMeds.org Conference Ways to reach out to the schools: Go to the site and familiarize yourself about the basic information about the school. Email the admissions office and do a quick summary. Just show up and meet faces. During the application process: Applying as soon as the AMCAS application cycle opened Writing the personal statement and just briefly mentioning the highlights Getting his schools to get all of his transcripts to AMCAS as very challenging Note: Asking for letters of recommendation past April is too late Applying to around 15 MD schools Got into 7-8 interviews Some pieces of advice for premed students: There is no such thing as safety schools. You can't only apply to schools that meet numbers. Apply early. Apply broadly. Dream don't come true but plans do. So put a plan out there. Take that first step and see if it's something you like or dread. Start looking at your dream and make it a plan. Links and Other Resources: Old Premeds Conference MSHQ 074 - Interview with Carrie Session 17: Step Up Your MCAT Prep With the Princeton Review The Princeton Review - MCAT Ultimate Classroom or Live Online Course If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
May 7, 2014
76: 5 Traits Patients Want Their Doctors to Have
Session 76 Back in Session 62, Allison talked about how it was being a patient after being diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Now it's Ryan's turn to take the patient's seat being diagnosed with a lesion in his spinal cord. In today's episode, Ryan and Allison share some lessons they've learned which they hope to pass on to you as you go through your premedical or medical education so you can hold on to them once you're practicing. Ryan and Allison have put together 5 traits that make a good physician (from a patient's point of view). Don't be negligent. Besides the fact that you can be sued for this, it could be disastrous for the patient. Always get back to a patient especially when you need to read some findings. Look at each patient as a person, not a number. Use data to try to drive how to treat patients but patients are people and every case is different. Treat each one individually as a human being and not as a number or case. Cater to their individual needs and concerns. Be willing to understand the research but deviate from it when needed or when a patient is different. Just be straightforward. Level with people. Remove the doctor-patient divide. Do not condescend and talk down to people. Be mindful of the stress and chaos going through your patients. Be aware that what you do everyday is normal for you, not for the patient. Typically, they're in a state of chaos as benign as it may be. So you need to disperse the information to them and at the same time reflect on what they're going through. Patients can easily google things but explain certain terminologies to them to give them security and a better understanding. Integrate clinical knowledge with research knowledge. Even if you're a research-based physician, remember that you are healer and you need to embody that when you're seeing patients. Change your mindset when you go to the office and you're with a patient. The SOAP acronym when taking notes: Subjective (Patient history) Objective (Physical exam) Assessment (Differential diagnosis) Plan (What you're going to do about it) Ryan and Allison modified the SOAP acronym when taking notes into SOAPIER: Subjective Objective Assessment Plan Intimate Empathy Reflect In the end, as Ryan was walking out the door his neurologist took 5 seconds to put her hand on his arm and tell him that's he's going to be okay and that made all the difference to him as a patient. Ultimately, just be a person. Links and Other Resources: Session 062: Allison's Story - When the Doctor Becomes the Patient Session 056: Taking Care of Patients in Today's Electronic World Session 050: 16 Golden Rules of Medicine If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq and email Allison at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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37 min
April 30, 2014
75: What are My Chances of Getting into Med School?
Session 75 In today's episode, Ryan goes on to have a heart-to-heart talk with YOU to hopefully put your mind at ease. What are my chances of getting into medical school? This is the ultimate question every premed student has. But this is a stressful question that is an ultimate waste of energy, stress, and time. Now here's the ultimate response. Your chance of getting to medical school is 0% if you don't apply. If you do apply, your chances of getting to medical school are 100% individual to your application. You’re 100% different. You are an individual applicant applying to individual schools based on your preferences. Your application tells a story that is 100% different than every other application submitted. Your personal statement, letters of recommendation, experiences, and reasons are different. Remember, what you do is not important. WHY you do it means so much more. It's that why that separates you from everybody else. And that's what's going to come across in your personal statement and interview. Tell your why. Your "why" is more powerful than your numbers. Do your best in your MCAT and GPA but figure out why you're doing this to be able to tell a much better story than anybody else. It's okay not to have the perfect MCAT or GPA. It's not all about the numbers. It's about your story. Find your story. Build your story. Tell your story. We now have 100,000 downloads on iTunes! Thank you to everyone who's taking the time to listen to us each week. Help spread this podcast to others. Links and Other Resources: Session 74 - Carrie talking about her WHY AAMC Data Simon Sinek - Ted Talk - Start with Why If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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21 min
April 23, 2014
74: 1st Year of Medical School For A Non-Trad Premed
Session 74 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Carrie, who's finishing her 1st year in medical school, and she shares with us her very nontraditional path into medicine, coming from a corporate world and being married with three daughters, as well as the power of surrounding herself with like-minded individuals through OldPreMeds.org. Additionally, she discusses her experience in medical school and how having that purpose has helped her push through tougher times. Loads of inspiration and wisdom from our guest today so stay tuned! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Carrie: Carrie's first year of medical school: "Drinking from the fire hose" Content is not that much harder, but it's the volume The most challenging time of her life Exam-after-exam Carrie's hardest part of 1st year in medical school: Logistics Strategies Carries to overcome the hurdles: Organization and time management One step at a time: Be conscious about your minutes. Know how to ask for help. Recorded lectures at their school allow her to speed them up or down as needed. Carrie's life prior to med school: Worked right after college Carrie is married with 3 kids Had a 2-hour conversation with the surgeon of his brother who had brain cancer (that was the light bulb moment for her!) Went through different careers in counseling, business, and spending 10 years in healthcare administration Having that nagging voice to pursue medicine Carrie's husband did a career change to go after something he's passionate about. Once accomplished, he told Carrie it was her turn and asked Carrie these powerful questions: "If time and money were absolutely not a factor, what would you want to do? What is it that makes your heart beat?" Carrie knew immediately that she's always wanted to be a physician. And here she is! Beyond helping people: Carrie's "why" that drives her to become a doctor You can have any job and help people so there has to be something else. Combining her pursuit of knowledge and her proverbial heart Carrie's "why" was being able to walk with people in some of their deepest pain and the scariest moment of their lives and to be that person who can help facilitate them through that process Steps Carrie took to prepare for the application process: Researching medical schools she was interested in. Figuring out what their admissions criteria were Getting a ton of wisdom from OldPreMeds.org Taking refresher courses to prepare for the MCAT (at a state university) Calling the Dean of Admissions and laid out her plans and asked everything she needed to know and do to get accepted Being professional and being respectful of their time and being as concise as possible Contacted them every 4-6 months to keep the relationship going The benefits of the OldPreMeds.org community: Getting advice and wisdom Being able to look eye-to-eye with people who have gone before you and who are in the same place in your journey Meeting people who are behind you in the journey so you can also help them Having the support of like-minded people around you Golden nuggets of wisdom from Carrie: Don't be better than everyone applying, be different! What sets you apart? You always have the option to say no but not if you don't go through the process. So give yourself as many choices as you can." Everybody's place is different and you can't understand something unless you're a part of it." Work as a team and as a family to get through this. We're going to medical school, all of us, we just have different roles. Lean on the community and people around you. Learn to ask for help. Formulate a plan and be willing to change that plan as often as it needs to be changed. Some pieces of advice to those who wish to start their own journey: Don't allow fear to formulate speed bumps or walls that aren't really there. Take a step and see what happens. Keep walking until you are convinced it isn't what you want to be. Links and Other Resources: OldPreMeds - The National Society for Nontraditional Premedical & Medical Students OldPreMeds National Conference UC Davis Premed & Prehealth Conference If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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42 min
April 8, 2014
73: A Non-Traditional Path Into Medical School
Session 73 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Jordan, a member of the Academy and a nontraditional student starting medical school this Fall. In his undergrad years, he was a student athlete and started as a premed. He tried looking into other career fields yet he kept coming back to medicine. Today, Jordan shares his experiences, why he ultimately decided to pursue medicine, and getting sidetracked after o-Chem. Learn about the thought processes Jordan used which you can also apply to your own situation. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Jordan: Jordan's path prior to medical school: The thrill of dissecting a cat during anatomy class in high school Being a student athlete playing baseball Being exposed to physical therapy Getting a B in o-Chem which caused him to second-guess and consider other options The amount of time needed to commit to premed classes caught him off-guard Having a 5-year plan after he graduated Shadowing a physical therapist and realizing it's not what he wanted to do Shadowing PA's, applied in the PA program, and turned it down before taking the MCAT Shadowing different physicians and finally realizing it's what he wanted to do Listening to this podcast has helped him realize he wanted to go to medical school The difference between shadowing PA's and physicians: The level of cases Physicians being in the leadership role Applying for the AMCAS: The importance of starting early (Ryan recommends waiting a day or two to make sure there are no kinks in the system) Making sure everything is correct (personal statement, etc) Using digital storing solution, Interfolio, for letters of recommendation Choosing schools to apply to: Download the MSAR to check out the list of schools and their corresponding stats Applying to schools he thought he would fit in In the end, Jordan applied to 23 schools, took 4 interviews, and got 2 acceptances at military medical school (USUHS) and the Medical College of Wisconsin On getting the HPSP scholarship Understanding the need for flexibility Concerns about giving up your 'freedom' The possibility of not being able to go to the residency you want to go to Some pieces of advice for premed students: Be patient. Don't be afraid to take some time to really explore what you want. Take a year off to get a real world perspective of what's it's like to be a non-student. Links and Other Resources: If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Also tweet Allison @allison_mshq.
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38 min
April 7, 2014
72: A Look Into the Pharma Industry with a Chief Medical Officer
Session 72 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Al Sandra, Chief Medical Officer and Senior Vice President of Development Sciences at Biogen Idec where he oversees clinical development in neurological and immunological diseases, global regulatory affairs, global safety and benefit risk management, global clinical development operations and biometrics. Today, Al talks about his journey in the pharmaceutical industry, its bad-rap from other physicians, and what you as a premed student can start doing to get some experience in the industry. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Al: Al's path to medicine: Al's initial drive and passion for medicine coming from a family of physicians Attending Stanford University and initially having an interest in psychiatry Working in a lab for a child psychiatrist Applying to Harvard medical school and MD-PhD program Al's defining moment when his uncle died of heart attack at a young age and sparked his interest in improving medicine The stigma about premeds that exists up to this day Strong anti-pharma sentiment: The Dark Side of the Pharma Industry Al holds the theory of people have the idea of pharma companies being for profit companies are trying to make profits from sick people. Al's extensive medical experience: On Al's residency training: One year of internal medicine & 2 years of neurology Did a fellowship in neuromuscular disease Electromyography training Board certified in neurology and electrodiagnostic medicine Became an instructor in Neurology at Harvard Became assistant professor and started a lab at Massachusetts General Hospital Doing clinical work mixed with laboratory work and teaching Dipping his toes into the pharma industry: Met a guy who started his own company where he was part of the scientific advisory board building prototypes Getting intrigued by the idea of making products Finding the satisfaction of making products in a team setting Meeting colleagues who moved to the pharma industry who seem to be happy Seeing a Biogen advertisement looking for a neurologist and deciding to apply for it Response from his colleagues about going to the pharma industry: Many felt he was making a big mistake and one colleague said he'd be undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death) Others (especially older professors) were supportive of his big leap Opportunities in the pharma industry for physicians: Fellowship programs Summer internships (laboratory work, clinical trials, etc.) Opportunities for non-research buffs: Clinical development Drug safety Medical affairs Global regulatory affairs You may still continue clinical practice even when you're involved in the pharma industry. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Follow your passion. Look in your heart and ask yourself what do you really want to do. Don't worry about what others say. Links and Other Resources: If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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36 min
April 2, 2014
71: Crushing the Myths of TV Doctor Dramas
Session 71 Ryan and Allison bust some myths and point out several inaccuracies in many TV doctor shows. They also paint some pictures of what real life is really like for a physician during residency and as an attending physician. ER The closest to portraying medical life as accurately as it could Allison thinks it's a fantastic show Creator Michael Crichton was a physician himself before being a writer Shows real people, doctors, nurses, medical assistants, medical students and portraying pain, patient cases and problems, and what it can look like when patients are treated for those problems. Scrubs Good at mimicking real life even as a comedy Also close to what life is like as a physician Based off the place where Allison did her internship Busting the Myths and All the Medical Inaccuracies: Grey's Anatomy Sex - Everybody is having sex. Relationships with patients - Big No-No Relaxing in the middle of the day - There is never a time for sunbathing. You are either rushing to a cafeteria or a conference Fighting over the operating room - This is too cutthroat. General surgery makes you do all different sub-specialties - Not true. Too much drama and tragedies House The same physician is doing everything - This is a huge pet peeve. Breaking into people's house - Physicians don't have that authority. House as the head of diagnostic medicine - All physicians are diagnosticians. Treatment as diagnosis - You don't throw treatments at people and decide that's the diagnosis. House's addiction problems - Paints a physician in a bad light House's bedside manner - Totally not a role model; he completely demeans people So here's what a TRUE day in the life of a physician would be: Allison's day: Primarily outpatient-based with inpatient consultation work at a local hospital Seeing patients for whom a neurology consult has been requested (ex. stroke, migraine, seizure) in the ER, wards, ICU Inpatient time gives her the opportunity to interact with residents and medical students, and the team she works with. In the outpatient world, she also works with a team made up by a receptionist, office manager, and medical assistants. She sees an average of 10-12 patients a day. It basically depends on the day; sometimes she sees 4 patients in a day, sometimes 18 where she encounters new patients and follow ups. Administrative stuff can take a lot of your time. Patient phone calls Responding to primary care physicians Signing orders and prescriptions Arguing with insurance companies Responding to requests from pharmacies *Statistics shows interns spend only 11% of the time on direct one-on-one patient care while the big chunk of time is spent on administrative stuff. Understand what you're getting yourself into. Patient care + everything else involved such as: Computer-based training Re-certifications Maintaining your medical education units (if you're board certified) Updating insurance companies every 90 days of your practice and all your numbers so you get reimbursed What is a scribe? A position where a person can come in and be hired to run around with a physician to document for the physician what's going on during the patient visit. Ryan's day: Primary care (Dealing with patients, questions, and labs; Calling in for medication refills) Ryan refers patients to specialists (like Allison) More TV show inaccuracies: Patient in a coma  - In the real world, patients in a coma need breathing tubes and need to be incubated Shocking people who are flat-lining How to put on a stethoscope Links and Other Resources: If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq.
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43 min
March 25, 2014
70: 7 Tips to Running a Successful Family Meeting
Session 70 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about family meetings, in line with last week's podcast about end-of-life care, and specifically how you're going to communicate that during a family meeting and how to best set up family meetings. During residency, Allison spent a ton of time on a project all about family meetings and end-of-life care. Ryan and Allison believe that giving this kind of education to you will be very helpful as you're about to embark on your medical career. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Allison's internship: Day 3 of internship in the midst of taking care of different patients Inherited a very sick patient who recently came out of the ICU Getting overwhelmed by everything going on with her patient The family wanted to have a meeting Allison recognized she needed help in leading the meeting so she went to her junior resident to ask for help. Tips to Running a Successful Family Meeting: Always prepare. Do your homework. Make sure you know which patient you're talking about (name, where they are). Refresh yourself on what recently just happened with the person. Get with everybody else that has been taking care of the patient. Medicine is a team sport. Understand that it's not all about you. There are nurses, social workers, other physicians, and other specialists that are taking care of this patient. So reach out to them and get information from them about the family. *The patient's nurse must always be a part of the family meeting. They are spending a huge percentage of their day with that patient so they may know the family so much better than you do and understand the finer details. Think about privacy. Although a lot of hospitals now have a lot of dedicated family rooms set up, be careful not to have a big conversation or update with family members next to other people. At the start of the meeting, inquire about their understanding of what's going on with the patient. One of the pitfalls people make when they go into a family meeting is they rush ahead and talk about what's going on while the family doesn't understand what's going. Make sure you're aware of what they know so far so they don't get confused. Avoid the medical jargon. Don't be throwing out medical jargon because the family won't have an idea of what you're talking about. Goals of Care This is an extremely crucial concept although it doesn't necessarily have to enter into every family meeting. This is a meeting about addressing the goals of care. Listen to Session 69 and know more about this. Once you've clarified the family's understanding, talk about the goals of care at this point. Listen and answer questions. Make sure to listen to the patient or the family member. Listen and pause to get a feel of what they're thinking and feeling. Make sure the family is understanding what you're saying. Repeat anything if necessary. Guide the family on this journey. You're there to provide information to them and help them make a decision that will help them as to the next steps of their loved one's care, be it comfort care or changing the goals of care or discussing a new treatment. One last thing... Understand the wishes and desires of the patient as far as DNR/DNI. We all have living wills, regardless of age, because life is unpredictable. A few patients will come into the hospital already with a healthcare proxy or with advanced directives. So be aware of those things. Some pieces of advice for those transitioning into internships: Medicine is no longer paternalistic. You have to come up with the best decision for the patient based on your knowledge, the family's knowledge, and what's best for the patient. Don't offer unreasonable things which are not appropriate. Just because you can doesn't mean you should. Links and Other Resources: Session 69: Palliative Care - There is Always Something You Can Provide If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq.
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32 min
March 19, 2014
69: Palliative Care - There is Always Something You Can Provide
Session 69 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about end-of-life care, which can affect everybody in medicine, whichever point of the medical career path you're in, especially as a resident and a practicing physician wherein you will be encountering patients who are moving forward or at their end-of-life that involves a lot of medical care that really needs to be addressed. For premed students, this could be a potential topic during interviews where a lot of ethical questions can be drawn out from this. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Palliative care, defined To make a disease or symptoms less severe or unpleasant without removing the actual cause of the disease itself. Palliative Care: Its Origins Began with the Hospice Movement Taking care of dying people has been going on for a while In the U.S., palliative care began at Cleveland Clinic and the Medical College of Wisconsin in the 80's 80% of U.S. hospitals with over 300 beds have a hospice program What qualifies for hospice? A patient that would no longer live more than 6 months as assessed by a primary care physician Factors for palliative care: Futility Quality of life The "we can treat" mindset: Out of 120 U.S. cancer center hospitals, only 23% of them have beds dedicated to palliative care. We can't fix anybody and anything. A New England Journal of Medicine in 2010 talked about lung cancer patients with these findings: Patients who received early palliative care experienced less depression and increased quality of life and survived 2.7 months longer on average than those receiving standard oncologic care Why palliative care is important: Helps improve the comfort of the individual and freedom of pain, discomfort, and anxiety The misconception of palliative care as "pulling the plug" or withdrawing care: These terms are widely used but you need to understand that withdrawing care implies removing care from the patient. So this clearly indicates a lack of understanding about end-of-life care because it leaves the patient and the family with a feeling that you're not caring for them anymore. Shifting Your Goals of Care: You're still caring for the patient but it's all about a shift in your goals of care. So you are not "withdrawing" from care. You are still actively managing the patient to aggressively maximize the patient's comfort. Goals of care is a very important concept you can carry with you in your medical training. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Be informed. You will run into terminally ill patients who need your help. When you do have opportunities to receive this kind of education in medical school and as a resident, take in as much as you can. Go and find a family meeting to be a part of and observe. Go to a palliative care talk and find a palliative care team at your hospital and get some experience with that. Links and Other Resources: New England Journal of Medicine 2010 article: Early Palliative Care for Patients with Metastatic Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq and Allison @allison_mshq.
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32 min
March 8, 2014
68: The Changing Landscape of the MCAT and Med School Admissions
Session 68 Dr. Benjamin Chan is the Assistant Dean of Admissions at the University of Utah School of Medicine and currently works as an inpatient attending physician at the University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI). He is also the host of the podcast Talking Admissions and Med Student Life. Today, he shares with us his thoughts on the changing landscape and trends of the medical school admissions process, about nontraditional students, and a look into why requirements are not standardized for all medical schools. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Benjamin: Benjamin's path to medicine: Switching from pre-law to premed at Stanford University Applying to medical school in California while still maintaining his Utah residency Got into University of Utah School of Medicine Knowing he wanted to become a pediatrician until going through his pediatric rotation and not loving it Doing a rotation at child psychiatry, loving it, and deciding to become a child psychiatrist Matching at George Washington University in D.C. Underwent adult training and a 2-year child psychiatry fellowship and matched at University of Maryland in Baltimore Moving to Salt Lake City after graduation for family reasons Reason for switching to medicine on top of helping people: Serving a volunteer mission in France at homeless shelters, nursing homes, orphanages Saw medicine as a much more direct route in helping people Benjamin shadowed different doctors and lawyers but found physicians to have more patient interaction The importance of shadowing: Seeing the lifestyle of a physician - the good and the bad Helps you become prepared for what's in store (how regulated it is and how much training goes into it) Challenges Benjamin had to overcome: Switching from pediatrics to psychiatry Picking your field at the end of your training The importance of mentors: Mentors play a great role in answering student's questions and easing their concerns University of Utah is creating a new program called Core Faculty to help med students through mentors The reason for the different medical school requirements among schools: Schools as fiercely proud institutions AAMC has guidelines but they treat different schools like states with their own kind of experiment going on Medical schools hate students who just check off the box; they like to see the passion, determination, and motivation among students The 5-core criteria at University of Utah School of Medicine: Research experience Community experience Leadership experience Physician shadowing Exposure to patients Shadowing vs. patient exposure: Physician shadowing as a passive activity Interacting with patients Returning phone calls Paperwork for insurance companies Meet with families to break news or explain a procedure Being sensitive to what the lifestyle is like and what it means to be a doctor Patient exposure means getting your hands dirty Interacting with patients (nursing facility, hospice, group homes for children with disabilities, respite care) General Overview of the Medical School Admissions Process: Robust growth of the premedical offices Getting to medical school like going to the Olympics (having coaches and trainers along the way) More and more premed offices are taking a prominent role which provide valuable services: Helping them with mock interviews (traditional and MMI) Reviewing personal statements Identifying students who are interested in medicine and mentoring them for their 3-4 years of undergrad Greater emphasis on behavioral sciences A whole new section for MCAT 2015 with more focus on behavioral sciences (ex. psychology, sociology, anthropology) Medical school curriculum now has more emphasis on the behavioral sciences Nontraditional students fitting in with medical school: Benjamins tags the University of Utah as the "land of nontraditional students" with an average of matriculating students about a year to a year and a half older than across other medicals schools for socio-economic reasons. The admissions committee loves the maturity and wisdom of non-traditional students. Nontraditional students write more passionately about their life experiences. Why he started his own podcast: The craving for information Benjamin has noticed among colleges Conceiving the idea of interviewing people affiliated with the university, premed advisors, and medical students to centralize knowledge and provide equal information to everyone Podcast as a great learning tool being able to learn more about their curriculum, their hospital, and people's lives His podcast's target audience: Premedical students Current medical students *Half is geared to University of Utah while the other half applies to anyone. Benjamin's favorite episodes in his podcast: Conversations about the fun stuff of being a doctor and interacting with colleagues Talking with med students (one episode featuring Kyle talking about male fashion) Some pieces of advice for premed students: Follow your passion. Branch out and go outside your comfort zone. Start volunteering and stick with that. As you get more experience and the people you work with see the leadership within you, you start to be given more responsibilities in the organization. It's not about checking the boxes, but making the world a better place and show the admissions committee what you can do. Links and Other Resources: Dr. Chan’s Bio University of Utah School of Medicine Check out Dr. Benjamin Chan’s podcast Talking Admissions and Med Student Life If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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39 min
March 5, 2014
67: MD/PhD Medical School Program Director Shares What You Need!
Session 67 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Jose Cavazos, the Assistant Dean of the MD/PhD Program at The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio. He is also the Program Director for Clinical Neurophysiology (a fellowship of neurology). Listen in as we show you what premed life is like as a possible MD/PhD student, what a successful applicant looks like to a medical admissions committee member, MD/PhD programs and funding, and life after medical school for the MD/PhD graduate. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Jose: Jose's journey along the MD/PhD path: Starting with an MD and wanting to pursue more research Pushing for a PhD and doing his residency Starting faculty after residency Being an international graduate at a 7-year program in Mexico (Premedical undergrad + medical program) Challenges coming back to the states to practice: More paperwork Questions as to the depth of his knowledge (which pushed him to be on the top 5-10% of his specialty) Considerations in going to an MD/PhD program: If you have the fascination at the specific resource and willingness to contribute as to why certain pathological processes happen If you can sustain research experience for several years What is a wet lab experience? There is a typical, premedical, basic science of medicine that individuals will eventually get PhD's on (ex. chemistry, genetics, molecular biology, physiology, pharmacology, neuroscience, etc.). Wet lab means you do medical research in a laboratory where experiments are taking place, mixing wet solutions. What they're looking for is a research that can assess fundamental questions about the biology of what's going on. Do you have to major in Chemistry or Biology? No. It's possible to be on the Humanities track and the like and do a 1 to 2-year post bac program that involves research experience. Research immersion during the gap year? 5-6 days a week type of immersion for an individual with 2-3 years of research experience from college (full time 10 weeks during the summer and 10-15 hours a week in the semesters) Getting into MD/PhD programs and funding: Going through a series of interviews (invest $5,000-$6,000 for interviews, applications) Entire tuition fees are entirely paid plus a pre-doctoral student stipend ($22,000-$32,000) 45 programs receive NIH funding in a training award called the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) Other NIH awards are individual awards obtained by MD/PhD students Mega-programs have 25 positions per year Medium-sized programs have over 13 positions per year Most programs have 5-10 positions per year The advantages of an MD/PhD student: Don't accumulate debt during their MD/PhD or even after they become residents Having the ability to use the NIH long repayment program where undergrad loans are paid back A mechanism that allows you not to think about financial considerations Other opportunities for an MD/PhD graduate: On the clinical side, you're still able to see patients and still do research You're able to bridge the gap between publications and discoveries Joining pharmaceutical industries where you're able to translate bringing research discoveries into clinical platforms (doing clinical trials, phase I and II studies) A strong candidate for an MD/PhD program: In-depth research Letters of recommendation from research advisors Shadowing Volunteering Research, research, quality research Getting the good stuff when volunteering: You have to earn your stripes. Own some aspects of the research and make it known to the PI's Links and Other Resources: School of Medicine - The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio Dr. Cavazos Profile Page Check out the NIH Postbaccalaureate Research Training Award If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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48 min
February 26, 2014
66: Physician, Paralympic Athlete and So Much More
Session 66 In this episode, Ryan talks with Cheri, an athlete in undergrad who went to Stanford Medical School and is currently in fellowship training at Harvard. Cheri is also an accomplished Paralympic wheelchair racer who has bagged a number of medals for our country. Today, Cheri shares her wonderful journey in becoming a physician, her experiences as a medical student, being a wheelchair user, and how she continues to advocate for people living with disabilities in the medical community, athlete community, and beyond! She also shares with us how becoming a patient affected her as a physician. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Cheri: Her interest in becoming a physician: Growing up on a farm in Iowa Having been influenced by her mom being chief nurse officer for a healthcare network in South Dakota Sustaining a spinal cord injury at a young age which got her exposed to healthcare About her spinal cord injury: Got into a farming accident when she was just a year and a half Had a complete spinal cord injury that she had to utilize a wheelchair for mobility Disability as a factor during her premed path: Going to the University of Arizona primarily to become a student athlete where she can play wheelchair racing Not seeing her disability as a barrier to applying to medical school What premed life was like for Cheri: Big classes and working towards honors degrees Having the goal of finding a way to stand out among all students Juggling of commitments as a student athlete Her biggest struggle as a premed: Not having a natural passion for the more analytical classes like Calculus and Physics where she had to spend extra time in the classes Strategies Cheri used to succeed in premed: Making friends to help each other out as each person has their own strengths and weaknesses Identifying your professors and looking at their teaching style and how they test. Her thought process in selecting a medical school: Getting more involved in her racing career so she was looking for a school that could allow her to continue her training Choosing a school that enabled her to excel and that is more flexible in their curriculum Receiving negative feedback about being in a wheelchair: Due to legal backing, schools are not supposed to ask you about your disability pointblank in an interview The huge grey area is what happens behind closed doors How has her disability made her a better physician: Being in the patient's shoes, it brings everything down to earth in a totally different way It all comes down to being real and having the inherent ability to understand that they are humans, they are who they are, and are experiencing their injury or illness that is personal to them. Cheri's racing career: Began in junior high and carried it through Renting a racing chair and going to a state meet Getting empowered being in a community of wheelchair racers Training at the University of Arizona when she was in college Competing nationally and internationally Joining the Paralympics: Being qualified for her first Paralympics in Sydney when she was undergrad Competed in three Paralympics (Sydney, Athens, and Beijing) Brought home a total of 7 medals - 1 gold, 1 silver, 5 bronze Got into road racing specifically marathon Traveled the world marathon circuit Cheri views sports as a tremendous vehicle to mobility, empowerment, and teaching others around you that it's possible Some pieces of advice for premed students: Think of it as a journey so you will have more fun along the way. Make it fun and fulfilling by examining your background, what brought you there, and your passion. Medicine is very diverse so there are so many ways for you to make an impact and bring your background to the table to make it better. Think about what makes you special and what your passions are. Links and Other Resources: Check out this YouTube video about Cheri: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZrqIGxhFt8 Session 62: Allison's Story - When the Doctor Becomes the Patient If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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48 min
February 19, 2014
65: The 3 Most Common MCAT Questions M Prep Receives
Session 65 In this episode, Ryan talks with Alec Lee, former premed student and co-founder of M Prep, a test prep company established back in 2007. Since then, Alec has been working with MCAT content having taught 1500 hours of coursework with students, being the head instructor of their comprehensive course, and developing most of the course strategy content for the MCAT course. As you probably already know, M Prep is popular for their MCAT Question of the Day which sends an MCAT question right to your email inbox. Today, Alex answers the three most common questions that he receives about the MCAT. 3 Most Common Questions that M Prep Receives: How long should I spend studying for the MCAT? The general rule of thumb is not to study for less than 8 weeks. Take the pre-requisites before the MCAT Students need fewer prerequisites than they're led to believe (No need for calculus or statistics or a semester's worth of organic chemistry). The exam is about critical thinking and application. MCAT is written to be relevant from all sources of backgrounds. It is the great equalizer of GPA, academic, and non-academic factors. The difficulty is in the critical thinking rather than content knowledge. Performance in the courses You don't have to excel in the course to be ready for the MCAT but have a solid understanding of the concepts discussed Have a strong background in biology (although not a requirement). Take advanced courses in biology such as genetics, microbiology, cell biology. Amount of study time By 8 weeks, devote a good 15-30 hours per week for studying If you work full-time or you're really busy that you only get to study 10-15 hours a week, then it should take a longer period of time. Check out the AAMC website and take the free practice MCAT exam and get a sense for yourself where you're sitting at this time. Reasons for under preparing for the exam: Studying too late Studying on time or early but procrastinating They did not #RespectTheMCAT and understand what it was "The MCAT is a game with rules. When you know how to play the game well, you can beat it." Studying for too long vs. studying the wrong way There is no issue if you're studying for too long, but did you study the wrong way? "Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." If you're preparing correctly, you can't spend too much time doing it. It's all about how you think about information and that skill won't decline with time - it will only grow. You might forget content but you can't forget the way you think. Another great pitfall of prep courses in general is the impression that everything made sense when you reviewed it and so you know it and there's no need to review again. By 3 weeks out, you have to go back and make sure it's fresh in your mind Should I take the new MCAT? No. Take the current MCAT. New MCAT starts February 2015. Don't take the MCAT especially if you don't have your prerequisite courses since you won't be ready for the test. Reasons for not taking the new MCAT: Longer exam From 5 hours in the current exam, the new exam will take 7 hours. This requires a lot more of mental stamina. A lot more content. Less physics and chemistry but more content will actually be added than removed - greater chance of having gaps in your knowledge. Roll-outs of brand new major standardized tests see a drop in the scores for 1-2 years after the switch. This happened to the SAT, GRE, GMAT. People generally don't perform as well after a switch until people get more used to the content, there is more publishing, and people have done more time with the new content. MCAT scoring is different. AAMC is not releasing their scoring information until the end of April 2014. Less content available and less expertise. There is only 1 official practice exam as opposed to the current 8. Current MCAT contents existing are obsolete. AAMC give test prep companies ample time to prepare students for the exam structure but there are still several uncertainties making it difficult for them to develop practice materials and course work. Where is the best place that has the most information about the MCAT 2015? Go directly to the AAMC MCAT 2015 which contains various preview guides, sample practice questions, and a sense of the exam structure. Is it futile to take an old practice test? The structure of the questions will be constant (multiple choice, four answer options per question, penalty for wrong answers, testing for critical thinking over content). AAMC is cutting off all access to the old contents by end of January. Take the current practice test with a grain of salt because a decent amount of content from the physical sciences are removed. The old exam can end up doing more harm than good if they give you unrealistic expectations. When should I take the MCAT? Take it when you're ready, which usually means later in your undergrad career and once you've got a strong background in the pre-requisite content. The exam can be taken as early as at the end of your sophomore year. Alec predicts that overall raw scores are going to drop for 2014 since a lot of people are going to be rushing to take the exam before they're actually ready, hence, weaker performance. Generally, you're ready to take the exam once you've taken your pre-requisites and have put in a solid 2-3 months of studying at a minimum. Note: On average, MCAT is typically taken in your 2nd semester as a junior. Students apply to medical school at the end of junior year/beginning of senior year Pushing the exam back as long as possible: Taking it too late will delay your application. Make sure to have your score, if possible, by the time you submit your application or very soon after that. MCAT takes a month to get your score back so the latest you can take it is March or April. Get far from the habit of delaying the MCAT because it's just one portion of the application. The more time spent studying for the MCAT, the less time you have for shadowing, volunteering, and exploring the premed space. If you've submitted your application and checked on there that you're scheduled to take the MCAT later, the medical school will sit on your application until all information is there. Later summer/early fall test dates are geared towards people who are planning to applying next year and just want to have an extra year to not have to worry about the MCAT and do all things involved for preparing for the application process. “The rolling admissions is a game of musical chairs. The longer the game goes, the less chairs there are, and the music keeps playing.” Some pieces of advice for premed students: Have a conversation with test prep companies to see what available options you have to help you along. A course isn't for everyone but at least give it some serious consideration to see if it's going to be right for you or not. What M Prep offers: Practice content Database of practice passages MCAT Question of the Day (with over 2,000 practice questions for free) Online course Links and Other Resources: www.MCATquestion.com MCAT Question of the Day Service M Prep MCAT Prep eCourses AAMC MCAT 2015 Info Check out Ryan's review on M Prep www.medicalschoolhq.net/mprep Session 62: Allison's Story - When the Doctor Becomes the Patient If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
February 12, 2014
64: Brain Science Podcast Host Doc Campbell Shares Her Journey
Session 64 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Ginger Campbell, host of the Brain Science Podcast. Presently, Ginger is also an ER doctor in Alabama. Aside from talking about her awesome podcast, Ginger also shares her experiences relating to her path into medicine, some challenges, and her golden nuggets of wisdom for new and upcoming doctors. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ginger: The early beginnings in Ginger's path to medicine: Analog computing as one of her favorite classes Engineering as a great background for going into medicine Meeting her husband and moving to Birmingham Getting exposed to a physiology class that made her want to do research Taking her master's in biomedical engineering Going to the University of Alabama - School of Medicine Got an early decision Medical school application back then: GPA Not as competitive in terms of scores Old students and women in medical school: BAKKE Case - lawsuit related to age discrimination which was settled in favor of a middle-aged guy who wanted to go to medical school. Medical schools were then opening slots to older people. Title XI as another great factor for more women in medical school; 1/3 of Ginger’s class was composed of women The hardest part of medical school: Memorization - Ginger almost flunked in anatomy One bad advice her premed advisor gave her: Not to take classes that were like what they would have in medical school Ginger’s road to medicine: Taking her internship Leaving medicine after internship and and getting her license and taught biomedical engineering for 3 1/2 years to make way for her love of softball Getting burnt out in medical school Loving patient care but hating the medical center atmosphere Going back to residency in family medicine Doing a pediatric rotation with a family practitioner Ending up in the ER as originally planned On the Brain Science Podcast: Running for 7 years now Been on the top of the medicine page of iTunes since 2007 Its goal is for people to get accurate information about neural science Diverse audience with 10-20% of listeners are physicians or PhD's The importance of not talking down to patients: Translate our jargon into normal English terms Get a feel of her show and listen to Episode 102 of the Brain Science Podcast for free. Ginger suggests listening to Episode 32 ($1.00) and Episode 8 ($1.00). They do cost a dollar to listen to now (anything older than 25 episode ago), but they are definitely worth it. She also recommends many of her episodes from her Books and Ideas Podcast. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Don't do it for the money. Make sure you know what you're getting yourself into. Spend time with doctors and know what's really like and shadow physicians. Once you know this is what you really want to do then do whatever it takes. If you're attracted to medicine but unsure if you want to be a physician, check out the other areas like physical therapy. Links and Other Resources: The Premed Years Podcast Session 063: PA to DO – What Route Should YOU Take and Questions to Ask Brain Science Podcast episode mentions: Episode 102: Dangers of Diagnostic Inflation with Dr. Allen Frances Episode 8: How Neurons Communicate Episode 32: A Brief Introduction to Brain Anatomy Books and Ideas Podcast Interviews with: Paul Offit from the Children's Hospital in Philadelphia on Vaccine Safety Robert Martensen Follow Ginger on Twitter @docartemis If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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46 min
February 5, 2014
63: PA to DO – What Route Should YOU Take and Questions to Ask
Session 63 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Mark Kauffman, the Assistant Dean of Graduate Studies at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM), who was previously a PA. If you're a student struggling with the decision of whether you should be a doctor, go to medical school and give up 4 years of your life, 3 years of residency, plus the debt that comes with it versus taking a PA program and then going straight out in the workforce with less debt, then this episode is surely worth listening to. Learn from Mark as he made his leap from being a PA to going to medical school and now working at LECOM where they offer an impressive 3-year medical school program LECOM for current PA's who want to go back to medical school. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Mark: Mark's initial path to medicine: Wanted to become a doctor since he was a kid Having doubts and fears about going to medical school His dad finding the PA profession for him His thought that he can always do more later even if he does the PA route Mark's PA journey and his switch to medical school route: Working as a PA in pediatric transplant surgery at the Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh Having the desire to fully accept the challenges and disappointments and to be recognized for the services he was providing Contacting the schools and scheduling his interviews Getting his acceptance in Lake Erie College so he canceled his other interviews The PA practice versus physician practice: Lack of pathophysiology in PA Full autonomy as a physician When to consider being a PA: If you don't want to have the expense of medical school If you want less commitment at the end of the day If you want more flexible responsibilities Specialty limitations of a PA: You can do anything under the scope of your practicing physician Your residency is like a work in training 3 common reasons for PA's to go back to medical school: Increase depth of knowledge Autonomy Ability to do more for their patients 2 things that stop PA's from going back to medical school: Expense Time away from clinical practice Lake Erie's special program for PA's: Mark took a Master's in Medical Education course Part of his curriculum was a thesis in developing curriculum Brought his knowledge in both PA curriculum and medical school curriculum together Mark's proposal of a 3-year accelerated pathway where PA gets to keep their DO degrees in 3 years instead of 4 In PA curriculum, only 50% of colleges require organic chemistry while 7% of colleges require physics Developing the curriculum in a 3-year format: Shortening their clinical rotations No need for electives and selectives No vacation Accelerating their clinical years to allow them to do it in a 3-year format A brief overview of their 3-year program: 12 seats per year (6 seats reserved for primary care applicants while the other 6 seats are undeclared which means you can do any osteopathic residency) Some pieces of advice for premed students: The PA career is a career as a mid-level practitioner. Do not use a PA program just as a stepping stone. But if you want get the medical knowledge before you come in as a premed program, go for it. Have a knowledge of patient care in clinical setting. Get exposed to shadowing and find a place where you can become a scribe. Links and Other Resources: If you are currently a PA, check out LECOMs Accelerated Physician Assistant Pathway. Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine LECOM Accelerated Physician Assistant Pathway (APAP) If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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35 min
January 29, 2014
62: Allison's Story - When the Doctor Becomes the Patient
Session 62 In this episode, Ryan and Allison talk about what it's like when the doctor becomes the patient. Specifically, Allison shares her personal story of being diagnosed with Crohn's disease,  its impact on her practice and her family, and the most important lessons learned. This is something we need to understand being the ones who usually are well and who treat patients and that is to try to relate to somebody when you've never had that experience before. Becoming a patient when you're the one used to treating other people’s illnesses certainly gives you a totally new perspective toward patient care. Today, Allison gives you a huge glimpse of what it's like to be a patient as we try to bridge the separation between the "well" and the "sick." You need to understand and reflect on the patients who come to you for help and trying to put yourself in their shoes that we all must strive for if you want to become a better physician. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Allison discusses her health condition: Allison started losing weight Running to the bathroom 5-6 times a day and being really sick Focusing too much on patient care and not focusing on herself Realizing that something was not right Calling her primary care physician Going to a gastroenterologist for a consult Going through a colonoscopy Getting diagnosed with Crohn's disease From being a physician to becoming a patient: Feeling vulnerable and in need of help Although having a background in medicine but not knowing what specific treatments she needed Not knowing what the future held A humbling experience and having a new perspective Allison's silver linings: Having a background in medicine Having a basic understanding about the disease, outlook, and general treatments Biggest lessons: Try to think what it's like to be a patient that doesn't have the resources Going to forums and being able to talk to other people going through the same thing Take the time as a physician about how the patient is feeling, their fears and anxieties. This is part of the treatment. Respond to your patients as immediately as possible. Make friends with the nurses. They're very nice people who take care of their patients. Meeting a community of other patients with Crohn's disease who are trying to raise money and awareness. The different stressors that patients deal with: Stresses of life that might have led to their diagnosis Stresses of their diagnosis Stresses of insurance companies. Seeing medical bills as a whole new level of stress(more like a $10,000 bill that got Allison pulling her hair off) Stresses of not hearing from your doctor right away Paternalism versus patient-doctor collaboration: Paternalism in medicine means that as a patient, you do what the doctor says. No questions asked, just do it. Patient-doctor collaboration: There is conversation about what works best for the patient. There is patient autonomy where they get to make informed decisions Inform the patient about all of their options. Discuss the pros and cons of each option. You still add in your expertise and your thoughts where you're guiding them. How you perceive them as difficult patients may just be patients who are advocating for themselves. Understand that as a patient pushes a little bit, they're not being defiant but simply advocating for themselves.We learn so much from patients. Respond to patients in an open-minded manner. Respect the patient's decision and support them the best way that you can and in the safest manner possible with all the options laid out. Don’t make a crack or joke about a patient or what they're dealing with because you never know what they're dealing with. Never make blanket statements. Bridging the gap between the well and the sick: We're all human beings.We all suffer from diseases. We need to be taking care of each other in a mindful manner Team Challenge An organization that is part of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America where various groups across the country get together and run a marathon in order  to raise money for research and awareness of the Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and inflammatory bowel disease in general. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Understand that patients are vulnerable. They have to deal with a lot of stresses.At the end of the day, it's human-to-human interaction. Understand their stories and stresses to be able to fully treat them. Links and Other Resources: Session 047: Avoiding Burnout as a Premed, Med Student, and Beyond Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Team Challenge Leah4Sci.com - Organic Chemistry Resources & Tutoring If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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49 min
January 22, 2014
61: Medical School Mom - Prioritizing Family, School and More
Session 61 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Rebekah Costello, a current 4th year medical student at Midwestern University Chicago - College of Osteopathic Medicine. She also runs a blog at doctorandmom.blogspot.com. Today, she shares with us her medical school experience as nontraditional student who went through seven different higher education institutions before finally landing at the current school she's at. Having started medical school at 35 years old and a mom of three children, find out how Rebekah practically juggled her life and glean lessons from her, particularly on how to set your priorities and put aside those that are not really important to you. Her passions for both her family and becoming a physician that exude from this interview will truly inspire you. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Rebekah: Rebekah's path to her medical school journey: Being pregnant with her son and going back to her undergrad studies Pursuing her biology degree to be eligible to do genetic counselling Shadowing a genetic counsellor and realizing the actual job was different from what she thought it to be Wanting to be there more than just a 15-minute interaction with patients The importance of shadowing: To know what it's like being a physician It's okay to step away if it's not what you thought it was or wanted Her experiences of balancing being a nontraditional student and a mother: Starting a family at a very early age Going through the Master's program Knowing that it's really what you want 100% Getting support from her husband Preparing meals for her family Teamwork as the key! Her 1st year of medical school as a very challenging phase - letting go of micromanagement Having a good support network Being okay with not being the number one in class as long as she's able to be there for her family Prioritizing her time as a nontrad premed: Literally making use of every spare second of his day Asking her professors about certain points about the lecture for clarification Perusing her note packets to have an idea of their lecture flow Making audio flashcards Making sure she is able to spend dinner with her family to maintain that sense of family Having lunch with her daughter on the weekends Planning the week ahead and studying after the kids went to bed at night Family time was crucial, vital, and key but limiting the activities of her kids Going through her application and the interview: Getting put on the waitlist and her Master's being not a guaranteed acceptance Integrating the fact that she has a family into the interview Some pieces of advice for premed students: Don't let anybody tell you it can't be done. Let go of little things and micromanagement. Even if you don't do it, it will be okay. Family always comes first. You will hear people giving a ton of advice. Don't listen to them because you and only you know what study skills and organizational skills work for you. Be flexible and be willing to change because life happens. Don't lose sight of who you are. Do not let the process change you. Keep who you are. Links and Other Resources: Check out Rebekah's blog at doctorandmom.blogspot.com www.mothersinmedicine.com If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
January 15, 2014
60: Combined Degree Programs with Ajay & Aleena in-Training.org
Session 60 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Ajay Major and Aleena Paul, both 2nd year medical students at Albany Medical College. They went to Union College for undergrad where the got accepted to the school's Leadership in Medicine Program, which is a combined BS/MBA/MD program - Yes, 3 degrees in 8 years! Today, Ajay and Aleena talk about the combined program which you might be interested in. They also talk about an awesome venture they started, carrying their love of writing and journalism back when they were undergrads into what is now called in-training.org, the "agora" of the medical student community. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ajay and Aleena: "I want to help people" Don't put "I want to help people" in your personal statement. Explain in your own words how you're going to help people. What is it about medicine that you're going to help people? Choosing their undergrad for their premed curriculum: Ajay: Having the strong foundation in both sciences and humanities (Ajay wanting to study Spanish because he wants to serve the Latino community) Finding Union College's program MBA in Healthcare Administration Being able to understand the finance of the health system and how it's structured Ajay did a program abroad where he visited other countries to get a better appreciation for how culture and society can affect health systems Aleena: Having a dual interest in the arts and the humanities and noticing most premed programs have less emphasis on the humanities Stumbling upon the combined degree programs Union College's environment drew her in after visiting the college and having spoken with students who were in the program (Aleena spent the evening at the college and asked students a lot of questions to better solidify what she was looking for) Wanting to learn about the healthcare system as a whole Talking with her peers and guidance counselors The importance of visiting the medical school you want to go to: Asking questions to see if the program is your fit To see if it's the kind of environment that you want both academically and extracurricular-wise You have to make sure both schools (undergrad/medical school) are a fit for you. Going through undergrad years knowing they already had an acceptance into medical school: The premed edge - allows you to throw your energy into other things you want to work on (journalism on Ajay's part) There are restrictions but it allows you a wiggle room. Shadowing, research, clinical hours, and volunteering are still involved in the program but they're not doing it for the sake of application but because they want to prepare for medical school You get to explore your passions! Getting guidance as combined degree program students versus traditional premed students: Having a list of required courses - less flexibility in terms of classes The Health Professions Office for the Leadership in Medicine program and the traditional premeds office are the same Their biggest struggles as premeds: Organic chemistry Thoughts about whether the combined degree was the right track (For high schoolers, you may shadow a physician now to get the exposure and make your decision a bit easier) The origins of in-Training.org and moving forward: Experience from college doing the school newspaper Wanting to continue the ability to communicate and putting thoughts out there as medical students Wanting to provide to medical school peers in-training started back when they were undergrad before the medical school stage Attending the Student National Medical Association in Atlanta and speaking with a physician who has done some physician journalism work The idea of "going big" Going through the foundational principles of the publication Going live in July 2012 and now is a publication entirely run by medical students with 16 medical students from the U.S. and Canada in their editorial board What in-training.org provides: Receiving an influx of reflections from medical students at all stages of their education talking about their experiences) Articles on policy, bioethics, laws, comments on medical education on a national and international scale Fostering a sense of community for collaboration Getting a real sense of the challenges and joys of being a medical student Want to write for in-training.org? Send an email to editorinchief@in-training.org and they will work with you to figure out something that you can write about or something you're very passionate to write about. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Identify what you're passionate about. There is so much more to being a doctor. Allow your passion to develop. Take time to relax. Find a group of friends that you can relax with. Do things outside of your premedical courses to keep your personal sanity and your health. Links and Other Resources: www.turntablehealth.com www.zdoggmd.com Session 29: Interview with ZDoggMD, Yes - He is a Real Doctor Go say hi to Ajay and Aleena on Twitter and say thanks for taking their time to talk to us! Twitter handle: @InTrainingDoc If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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43 min
January 8, 2014
59: MCAT Retakes - Change and Improve to Get the Score You Want
Session 59 In this episode, Ryan talks with Bryan Schnedeker, the Academic Director at Next Step Test Prep and the National Director for their MCAT Programs. Today, we talk about MCAT retakes, what that exactly means to retake the MCAT, things to consider, assessing what went wrong with the first MCAT you took. MCAT should only be taken once. The test is such a beast that it has to be taken once, ideally. However, there could be times when you may need to take it again (hopefully not in your case) so this episode seeks to hell provide with you with the much-needed information on retaking MCAT so you get the score that you want. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Bryan: Retaking the MCAT Anxiety is the biggest thing you have to deal with when it comes to retaking the test. You're not alone - up to 15% of folks who retake the test the 2nd time (that means around 6,000 out of 50,000-70,000 MCAT takers) Should you retake the MCAT? Get a little bit of distance from your past score Don't make a decision right away Talk to your parents, friends, premed advisors Approach it in the most rational way possible The most common mistake when preparing to take the MCAT: Not taking enough real AAMC MCAT practice tests Simulating the AAMC practice test: Go to the www.e-MCAT.com, the official website for AAMC practice tests Click on the radio button saying "Simulate the Real Exam" 3 sections will be delivered in order 10-minute break between sessions Take each section in order under timed conditions Don't use a calculator for the physical sciences and chemistry section Try to mimic the real experience as much as possible “Practice doesn't make perfect. Practice makes permanent.” Taking a course correction: Lessons Learned Taking a practice test itself will give you a sense of where you are right now but it doesn't raise your score. You don't cure the disease. The actual treatment is learning from the test. Take anywhere from 3-4 days to as much as 2 weeks in between practice tests to analyze the test question by question and extract from the test the "lessons learned" Keep track of Lessons Learned journal Factors to consider when deciding whether to retake the MCAT: Look at the reality and the risks. High risk: Getting roughly the same score or a lower score Rule of thumb: Your next MCAT must be 3 or more points higher. AAMC published data that students who start: Below a 26 - A little more than half of them will get the same or lower score. 27-32 - 2/3 of students will do worse or the same Determine your options. What is your score versus your goals? Going to a Caribbean school DO vs. MD school Schools where your MCAT score is more in line Why do you want to be a doctor? What is your goal? If it's simply to get into healthcare, there are several other options out there other than being an MD. MD vs. DO schools (DO schools are now harder and harder to get into versus allopathic schools) Caribbean schools and the Caribbean take lesser MCAT score MCAT score does not dictate how well you're going to do in medical school, in your boards, or how good of a doctor you're going to be in the future. When you're deciding to retake the MCAT: Call the medical schools. Get information straight from the horse's mouth. Ask to speak with someone from the admissions office and get a recommendation from them. Go to the premed/prehealth advisor or committee of your undergrad school Warning: Not all schools will want to talk to you or give you advice but many of them will. Factors to consider when retaking the MCAT: Time and resources Retaking the MCAT means going back from scratch and earning your points again. It can even be more work. Overcoming the bad habits You may have developed some bad habits while preparing for the MCAT the first time so you have to keep your eyes open and understand that it's a big, daunting task to re-prepare for the MCAT. Two biggest factors for success in the MCAT: Attitude Study groups Gather a group of 3 to get the social support you need to really stick to it and overcome the challenge. The benefits of having a study group: Applying the adage of "See one. Do one. Teach one." Lets you teach each other. Teaching helps you learn. Working with someone with a different skill set than you since actively teaching will solidify your knowledge better than anything else can. Your dream team for a study group: One person strongest in physical sciences One person strongest in verbal One person strongest in biological sciences *Don't be limited by geography. Utilize the power of technology (Facebook, Skype, etc.) Tips to get the score you want: Doing the same thing is going to get you the same results. Figure out what you did and what you need to do differently. Don't make the mistake of not taking enough practice tests or not learning from them Figure out what you're doing with your practice tests. Are you using them correctly? The Practice Effect: Reassess with the same assessment and performance goes up even though the underlined skill hasn't changed May fade after 4 months or so Other MCAT prep resources: Practice tests from test prep companies Books Should you buy more books? Use the books you have correctly and it will get you where you need to go. Know your MCAT book perfectly from front to back How to study your MCAT book: Take a multi-pass approach Skim through the book. Read again and study the diagrams. Read again slowly and take notes. Read again and answer the questions. Put it away for two days for information to be encoded in your long term memory. Read well the questions again. Repeat the process for mastery. What kind of outside help do you need? Take a look at your available resources and take advantage of them. If you took a course and the teacher wasn't so good, shop around and sit in on a number of classes until you find a teacher you like. About Next Step Test Prep: Provides boutique tutoring style "For you" mentality as the driving force of their existence One-on-one tutoring as the best learning environment 40% of their business consists of MCAT re-takers Re-takers need one-on-one guidance Majority of takers and re-takers who come to them have taken MCAT lecture classes from other companies What to consider when making your initial prep decision: Go e-MCAT.com Take AAMC Test 3 under real simulation conditions AAMC will give you an outline  of all the science topics that will be on the test Read through the outlines to see your comfort level with the material Make an assessment based on where you are now versus where you want to go “Taking a diagnostic test after you've signed up for a course is already too late.” Some pieces of advice for premed students: Stay positive. Your attitude shapes your reality.  Do a positive review of your MCAT material. At least once a week, only review the questions you got right. Change your focus to change your reality and the MCAT goes from a negative to a positive experience. 'Whether you think you can or you think you can't, you're right." - Henry Ford Links and Other Resources: e-MCAT.com Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Session 17: Step Up Your MCAT Prep with the Princeton Review Session 35: What to Do to Fix Your Application with Dr. Polites Check out Bryan's blog www.nextstepmcat.com Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
47 min
January 1, 2014
58: The Best of 2013 at the Medical School HQ
Session 58 In this episode, Ryan is joined by Allison. As the new year ushers in, they talk about the highlights of 2013, some things they've missed, and some exciting things to come moving forward. For the year 2013, we have delivered 52 podcasts. Our podcast episodes have been downloaded 60,000 times and the website received over 200,000 visits. Thank you for all our support! We are setting a goal of 120,000 downloads in 2014. Help us achieve that goal and let your friends, classmates, colleagues, or premed advisors know about the podcast and help us spread the word! Leave a comment or reach out to us on Twitter or Facebook or email us and let us know about any topic you want covered. 2013 Episode Highlights (Ryan & Allison’s favorites or the most downloaded episodes) Session 19 - Interview with a Medical School Interview and Admissions Expert Interview with Dr. Norma Wagner, PhD in Anatomy and the Dean of Admissions at three different medical schools What you'll learn from this episode: Key things you need to think as a premed Challenges medical schools have when narrowing the applications Going through a holistic application process Competition among medical school for top applicants Session 07 - 10 Traits You Need to Succeed in Medical School (the most downloaded podcast of all time) What you'll learn from this episode: The importance of humility, being a team player, discipline, persistence, drive as well as being brave, adaptable, and empathic Session 17 - Step Up Your MCAT Prep with The Princeton Review Interview with Chris Manuel, MCAT expert from the Princeton Review What you'll learn from this episode: The importance of test-taking skills The ability to comprehend what's being asked and analyze the questions Session 32 - The Top 7 Things You Should Know as a Medical Student What you'll learn from this episode: Learning from patients over reading textbooks when you're in the ward Taking care of yourself Understanding the importance of Boards (USMLE Step 1 or Level 1) Residency application timing Finding the study habits that work for you Session 35 - How to Fix a Medical School Application After Starting Premed Poorly What you'll learn from this episode: Knowing what resources are available such as tutorials and pre-health advising Using the resources right and getting help when you need it Dr. Polites was our featured guest on two Sessions this year, #23 and #35.  He is an awesome resource for premed and medical students. Other episode favorites: Session 47: Interview with Dr. Dike Drummond on Avoiding Burnout as a Premed, Med Student, and Beyond Learn about the power of the squeegee breath Session 10: Interview with Dr. Victoria Rosner, the Associate Dean and GS Coordinator of Academic Affairs at Columbia's Postbac Premed program (The 1st postbac program in the U.S.) Session 26: 6 Myths of Osteopathic Medical School Interview with two 3rd year osteopathic medical students who wrote A Brief Guide to Osteopathic Medicine where they reveal the 6 myths about osteopathic medicine and osteopathic physicians. Links and Other Resources: Episode mentions: Session 19 - Interview with a Medical School Interview and Admissions Expert Session 7 - 10 Traits You Need to Succeed in Medical School Session 17 - Step Up Your MCAT Prep with The Princeton Review Session 32 - Top 7 Things You Should Know as a Medical Student Session 35 - How to Fix a Medical School Application After Starting Premed Poorly Session 26 - 6 Myths of Osteopathic Medical School Session 47 - Avoiding Burnout as a Premed, Med Student and Beyond Session 10 - Interview with Columbia Postbac Premed Program 2008 Science Article about MCAT Test Format A Brief Guide to Osteopathic Medicine Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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40 min
December 24, 2013
57: Top Resources & Tools for Premeds and Medical Students
Session 57 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about a number of relevant resources for premeds, medical students, and residents whether you're looking for books to help you prepare for your medical school applications or you simply want to take a breather and read some fun, yet insightful books. (Plus, some movie recommendations and what stethoscope to use!) By the way, we previously rolled out a post covering some of the top books we highly recommend premeds should read while not studying. Resources for Premeds: Important resources when trying to figure out which medical schools to apply to: AAMC's MSAR AACOM's CIB Fun books to read: Atul Gawande's Books - His books cover more on problems relating to healthcare as well as practice of medicine and surgery today, and some resolutions to address those issues Better Complications A Checklist Manifesto   atul gawande The Intern Blues: The Timeless Classic About the Making of a Doctor A look into what life is like as a intern which will give you a good view of the different challenges faced White Coat: Becoming A Doctor At Harvard Medical School About a physician's medical school experience at Harvard The House of God A classic and a great read for any premed or medical student about a doctor's internship journey (Most modern hospital dramas are loosely based on this book) The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong About a little girl from Laos with severe epilepsy living in California and the book takes you through their struggles and highlights the importance of cultural understanding and appreciation of diversity Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures The Heartbeat of Success by Alexa Mieses Everything I Learned in Medical School by Dr. Sujay Kansagra MCAT Books The Princeton Review MCAT Material Barron's MCAT Material Examkrackers MCAT Material Kaplan MCAT Material Practice Tests AAMC Practice Tests (3, 4, & 5 are too easy. 9 & 11 are the most realistic) The best thing about practice tests is the REVIEW afterwards! Movie Recommendations: Doctors' Diaries Patch Adams Gross Anatomy Resources for 1st/2nd Year Medical Students: Important things to have: Getting your white coat Lots of pens, highlighters, notebooks Mobile devices like tablet and computer More things to consider: Have a good study buddy Have a good study environment Bring a change of clothes for the Anatomy Lab Books: Get Frank Netter's books for classic anatomy stuff Robbin's Pathology book Review Guides: Board Review Series Books High Yield Books Rapid Review Books For allopathic students: First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 (get this early) Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History-Taking Resources for 3rd/4th Year Medical Students: Books: Maxwell Quick Medical Reference Teaches you how to write SOAP note, transfer note, admissions note, and more cheat sheets Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopoeia 2014 Deluxe Lab-Coat Edition (Pharmacy bible for medical students and attending physicians) Other Pocket Books: Pocket Medicine: The Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of Internal Medicine (Pocket Notebook) The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics, Print + Online The Sanford Guide to Antimicrobial Therapy For Surgical Rotation: Surgical Recall book with bullet points iPhone Apps Epocrates (electronic version of the Pharmacopoeia) MedCalc (great calculator for different medical formulas) Dynamed (clinical summaries on different medical topics) VisualDX (diagnosis and treatment plan) Boards & Wards for USMLE Steps 2 & 3 (Boards and Wards Series) Stethoscope: 3M Littmann Cardiology III Stethoscope (Multiple Sizes/Colors) Ophthalmoscope & Otoscope: (you don't really need to buy one though) Welch Allyn Diagnostic Kit- Panoptic Plus Kit Includes PanOptic Opthalmoscopes, MacroView Otoscope, Convertible Rechargeable Handle, & Nose/Throat Illuminator In Soft Case Other Stuff You Need to Have: Penlight EKG Caliper Trömner Reflex Hammer Tuning Forks Trauma Shears Websites: UpToDate Peer-reviewed data on diagnosis, treatment plans, etc. (you only have access to is at the hospital because they're paid for) Shelf Prep Books: Step-Up to Medicine (Step-Up Series) Case Files Books Blueprints Recall Series MKSAP 16: Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program (ACP, MKSAP Print Version Parts A&B Pkg) Bibles for Medicine: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine: Volumes 1 and 2, 18th Edition Andreoli and Carpenter's Cecil Essentials of Medicine: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access, 8e (Cecil Medicine) Resources for Residents: AAMC's Roadmap to Residency Board Review Books Sleep Food Family Time Coffee Other Links and Resources: Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
45 min
December 18, 2013
56: Taking Care of Patients in Today's Electronic World
Session 56 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Regina Harrell, an Internal Medicine physician and an assistant professor in the College of Community Health Services at the University of Alabama. She plays a significant role in the geriatric rotation for family medicine residents at the Capstone Village, an awesome place to learn about geriatric care. Regina recently published an article in the Pulse Magazine, which was also featured on NPR's Shots Health News website. Her article called “Why A Patient's Story Matters More Than A Computer Checklist” was an avenue for her to voice out her frustration with electronic health records (EHRs). Today, you will learn more about the in-depth look at what practicing medicine is like in the modern age of electronic medical records systems, the frustrations we have as physicians, and some of the pros and cons. At the end of the day, patient care is clearly what matters. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Regina: Regina's journey to becoming a physician: Growing up with his father as a nursing home administrator so she always had a hundred extra grandmothers Signing up for the nursing assistant class at the nursing home and getting exposed to patient care Wanting to be an oncologist and shadowing one but realizing it wasn't for her Shadowing a geriatrician and loving the practice Starting full time with geriatrics and currently being a part-time geriatrician Her premed struggles: Always picking the hardest of everything and applying to medical school at a very challenging, highly competitive year Applying to 12-15 schools and getting into one of them (a humbling experience after being offered scholarships to more than one place as an undergrad) Do doctors still do house calls? Yes, apparently. House calls actually allow a more personal patient care interaction The biggest struggles of medical student on rotation: Balancing all the demands put on them Work hour restrictions while absorbing as much information as they can Technology can make it more difficult for them to wade through different electronic medical record systems About Regina's article “Why A Patient's Story Matters More Than A Computer Checklist:" No perfect way to keep a record Paper charts also have their own flaws Federal government's mandate for EMR's to become part of patient records otherwise physicians will be paid less The challenge of documenting when you're far away without any phone or internet connection EMRs' role in healthcare: They exist because the government mandated it for you to get paid No programs have been written to make doctor-patient relationships better Now they've become a barrier to patient care instead of helping patient care Will the EMR system get better: Regina hopes physicians will revolt against using a system that is not helpful to patients The importance of having a business experience as a doctor: Learn more about business administration and marketing or take business classes to help you think outside the box more. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Some parts of the EMR system really work very well such as being able to look up a patient's lab and x-ray results online. Whatever your career is, find the inside that is the "calling" part like holding a patient's hand and knowing you're the doctor at their house whenever they need you as with Regina's case. Relationship building is the best part of medicine. Links and Other Resources: NPR Article - Why A Patient's Story Matters More Than A Computer Checklist Regina Harrell, MD Bio The Crimson White Article Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
30 min
December 11, 2013
55: 5 Tips to Help You Choose a Medical Specialty
Session 55 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about how to pick a medical specialty and they came up with 5 key things that are instrumental to forming your path and choosing your specialty at whichever point of your journey you may be right now. Whether you're a premed or a medical student, it's never too early to start thinking about what kind of doctor you want to be. When is the best time to think about what specialty you want to take? It's never too early to be thinking about what specialty you want to take. The very latest that you want to arrive to that decision is 4th year of medical school since you need to apply for residency where applications open around September. Data show that many people apply to multiple specialties. Although it's never too late too, should you decide to switch to another specialty later on. If you have an interest early on explore that early. Always keep an open mind. Go into every rotation with an open mind. Go through your pre-clinical years with an open mind either. There is that possibility of switching to a different specialty because things can completely change once you get immersed into the real thing and you get actual time exposure to that certain field. The point of 3rd year rotation is to teach you about the different fields. Try to get as much experience in the field as you can to cement in your mind if it's the specialty for you. Experience is the best way to figure out the right fit for you. What you see during hospital rotations is not entirely reflective of what is actually going to look like in the future. You don't necessarily have to practice in a hospital since you can opt to work in a community setting. Get exposure as early as you can. Start figuring out what you might be interested in. Some specialties are research-heavy. The earlier you get exposure to a field, the more opportunities you're going to get. Generally, there are 5 core clinical rotations as a 3rd year: Internal Medicine General Surgery Pediatrics OB/Gyn Psychiatry Don't wait till 3rd year, get exposed as early as you can to figure out what you want to be doing Use the process of elimination. Sit with a checklist and go through all the specialties. Cross things off as progress through medical school. Some questions to ask yourself: Do you want to be a surgeon or a diagnostician? Do you want to spend most of your time doing procedures or solving puzzles? (Consider your level of dexterity and spatial sense. Understand where your skills may lie. It's not about a matter of being able to do it, rather, you have to be a master at your craft.) Do you want to take care of adults or children? (Dealing with the child's parents can be very challenging) Med-Peds is a select residency where you will be trained to be able to practice and take care of both adults and children. Family medicine also allows you to take care of the whole family unit. Do you like generally well people or those who are critically ill? (Critical care medicine involves majority of your time taking care of critically ill people.) Are you an adrenaline junkie? (If you can handle jumping from room to room with patient crashing after patient crashing, consider being an ER physician) How much patient contact do you want? (If you don't want any patient interaction, consider pathology or radiology) Another thing to consider: Patients you're going to be taking care of and the emotional toll it's going to have on you especially when dealing with cancer patients. Find a mentor. Having a mentor is one of the keys to success to medical school. Mentors help pave the way for you. It's life-changing. Benefits of having a mentor: Broadening your experience Exposing you to different facets of the field Providing opportunities for you to meet other people in that field Qualities in a mentor to look for: Someone you look up to and you connect with Someone who's passionate about the field Someone who has the time to devote to helping you Research. Specialties like Neurosurgery, ENT, and Rad-Onc expect you to have research experience in that certain specialty so find a research mentor and get involved in a project early on. About The Academy We talked about the Academy, and how we are REOPENING in the next week or so. We even played an amazing testimonial from one of our members. Go to http://www.jointheacademy.net to sign up to get on the list! Links and Other Resources: Surgical Skill and Complication Rates after Bariatric Surgery 12 Medical Specialty Stereotypes The Ultimate Guide to Choosing a Medical Specialty, Third Edition Medical Specialty Algorithm Medical Specialty Aptitude Test Session 052: Getting a Mentor to Guide Your Premed Path Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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51 min
December 4, 2013
54: Dr. K, Author and Twitter Star Shares His Journey and Advice
Session 54 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Sujay Kansagra, an attending pediatric neurologist at Duke Medical Center. He is the author of the top reviewed Everything I Learned in Medical School: Besides All the Book Stuff, a memoir about his medical school experiences at Duke as well as the author of Why Medicine?: And 500 Other Questions for the Medical School and Residency Interviews. His third book is in the works which will be a comprehensive medical school advice manual for anyone in high school, college, or even in medical school. Sujay has mastered the use of Twitter under his Twitter handle @medschooladvice. Today, they talk about his medical school experience, the power of collaboration, the importance of journaling, and his insights into the hierarchy in medicine. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Sujay: The keys to success in medical school and life in general: Moving one step at a time Persistence Motivation Sujay's undergrad experience: Getting interested in the Biology and Psychology track to major in Choose a premed you're going to enjoy and do well Resources he tapped into during his premed years: Premed advising set up his academic pathway to place the core in place Relying on peers and his sister's experience being two years ahead of her Premed advisors being distant from the process and even through the process but they're knowledgeable in terms of the specifics of their school's core classes The benefits of peer advising: Knowing who you are and your personality Knowing where you might be a good fit Being your avenue to explore medicine such as the extracurricalars you're going to do Major challenges Sujay faced: The first semester as a shocker Starting off with a not so strong GPA Choosing which medical schools to apply to: Getting the feel of the institution and the students in the medical school you're visiting to Choosing a place that you can thrive and not just survive Getting the feel that it's "right" Going through the medical school interview process: Being a rigorous process The interview is the time that you need to shine Going through the academic-type and and ethical-type of interview They're getting a better sense of who you are Sujay's experience at Duke Medical School: Based on honors/pass/fail system - he found it less stressful than the undergrad setup More intense workload More hours The biggest thing that surprised him during his early years in medical school: Everybody was smart! (You may not stand out too much) The importance of having a "teamwork" attitude over a competitive attitude: You have to work as a team Don't focus on the other racers, focus on yourself. The surprising things about his clinical years: Time demands and being in a completely new language Consuming clinical work especially in surgery rotation Essentially breathing and living medicine How everyone knows everything can be intimidating (Don't worry, you'll soon learn them too!) Being okay with not knowing anything: Being comfortable with saying you don't know while also being able to answer some of the questions Your attending physicians don't expect you to know everything but just trying to figure out some holes in your knowledge so they can teach you. About Sujay's book, Everything I Learned in Medical School: Besides All the Book Stuff: Initially writing it as his journal Realizing that people could learn from his interesting stories about medicine and life in general Initially intended for the general audience but now has a big following among premeds The power of journaling: Journal everything you're seeing because this can help you when it comes to writing your personal statements and your extracurriculars in your applications The hierarchy in medicine and Sujay's insights: Hierarchy keeps things n order but it should not be use to abuse those who are in the low level of the hierarchy. Keep things as even as possible. Make sure everybody's voice is heard and that everybody is a part of the team. Remember how it felt to be a medical student. Be respectful and mindful of those below your level as well as the ancillary staff (nurses, etc.) Some pieces of advice for premed students: Enjoy every step of the road to becoming a physician. Make sure to take time to enjoy life because it's never going to get easier. There is no end to this road. As a physician, you're a lifelong learner. It's okay if medicine is not for you. Don't consider it as a failure but simply a change of course. That is completely okay. Links and Other Resources: Dr. Sujay Kansagra's Books: Everything I Learned in Medical School: Besides All the Book Stuff Why Medicine?: And 500 Other Questions for the Medical School and Residency Interviews Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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35 min
November 26, 2013
53: Zig or Zag - There Are Multiple Premed Paths to Med School
Session 53 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dalya Munves, a 2nd year medical student at the University of Texas in Houston and also blogs at The Health Scout Blog. This episode seeks to show you that you don't have to be the perfect premed student to get into medical school. Dalya talks about her premed journey, going in and out of it, until ultimately pursuing her path into medical school. Applying to medical school is not about checking off the boxes. You can still be who you are and do what you want to do and still be able to get into medical school. There are different paths you can take as a premed so do what you really are passionate about. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dalya: Dalya's earlier path to medicine: Her epiphany of becoming a doctor when she got an MRI for her back injury Decided to go to medical school after her freshman year Resources she tapped into to get information about medical school: Memoirs written by doctors like Intern Blues AMCAS Being a nontraditional student: She was 21 years old as an undergrad Planning to get dual degrees Smooth sailing for the first 2 years Putting a lot of pressure on herself to do two degrees that led to burnout and losing sight of enjoying her time in college The burnout phase: Taking an internship and not enjoying it Feeling that she had to drag herself to school everyday Getting sick and missing school She ended up dropping all her science classes and taking only 2 classes for the semester Realizing premed is not for her Going back to the premed path: Realizing she still wanted to pursue medicine Shadowing her OB/Gyn for over a month Dalya's shadowing experience: Being there before any patient came Researching what she learned and asking questions based on what she got Eventually sending her alone in the room to do certain tasks Letting her use the stethoscope to let her listen to the patient's heart and lungs Back on the path to medical school: Taking the MCAT before finishing physics MCAT as the least content-based exam: More on reasoning over your outside knowledge Using the personal statement to focus on the positive The importance of taking time off before med school: Gives you time to rest and unwind before the craziness of med school and residency Gives you a different perspective on life to help you have better patient interaction Drawing her fun cartoons: Using the website Picmonic that allows you to draw crazy pictures to help you remember Using as many different senses she can use as how Dalya learns best Here are a couple examples of Dalya's fun images: Some pieces of advice for premed students: Ask for help and talk to as many people as you can especially doctors. Listen to young doctors over premed advisors. It's okay to be scared. Just keeping doing the stuff you're supposed to do. Links and Other Resources: Dalya’s blog site: thehealthscout.blogspot.com Connect with Dalya on Twitter @HealthScoutBlog Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast  If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students.  Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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45 min
November 20, 2013
52: Getting a Mentor to Guide Your Premed Path
Session 52 Congrats to Jessica & "9th Grade High Schooler" for winning a copy of The Heartbeat of Success!" - if you didn't win,  you can purchase with the link from below In this episode, Ryan talks with Alexa Mieses, a 2 year medical student at  Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.  Today, we talk about mentorship, its impact on Alexa’s life and her path into medicine, and why she now passes this on to others as she continues to be a positive influence on others through mentoring. Alexa is also an author of the book The Heartbeat of Success: A Med Student's Guide to Med School Admissions, which offers logical and accurate advice on applying to medical school. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Alexa: Alexa's current path to medicine: A 2nd year medical student at Mt. Sinai in New York City Master of Public Health program (She will graduate with both MD and MPH in 2016) Getting a scholarship at Sinai What set Alexa up for success in getting a scholarship at Sinai: Choosing to major in Biology and minor in Psychology Exploring her love for writing on the side Becoming a member of the Minority Association of Premedical Students (MAPS), the undergrad arm of the National Medical Association, an organization specifically for medical students of color with a two-fold mission: Help medical students of color succeed at medical school Raise awareness to health disparities as well as health equity and social justice issues Growing up in Queens, New York got her exposed to health disparity issues Being awarded the Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship funded by the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, a fellowship that provides opportunities to undergrads for professional development through full-time summer internships for 3 summers, professional development seminars, and cultural activities. Her experiences as a Jeannette K. Watson fellow: Teaching biology and ecology at Bronx Zoo for the first summer Her interest in public health started revving up Spending her second summer at Gay Men's Health Crisis, an HIV community-based organization, specifically at the public policy department Writing her first magazine article about a phenomenon called corrective rape and its impact on the spread of HIV Her article being published in Pulse Magazine's Treatment Issues The impetus for Alexa to pursue medicine: Not the best student in high school and became very ill Every year in her high school, someone had died of drug-related causes Becoming involved with a drug awareness Club in high school that got her interested in psychiatry and neuroscience Her high school experience giving her the fuel and energy to do well in college Her college experience: Failing in her pre-calculus class Joining a peer tutoring program The power of course correction: When you face obstacles, before taking another step forward, stop Try to figure out what went wrong and how to get back on course The implications of being a tutor: Allowing her to reinforce a lot of the fundamental scientific concepts that helped her with her high-level courses and the MCAT Teaching as one of the best ways of learning The impact of mentorship in Alexa's life: It is transformative. Getting involved in Mentoring in Medicine, an non-profit organization dedicated to helping students interested in pursuing a career in health professions learn more about that career and become more competitive for the different programs Meeting two doctors who have helped her in school as well as with her medical school application; her mentors being able to fill that void in her professional life How to find a mentor: Your peers can be your mentor. You don't need a physician to provide you with guidance or someone who's older than you/ A mentor is someone who can be supportive and can help you find solutions to your problems. Don't be afraid to reach out to someone. There are many different ways to reach out such as email, Skype, social media. Be fearless. The worse that can happen is they will tell you no. But you'll never know what they're going to say if don't ask. If you get a no, find another one who can help you. Periodically keep in contact with your advisors, professors, colleagues. You never know what opportunities can come from that. About her book, The Heartbeat of Success: A guide to medical school admissions A 30-day challenge sponsored by Mentor in Medicine and Small Business Camp Her goal of being able to reach a larger audience and offer them invaluable tools and tips to succeed in the medical school admissions process especially to those who don't have much access to resources Writing her book in 30 days - Wow! Listening to different voices: Take every bit of advice with a grain of salt. Try to hear as many perspectives as possible and lay out every piece of advice like cards on the table. It's okay to deviate from the traditional premed path but just be prepared to explain why you made that decision. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Do what you love. People are conformed to an idea of what they think is right. If you're doing what you're most passionate about, you will naturally excel. You will naturally shine. If you're not even sure yet as to what you're passionate about, that's okay. Spend time figuring out what you love. Links and Other Resources: Follow @Soon2bDrMieses Check out The Differential Blog on Medscape where Alexa’s  writes for regularly Alexa's Book -> The Heartbeat of Success: A Med Student's Guide to Med School Admissions Alexa's Website Minority Association of Pre-medical Students Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship Mentoring in Medicine Alexa's first article on Corrective Rape: Gender Inequality and Corrective Rape of Women Who Have Sex with Women Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
40 min
November 13, 2013
51: The Journey to a Caribbean Medical School
Session 51 In this episode, Ryan talks with Jered Weinstock, a 3rd year medical student at American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine. Yup, in case you haven’t already known, Caribbean medical schools are one option if getting into an MD or DO school in the U.S. seems too bleak and hopefully after all other options have been considered. Today, Jered shares with us his path to medical school specifically the struggles he faced, having to take the MCAT four times, getting into a Caribbean medical school, and having that passion to pursue medicine at all cost. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Jered: How Jered started his path to medicine: Biochemistry major with minor in Spanish Doing research and working part-time at a pharmacy Taking two practice tests and getting a 19 on the MCAT Taking his results to his premed advisor and suggesting he retook the MCAT Going ahead applying to so many schools Got one interview in Philadelphia but got rejected The MCAT as the gatekeeper: MCAT is a very important test You need to focus on preparing for the MCAT Taking as much practice tests as needed #RespectTheMCAT Retaking the MCAT, taking a year off, and a postbac program: Graduating from college, he retook MCAT and got a 22 His premed advisor was still unhappy with the score and advised him to retake again Having a year off and working full time at a different pharmacy Had his trip of a lifetime spending 3 weeks in Europe Took the MCAT again after not receiving any interviews and got a 25 after doing more practice tests Decided not to work another year and did a post bac program in the biomedical sciences at a DO school in Philadelphia, PCOM Meeting a colleague in the postbac program and telling him about looking into the Caribbean medical schools Getting interviewed by PCOM but got rejected Applying to the Caribbean medical school Jered's application to the Caribbean medical school: Getting a call from an advisor to help him through the whole process Taking the MCAT again and got a 26 Getting acceptance with only 10 days preparation to move to the Caribbean The U.S. government will grant financial loans to some accredited Caribbean schools About the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine: Set up on a 5-semester basic science program First four semesters - basic science-oriented Each block is every 3-4 weeks After each block, you're in front of a computer sitting down, taking exams for the three classes in the same day within about 3-4 hours Fifth semester is more clinically oriented Patient exposure and shadowing experience Preparing for USMLE Step 1 and getting a 240 The attrition rate at the Caribbean medical schools: Caribbean medical schools are 'for profit' medical schools With 200 students starting out and coming across students who didn't seem to have their heart and soul into it First two semesters as the "weeding out" phase Dealing with the stigma of coming from Caribbean medical schools The challenges of Caribbean medical school students: Lack of large medical center and no affiliation with a large teaching hospital Going up against U.S. students who will be the first priority in terms of residency application Some pieces of advice for premed students: Put in as much time as you feel you need for the MCAT. It is the gatekeeper. Don't let that be the problem in terms of you getting into medical school. Live your dream! Nothing should stop you. Links and Other Resources: Follow @jeredweinstock Caribbean Medical School Interview Resources PCOM Postbac Program Session 34: #RespectTheMCAT with @PremedP Session 45: 45: 5 Reasons to Go To Medical School, and 5 to Not Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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40 min
November 6, 2013
50: 16 Golden Rules of Medicine for Premeds & Beyond
Session 50 This episode marks the 50th session of the podcast and so Ryan starts it off by reciting the modern version of the Hippocratic Oath, which is being used in many medical schools today when physicians graduate at the end of medical school. In the light of celebrating the podcast's 50th episode, Ryan and Allison talk about the 16 Golden Rules of Medicine (as suggested by Academy member Jessica). Another reason to celebrate for hitting the 100th 5-star ratings in iTunes! (In fact, it's 101). So thank you for all these great reviews! Now let's jump right into the 16 Golden Rules of Medicine: First, do no harm. Your job is to treat the patients, not harm them. Don't do something that has a high potential of hurting them. Always be professional. You will be working with other professionals so show respect that your colleagues and patients deserve. Even in difficult and taxing situations, always remember that you are a physician and you're taking care of other people. Do not lose your cool. Show respect for everyone you work with. Be respectful with everybody including from colleagues to the nurses and the janitors because every one of them plays a crucial role in the hospital. Always acknowledge your mistakes with patients. Don’t be dishonest with your team or your patients. Some states have "I'm sorry" laws wherein a patient can't sue you and use your apology as testimony in the court. But you can't hide mistakes from patients. You have to take care of yourself before you can take care of other people. There is such a high rate of burnout to people who are in the profession of putting other people first over themselves. You have to be of sound mind and health to be able to take care of another person. Don’t go searching for zebras. Always think about what is the most common and likely diagnosis. Thinking out of the box is good but don't get so off-target that you're missing the whole point. Don’t order a test just because you can bill for it. Ask yourself if results from this test will change your medical management of that patient. If not, don’t order it. Always think about the patient first. Don’t start drinking alcohol or doing drugs when you’re stressed or burned out - get help! Go talk to somebody. Seek help. Resorting to drugs or alcohol will only get you in big trouble with the risk of losing everything you've worked so hard to do for so long. Go with your gut. When someone doesn’t look good or something is not going well, speak up. Get help. Trust your instincts. Use your gut not in the sense of diagnosing the patient, but to notice that the patient just doesn't look right and use that to dig a little bit deeper. Learn to master your sixth sense. Get help from those with more experience when you need it. Don't just rely on yourself when you think you need help. Always use your resources as a physician. Don’t argue with your colleagues from other departments/services. We’re all on the same team and arguing in the chart is a big legal no-no. You might be needing help from those other services at some point. Always document EVERYTHING. If it wasn’t documented, in the legal world, it never happened. If something goes wrong, they always go back to the charts. Every conversation you have with a patient or with any family meeting, or in your daily notes, always document things that happened in medicine. Be careful about giving out medical advice to family and friends. If the person is not your patient and something goes wrong, you can be held liable. Don't feel bad to say you're uncomfortable trying to diagnose them over the phone or even in person especially if there is no opportunity to examine them. When dealing with difficult patients, always keep in mind that it’s not personal. The patient in front of you may be having the worst day of their life or have serious psychological problems. Never assume what you never know. Just do the best you can for them as a doctor. Don’t offer something to a patient that you don’t think makes sense. For example, if a patient is terminally ill and not going to benefit from any additional therapy, don’t offer the patient or the patient’s family a surgery that will not help. Be careful not to offer "pizza toppings." Always try to abide by the principle of beneficence. Beneficence means doing something that will promote the wellbeing of the patient. Even if you can’t heal the patient or cure his/her disease, you can treat the patient with kindness and offer a listening ear. "Sometimes a kind word is stronger than a chemist's drug or a surgeon's knife." Links and Other Resources: Check out Jared Easley's Starve the Doubts Podcast Session 47 - Interview with Dr. Drummond about Physician Burnout Modern Version of the Hippocratic Oath Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq. Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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38 min
October 30, 2013
49: The Scariest Things We've Encountered on our Path
Session 49 In this Halloween edition of the podcast, Ryan and Allison talk about the scariest stuff they've encountered during their path to premed, medical school, residency, and beyond - with most of them coming from first time experiences they’ve had. The path to being a physician is pretty scary with a lot of hurdles, a lot of unknown, and a lot of hard work that you don't know if it's going to pay off but at the end of the day, it all comes down to great patient care which is definitely worth all the journey. Lastly, you're not alone. You're surrounded by other people who are going through it with you so knowing that is comforting. Here is a list of the scariest stuff Ryan and Allison have encountered along their path: MCAT!!!! - Taking the MCAT as very intimidating Step 1 test First day and night on call - (What could be worse is sleeping through a page!) First family meeting - (Allison had to conduct a family meeting at only Day 3 of her internship that got her peeing in her pants, figuratively) Being in the ER waiting for trauma patients to come in (At Ryan's medical school, they had a very large level 1 trauma center and waiting for the calls is scary.) Allison being in the OR the first time Allison's first acute stroke call (Getting as much history as you can and jumping through a stroke scale to determine the extent of the stroke) Scary stuff patient-wise: Ryan and Allison getting into a locked psych ward Ryan doing his internship at a prison hospital The difficulty of communicating with a psychiatrically ill patient Allison dealing with a 48-year old patient with AML and died within 48 hours Some pieces of advice for premed students: It's okay to be scared getting exposed to these situations the first time but you will get lots of practice and practice makes perfect. Keep a journal of what you encounter as a premed because there are lots of stories you can draw from, take with you for years, and talk in your interviews or personal statements. Links and Other Resources: Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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31 min
October 23, 2013
48: Question and Answer Session on Google Hangouts
Session 48 In this episode, Ryan and Allison bring you an exciting and different format as they jump on Google Hangouts to do a live Q&A session where they answer questions that cover things like extracurriculars, best MCAT prep tips, picking up premed schools, reasons to be a physician, letters of recommendation, and dual degree BS/MD programs and whether they're worth your time. Here are the highlights of the episode: Q: Not becoming involved in an ample amount of medically related "experiential" activities, clubs as a freshman. What is the best advice for him? A: Extracurriculars are important but separate that from clinical experience.  Define one or two really thorough experiences like volunteering in a medical setting (that kills two birds with one stone). Go slow. You have plenty of time and get your feet wet with your grades. Get accustomed to being on your own and creating your own schedule. Get a little bit of the college life. Just add the extracurriculars along. Q: Can MCAT be taken in January as a trial run (sort of the actual MCAT as your practice test) and the real thing a couple of months later? A: Allison says you can take it as long as you can make it work for you. Ryan thinks psychologically, if you're studying for the test that you already know is not going to matter, then you're already not going to do as well because it's just a trial run. Ryan recommends to take the MCAT once. Take it early enough. Do it right the first time. Q: How to maximize studying for the MCAT? A: Allison says, read the content and get it down. Read one more time and start with the practice questions. Sitting in the content for too long would make it easy for you to get lost. Go back and look at what you missed. Ryan says, the MCAT has the least amount of content-based questions out of all the other tests out there. It would be a disservice to study purely content. MCAT basically tests your ability to analyze and comprehend the questions and just use part of the content you've learned in coming to the answer they want. Hence, understand how the AAMC writes the test by taking lots and lots of practice test under real simulation environment. Most importantly, go over your practice test to figure out why you got right and why you got it wrong. Q: Senior in high school and picking the right undergraduate premed school? A: Allison says, there is no perfect college for premedical education. Go to a school that challenges you and supports you in your career towards medical school. Ryan says, if you strictly go to a community college, the admissions committee might not like that. Many websites will say you can't have your pre-requisites at a community college.  So there is that risk. Ultimately, go to a school with considerations such as being near or far from family, location, weather. Go to a place where you're going to be happy and where you know you're going to be able to flourish and not just because of the name on the diploma. Q: Switching from nursing to premed? A: Listen to Session 45 - 5 Reasons to Go To Medical School, and 5 to Not. Wanting to be a physician to take up a leadership role is a good thing but not to become a "boss." Medicine is a team sport. Salary is not something you go into medicine for. That should not be the goal. At the end of the day, the central goal is you want to improve the lives of other people. Q: Developing a relationship with a surgeon in the OR in the hope of getting a letter of recommendation? A: You have a lot more time to interact with the surgeon outside the operating room just make it known that you want to see clinic patients as well. Don't be afraid to ask the surgeon about shadowing in different environments. Q: Is going through a 7-year BS/MD program worth it? A: There is no harm in applying to such program. The worse thing that can happen is they deny you and you can still go to the regular route. Links and Other Resources: Session 35: How to Fix an App After Starting Premed Poorly Session 3: Picking a Premed Undergraduate College and a Premed Major Session 23: Interview with Dr. Polites of MedPrep at Wash. U. Session 45:  5 Reasons to Go To Medical School, and 5 to Not Session 12: Shadowing Secrets for Every Premed and Beyond 2008 Science Article about the MCAT Test Format Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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53 min
October 16, 2013
47: Avoid Burnout as a Premed, Med Student and Beyond
Session 47 In this episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Dike Drummond as they talk about a common serious issue in the medical world today - physician burnout. In fact, burnout is found to happen to one in three physicians. Not only physicians experience burnout but even medical students as well. And don't blame it on the EMRs. Surveys on the prevalence of physician burnout have actually been done in the last 20 years. As physicians, we have the intention to heal other people that sometimes we tend to forget to take care of ourselves. This is something that needs to be discussed because physician burnout seems to be invisible and no one is noticing. However, physician burnout can take its toll on your practice and your life in general. Listen in to learn more about what burnout is, how it’s measured, how to avoid it, and the powerful for mindfulness. Lastly, learn about the squeegee breathing technique to help you get through the day with more awareness and less stress. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dr. Drummond: What is burnout? A cluster of symptoms measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory Scale 1 - Measurement of Exhaustion (downward spiral trajectory) Scale 2 - Deep personalization (compassion fatigue) Scale 3 - Lack of efficacy (Self-doubt about the work they do) Looking into the "disease" paradigm: Stress as the cause of burnout Burnout as the disease The popularity of physician burnout: Physician burnout prevalence surveys have been done for 20 years One in three practicing doctors is suffering from symptomatic burnout on any given office day (regardless of country, delivery systems, and specialty) "It takes happy doctors to have happy patients." Factors that contribute to physician burnout: American healthcare environment Acceleration of change in healthcare system (big data and EMR getting in between the physician and the patient) Subconscious programming physicians tend to take on during training: "Patient comes first." "Never show weakness." The "Patient comes first" mindset: A programming we receive in training The difficulty of recognizing our needs like rest, sleep, emotional, and personal self-care Creates the blind spot that underlies everything else Multifactorial aspect of it - stressed patients come to you plus you still have to take care of the EMR plus you're supposed to be available for your kids and your spouse Burnout rates in men vs. women (based on Maslach Burnout Inventory): How men experience burnout: Cynicism and sarcasm Exhaustion *They don't get to "self-doubt." So doctors get tired, cynical, and sarcastic but still believe they're doing good work. How women experience burnout: Exhaustion Cynicism and sarcasm Questioning the quality of their work They ask for help or tell somebody they're not doing well *Women comprise 85% of Dr. Drummond's clients. Medical error rates associated to burnout: Medical error rate is higher the more burned out you are Variation in the standard of care is wider in the burned out population What other rates go up: Patient satisfaction rate Turnover rates for physician and the staff members Malpractice risk Divorce Alcohol addiction Suicide Coping mechanisms that turn into survival strategies for burned out physicians: Workaholic Superhero Emotion-free Lone ranger Perfectionist How to avoid burnout: Acknowledge your self-care needs. Balance your life as you go through your training. Acknowledge your humanity and reach out to people who seem to be struggling. Be okay to ask for help. Balancing career and family life: There is no such thing as "balance in the moment" It's either you're studying 100% or you're with your family 100% You have to take care of your needs first The powerful of mindfulness: Having awareness in the moment Notice the way you breath. Notice the way stress you hold your shoulders. Learn how to release stress in the moment and be present with your breathing. How to be burnout-proof: Acknowledge the end of your humanity and the need to perform. Recognize whenever you're using those coping mechanism tools and notice how to put them away. Develop a mindfulness practice through meditation or yoga. Dr. Drummond shares the squeegee breathing technique! Some pieces of advice for premed students: You are not a doctor. You are a human being with a larger life who's chosen to practice the craft of medicine as the way to make a difference in the world. However, it's not who you are. Shut it off when it's time to and relax into the rest of you. Links and Other Resources: Follow @DikeDrummond The Happy MD The Happy MD on Facebook Burnout and Satisfaction With Work-Life Balance Among US Physicians Relative to the General US Population Burnout and Suicidal Ideation among U.S. Medical Students Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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35 min
October 8, 2013
46: How Relationships Change as a Premed & Med Student
Session 46 In this episode, Ryan and Allison talk about relationships in medical school which include personal relationships, relationships with family and friends, and newly-formed friendships. This is a very important topic to discuss because, in more ways than one, becoming physicians will affect you and relationships do change. Getting lost with friends and family can be inevitable. They simply are not going through the exact things you're going through so it's easy for frustration and tension to arise. Therefore, understanding and good communication are crucial at this point in your life in order for you to be able to focus on your path to medicine while still be able to maintain healthy relationships. On a more positive note, medical school is where you get to meet new, awesome friends or even the love of your life! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Why relationships change: Limited time to interact with the outside world Most of your time is spent on studying Medical school is very different from college Once you enter the medical school world, you speak a new language Effects of changing relationships: Frustration and tension from people who's not going through your situation You can't explain to another person who's not going through what you're going through Sharing information to your friends not in medicine: Friends not in medicine need limits - not everyone likes to hear about the gooey stuff you do because it's not something they're comfortable with Figuring out what people's comfort level is Ryan's pet peeve: Families and friends asking you if you're a doctor yet Residents are doctors Overwhelming amount of details for families to take in New relationships built in medical school: As things are changing, you also get to form new relationships in medical school You're with these people all the time so you get to know them and grow with them On personal relationships: They don't always make it through medical school. There is that disconnect. The concept that there's something in your partner's life that is taking away from their time with you leading to jealousy and frustration You may also find the love of your life in medical school. Some pieces of advice for premed students: People understand how hard you're working so be patient with your family and friends if there is a discrepancy between what they understand and what you're trying to share with them. Reserve as much time as you can to keep those relationships going. Communication is key. Let your families and friends know that you still love them and care about them but you're just in the middle of something really busy. Enjoy meeting new people in medical school. Links and Other Resources: Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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32 min
October 2, 2013
45: 5 Reasons to Go To Medical School, and 5 to Not
Session 45 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about the 5 reasons to go into medical school and 5 reasons to not. In the first part of the episode, Ryan played a short clip from the EntreLeadership Podcast talking about how you have to truly enjoy patient care to enjoy your job as a physician and truly be rewarded. Before that, an update about the Academy. As of the release of this podcast, we are closed to new members, as we are working hard with the Charter Members, but please go sign up to be notified when we reopen! Go to http://www.jointheacademy.netto learn more about it. 5 Reasons to Go to Medicine: Improve the lives and health of other human beings. You can improve the other's lives numerous other ways but as doctors, you're really focused on really improving their health and life. It becomes more than just wanting to help people. Helping the family cope at the end of a patient's life is a profound thing A sense of leadership You're leading a group of people in the care of a patient on your service The presence of autonomy since people look to you for guidance and reassurance A variety of what you can do besides patient care Clinician seeing patients in a hospital, in private practice, or in a community center Clinician educator Researcher (bench research or clinical research) Work for the government work (ex. FDA) Work at a pharmaceutical company Teacher Create an awesome podcast (like this!) Intellectual challenge Every person should be a lifelong learner. Most importantly, medicine changes all the time so physicians have to make sure they continually learn so they can continually improve their patients’ lives. Being able to perform surgery The ability to operate on another human being and having that trust from your patient. Additional reason: The ability to change one life and many other people's lives like finding a cure or discovering a new virus or a new medicine that could change lives across the world. 5 Reasons to Not Go to Medicine: Money It's the wrong reason to want to become a doctor. If you only want to make money, you can be many things - banker, lawyer, stock broker, medicine is not the place to go. Medicine is something you do day in and day out and if you don't love what you're doing, you're going to be miserable no matter how much money you make. Not to mention that medical school is so expensive, you will have to deal with huge loans. Prestige If you want to become a doctor just to have that "MD" at the end of your name, you will be dissatisfied with your work. Respect and prestige are things you earn because of the hard work you put in and not because you have some initials at the end of your name. Introducing yourself to the patient Ryan thinks introducing yourself to the patient as a doctor puts a wall between you and the patient psychologically. Allison thinks otherwise and that it helps fill in that role in letting the patient know that you're with them. What do you think? Share it with us. Medical drama disillusionment What you see on medical dramas is not what life is as a physician. Life as a physician is hell (but worth it). There are so many discrepancies in medical dramas that's just unrealistic and crazy. Pressure from parents Try to shadow a physician and see if it's something you want to do in your life and not because your parents said so You have to have the passion and desire to be called to this profession. You cannot do this for someone else. It's your life to live. Work-life balance Medicine is stressful. Medicine takes over your life. It becomes who you are. Your life may get better as an attending (depending on your field) but it does take a lot from you and your family. Additional reason: Being the smartest in your class or your county doesn't mean you want to be a doctor. Medicine is not all about intelligence. Bedside manner is just as crucial. Some pieces of advice for premed students: You have to do what you love. That is what shadowing is for so you will know what it's like to be a physician. You have to know what you're getting into to make sure that you're happy on the other side. Do some soul-searching no matter where you are in the process and go through this list to help you figure out if medicine is really for you. Links and Other Resources: Session 1 - Ryan’s Intro and Story EntreLeadership Podcast Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq. Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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47 min
September 25, 2013
44: How to Pay Back Your Medical School Loans
Session 44 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Tony Sozzo for the second time on the show as they shed light on paying back medical school loans specifically about different options for loan repayments, what it means to your bottom line and your bank account at the end of the day, the pros and cons, and some things you need to consider. You may not appreciate the topic for now but this can come handy eventually. You need to understand what it's like on the other side of medical school as you're paying back several hundred thousand dollars worth of student loans. Ultimately, Tony strongly advises that no matter what you do, allow yourself to have as many options possible at the end of the day. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Tony: The average debt medical students have: $170,000 for medical schools as a whole $185,000 - 190,000 for private schools Average residency salary: $50,000-$55,000 (depending on location) Why is it so expensive to go to medical school? Equipment Simulated patients (Harvey) Pay for good instructors/professors 2/3 of the money goes to educational instruction Choosing medical schools based on tuition: You have to go deeper than that. A $10,000-difference over the course of your lifetime isn't going to make that much of a difference. Instead, look into these considerations: Match list Safety Comfort The school's philosophy and culture For any type of repayment plan you choose, have a lot of options. Options make it work! Repayment plan options: First three are time-driven: How much debt do you have? How long are you going to repay it back? We'll figure out the monthly payment. For example, you have a debt of $170,000 and you want to pay it over a period of 10 years (120 months), you will have a very high monthly payment. Extend that to 25-30 years, you have lower the monthly payment because it's stretched out. Here’s a better picture: If you choose a 10 year repayment plan for $170,000 @ 6.8%, you'll pay: $1,956.37 - Monthly Principal & Interest $234,763.87 - Total of 120 Payments $64,763.87 - Total Interest Paid If you choose a 25 year repayment plan for the same $170,000 @ 6.8%, you'll pay: $1,179.92 - Monthly Principal & Interest $353,976.77 - Total of 300 Payments $183,976.77 - Total Interest Paid The pro of a 10-year plan: Cheapest plan where you're leaving your money out there only for 10 years with compounded interest With the 25-year plan, more interest is added even if you have lower monthly payment Now, picture this scenario: Medical school debt: $170,000 Period: 10 years Monthly principal and interest: Around $2,000/month payment Consider your income: The average residency salary: $50,000 After withholdings: $3,400/month Subtract that with rent, utility bills, insurance, food, cars, gasoline… How much do you have left? Other existing, older repayment plans Graduated plans Graduated plan is when you’re paying so much for months or a year, it goes up a little next two years and then the next. (Balloon Mortgage) Standard/graduated plans are more challenging for you live off of ICR (Income Contingent) Private loans: Ask your lender what options you have for deferment after you graduate Newer payment plans: Income-based repayment plans/Income-driven plans/Pay-As-You-Earn They look at your discretionary income assuming only small percentages of that and deriving your monthly payment Major qualification: Partial financial hardship (if your loan amount far exceeds 10%-20% of your income So how much do you have to pay for per month if you opt for the income-derived plans? 20% plan: $642/month 15% plan: $410/month Pay-As-You-Earn: $273/month *Remember, this is based on your income so if your income increases, the exact amount may vary. Benefits of the newer repayment plans: Gives you breathing room with modest loan repayments *These are all U.S. Government plans and only apply to the government or federal student loans Loan forgiveness: With some of the plans, the government will forgive your debt after a certain number of payments, which is great! However, you might be taxed on the difference though. Benefits of Federal loans: They are better because of the safety and protection They don't capitalize the interest while you're in school They have loan forgiveness plans The "public service loan forgiveness" plan: Doesn't have to be consecutive At least 30 hours a week in the not-for-profit When preparing to go on your interviews, ask two questions: Are you a not-for-profit? Who will pay me? *Around 80%-90% of hospitals are not-for-profit What happens to U.S. medical school graduates not getting residency spots? They have protections. In-school deferments Forbearance (doesn't hurt your credit and buys you time for about 6 months) Employment deferment Tony recommends to go into one of these income plans. You would have no income so they would give you a zero payment and the months would still count. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Allow yourself to have as many options at the end of the day. Stay with federal student loans over private loans to have more flexibility. Be more mindful of your credit card debt. Use credit cards wisely. Use them for emergencies. They are not a lifestyle! Talk to a tax expert and a financial planner to determine what’s best for you. Links and Other Resources: Session 21: Medical School Financial Planning Expert Interview What Tax Bracket Am I In? Federal Student Aid - Understanding Repayment Plans Repayment Schedule Estimator Federal Student Aid - Repay Your Loans Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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52 min
September 16, 2013
43: MCAT 2015 - Everything You Need to Know Now
Session 43 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Owen Farcy, Director of MCAT 2015 at Kaplan and host of The Pulse, Kaplan's monthly webinar series. They talk all about the changes in MCAT, basically everything that you need to know as a student to prepare for the new MCAT, whether or not you should take the new MCAT or whether you need to take it earlier than you were expecting. Don't forget to check out this page to say thanks to Kaplan for coming on the podcast. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Owen: Questions to ask yourself: Are you solely dedicated to medicine? Are you willing to essentially give up the next 5-10 years of your life to focus on the educational process? Life experience as the edge of nontraditional students: But show how special you are! Why is the MCAT changing now? Current MCAT has really been around for a long time Science has changed drastically the last time AAMC went closely at the blueprint for the MCAT and so MCAT seeks to address these changes Big changes to expect from MCAT 2015: Removal of the writing sample Addition of three new subjects: Biochemistry, Psychology, and Sociology (Add three additional semesters' worth of work prior to the MCAT) Duration of the test from 4 hours to 7.5 hours Raw skills for Scientific Inquiry and Reasoning Skills focused more on research findings (your ability to interpret charts and research that you're reading) Factors for the addition of behavioral sciences: The way medicine is practiced now is very different than it was Team-based approach to medicine Understanding interpersonal dynamics is important in the MCAT Understanding a multicultural background Understanding why we make the decisions we make A look at preventive care system and chronic disease system The idea of patient autonomy The common misconception students have about the MCAT that the MCAT is a science test. It's a critical thinking test that has a lot of scientific content on it. The scoring scale system for the new MCAT How Kaplan is keeping up with the changes: Making students aware of the drastic changes coming Brand new MCAT course Taking a broad look of what's happening in education in general to create a course that will carry them through the 21st century Taking the current MCAT versus the new one? The fear of the unknown Think carefully which version of the test really caters toward your skill set Some pieces of advice for premed students: Take a deep breath. It does seem stressful. But take a step back and consider where you're at. Start planning for it right now. Reach out to your premedical advisor and make sure you know which courses at your university should you be taking to start preparing for it. Links and Other Resources: Kaplan's MCAT 2015 Page with sign up for the MCAT 2015 Practice Test The Pulse - Monthly Pre-med Webinar Series Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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34 min
September 11, 2013
42: Correcting Course - Falling Down During Med School
Session 42 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Brandi Sinkfield, an attending general anesthesiologist who has had her fair share of struggles along the path to medical school. Having taken the MCAT twice and restarting her first year in medical school, Brandi is a concrete proof that you are allowed to struggle as a premed and still continue to become a physician. It's not a matter of how many times you've fallen down but it's about learning to get back up after each fall. Listen in and learn about Brandi's transition from undergrad to medical school, her challenges and mistakes, and what she did to correct her course and become the physician that she is now. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Brandi: Her undergrad path to medical school: Initially a traditional premed, got accepted to medical school Taking a year off and deferred admission to medical school Shadowing experience at a burn unit of the children's hospital Taking her MCAT while doing research at a neuroscience lab plus working at a summer program as a teaching assistant What she did during her year off: Planning to teach in Japan until 9/11 took place Ending up working as a waitress for 6 months which helped develop her people skills Her struggles at the beginning of medical school: Her studying style changed for the worse as she was trying to adapt to others’ study techniques Doing her research and restarting her first year of medical school Physical exercise as an important aspect of her overall well-being Realizing she was not alone in starting again and collaborating with a study buddy What she took to correct her course: Letting go of studying techniques that didn't work Teaching herself out loud using a whiteboard Some pieces of advice for premed students: Keep your head up. Stay positive. There are more positive things going on than the negative. It can be competitive but it doesn't mean it cannot be done. There are many roads to success so you can do it! Links and Other Resources: How to Fix a Medical School Application After Starting Premed Poorly - Interview with Dr. Polites from Wash U. Ryan's article on KevinMD: Treating the enemy still requires respect and professionalism Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
September 4, 2013
41: Find the 'Art of Medicine' with Dr. Reiff-Pasarew
Session 41 In this episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Faye Reiff-Pasarew of The Art of Medicine Podcast. Faye is an artist by heart but seeing that being a physician was the best fit for her career-wise and it was something she would see herself doing day in and day out, she decided to dive into the world of medicine where she is currently a 3rd-year internal medicine resident at Mount Sinai in New York City. Her podcast is amazing (we're playing a clip of it at the beginning of this episode) where she is able to creatively integrate her two passions - art and medicine. Ryan was initially blown away by the quality of her podcast which is no wonder why it landed the number one spot on the iTunes' New & Noteworthy for a number of weeks. But there is so much more to that. Listen in to follow her amazing nontraditional path to medicine and learn from her artful experiences. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Faye: Faye's nontraditional path to medicine: Her interest in creative writing and theater Her first two years of college studying English and French literature and writing and theater Discovering she wasn't enjoying by the middle of her 2nd year Switched her major to international development focusing on African development particularly women's health Traveling and doing research on women's public health in Africa for several months Traveling to Vietnam and South Africa Her thought process for switching majors: Studying what you enjoy doing but not thinking what career you're going to end up with it The difference between doing something and wanting to do a job that studying that thing leads to Assessing what characteristics of the job would she be enjoying day in and day out for a long time Her first exposure to medicine was doing public health research in Camaron and seeing deliveries and medical procedures Considering nursing focused on public health or a public health degree but realizing nothing is going to be the same as being the doctor Deciding to take a post bac program Taking the postbac program and applying to medical school: Applying to an organized postbac program at Bryn Mawr - Philadelphia, where she had to live there for two years but changed her mind again and decided not to push through Moving to Brooklyn with her friends, taking her postbac classes at Brooklyn College, and finishing the rest at NYU Working at Planned Parenthood in New York for a year while applying to medical school and ended up going to University of California - San Francisco Tips in doing your extracurriculars: Don't overthink it too much. You might find yourself strategizing something and realizing it's not something you want to do. Go and do something you are passionate about. Do what you think you will enjoy. It's not about checking the boxes on your application. Doing the things you love help you figure out who you are and they make you a full person and a better person in whatever field you're in Things that drew her to Mt. Sinai: Doing her internal medicine residency at Mt. Sinai, New York Amazing palliative care program FlexMed program Academy for Medicine and Humanities where there is a intersection between arts and science On The Art of Medicine Podcast: Missing the humanities side of things and finding a way to combine it with her medical work Getting involved with The Academy at Mt. Sinai Teaching a narrative medicine class - stories about the human experience of health Using her previous radio background along with her love for humanities and podcast as the perfect media to show the intersection between medicine and the humanities Interviewing interesting people doing great things on the fringes of art and medicine Medicine as less flexible: Technology as getting in the way of human connection The importance of retaining human connection Looking at health and illness from the perspective of patients, historians, and artists Links and Other Resources: The Art of Medicine Podcast - iTunes Link Columbia Postbac Program Podcast Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai - FlexMed Podcast Course description for Narrative Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine Academy for Medicine and the Humanities The Art of Medicine Facebook page Email Faye at faye@theartofmedicinepodcast.com Session 10: Interview with Columbia Postbac Premed Program Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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40 min
August 30, 2013
Special Session : Update with @PremedPrincess_ Turned Med Student
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11 min
August 28, 2013
40: Bench to the Bedside - MD/PhD Student Interview
Session 40 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Hanna about MD/PhD programs, one of the many other dual degree programs such as MD/MPH, MD/MBA and more. Even DO schools have tons of dual degree programs as well. Hanna is currently starting her first year in the MD/PhD program and she talks about what her life is like having an interesting path being a late premed and some differences in the application process between applying to an MD program and an MD/PhD program. Don't forget to send Hanna a tweet! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Hanna: MD/PhD programs: Generally called the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) funded through the NIH More regulated structure 2 years medical school - 4 years PhD - 2 years in medical school Hanna's path to the MD/PhD program: Her parents as a big influence with them wanting her to get into medicine Going with pharmacy in high school (out of rebellion) and liking research in college Getting into a research lab in a cancer center Finding out about the MD/PhD program two days before taking her GRE Signing up for the MCAT and meeting the director of the MD/PhD program at her campus Doing volunteering plus research Spending a solid month working on her personal statements Studying for the MCAT: Going back to those items she got wrong, taking notes on why she got them wrong, and repeat the section a few days later Getting a 35! (with one month of studying, never taking a full practice test) Taking an extensive coursework which helped her with her MCAT Applying to MD program versus applying to MD/PhD programs: Personal statement: Writing 3 - 1 for research, 1 for combined MD/PhD and 1 for MD Secondaries have MD/PhD-specific questions Choosing the schools she applied to: Only doing MSTP programs to be able to get funding from the NIH Choosing locations and look into those that have research she wanted to do Her interview experience: Multiple interview/one-one interview days (eight 30-minute interviews) Panel interview (short interview; less on medicine and more on the research) Some pieces of advice for premed students who want to pursue an MD/PhD path: Get research experience as soon as possible to know if it's something you do as well as to help build your research experience. Links and Other Resources: Tweet Hanna @mdphdtobe AAMC MD/PhD Information Barron's MCAT with CD-ROM University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Hanna's Blog Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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36 min
August 21, 2013
39: Resident Duty Hours and the Ripple Effect
Session 39 In this episode, Ryan and Allison discuss a controversial topic, which is huge in residency today, specifically the residency work hour restrictions. Even if you're still a premed, you need to understand that the amount of time residents work currently is much less than it used to be. As the house staff, residents practically live in the hospital to be able care for the patients. A brief history of the Libby Zion Law Switch to 36-hour work shifts until in 1984 when a patient Libby ZIon died in New York Two years later, the courts ruled that her death was the cause of resident fatigue from the 36-hour shifts and a lack of oversight from attending physicians. As a result, that state of New York has put a limit on resident work hours. ACGME, the oversight body for all residencies in the US has also put a work hour restriction for everybody to where there is just an 80-hour averaged workweek for all residents and fellows. Recently, that has been changed to 16-hour max workdays for interns with no overnight call, a 24-hour patient care and 4-hour transition of care period for residents. So you would expect a decrease in medical errors now that residents are more rested, right? Wrong. An article in the New Yorker about Why Doesn't Medical Care Get Better When Doctors Rest More as well as lots of research coming out actually suggest that the work hour restrictions are actually not increasing patient care results. In fact, there is an increase of medical errors reported by residents. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Sleep deprivation is an underappreciated problem: A cause of cognitive impairment Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and other serious medical problems Just as dangerous as drinking and driving since your judgment will be severely impaired Increased risk of driving accidents The consequences of the changes in work hour restrictions: More handoffs Patient handoff is when a physician currently working in a hospital hands off the patient and patient care to another physician that's coming in to take over for that patient to replace that physician so he/she can go home and sleep. The covering doctor doesn't know the story or what happened the course of the hospital stay They only get snippets of to-do items left over from the list Lack of contacts Patients and families are meeting more physicians. Physicians are knowing their patients less and vice versa. Unfortunately, the patient-family dynamics that you get to learn is not part of the handoff. Doctor-patient relationship is broken down due to the lapses in the continuity of care The change in education of residents, interns, and medical students Disrupted rounds Interns and medical students lose out on the attending physician's expertise and teaching Not seeing the evolution of illness The ripple effects: Less hours working, more hours resting Hospital's struggle to have same number hours a day and same amount of work with less people to work those hours and Increase cost to hospitals with a Huge rise in the need for assisted healthcare professionals, PAs Decrease in hours, increase in errors Links and Other Resources: Why doesn't medical care get better when doctors rest more? A brief history of duty hours and resident education Libby Zion Law Doctors-in-training spend very little time at patient bedside, study finds Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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37 min
August 14, 2013
38: How to Write Personal Statements with Dr. Arora
Session 38 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Vineet Arora from FutureDocsBlog.com about writing personal statements, whether including a quote in your personal statement is a great idea or whether it's wise to mention things like depression or other mental health issues. Vineet is the Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency and Assistant Dean of Scholarship & Discovery at the Pritzker School of Medicine for the University of Chicago. She has been in the residency recruitment committee for the past 10 years. She coaches people in writing personal statements and worked as a career advisor in the medical school. Listen in to find out more about the do's and don'ts when writing your personal statements. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Vineet: Vineet's path to medicine: Premed at John Hopkins University, Major in Biology Went to medical school at WashU in St. Louis when she was 20 years old Finishing residency and pursuing a public policy degree Maturity level as one of the things the admissions committee look at Things to keep in mind when writing personal statements: It's not about you. It's about your journey. It's about what makes you unique and a good fit for the career and program. The personal statement does not get you the interview but it's a very big part of the impression you leave on your interview day and can be a memorable part of your application. Most of the time, interviews are granted based on: The competitiveness of your numbers/your test scores. Fit for the program Do’s and Don’ts in Writing Your Personal Statement: Don't talk about the field. Talk about who are you and why are you interested in medicine and what you have to offer Open your personal statement with the most interesting and fun thing you've done. It makes you more distinctive. Don't make it like a SOAP note. Anything radical is a no-no. Don't make it too short. Don't make it too long. The right length is just about a page. End on a positive. Put your best foot forward. It's more genuine to answer what challenges you faced than on a piece of paper. Some red flags in a personal statement you need to avoid: Not making it too personal. This is an oxymoron with people having to write personal statements yet they're having a hard time writing about themselves. Anything that questions your ability to be a good candidate and complete the training program you're joining. Disclosing that you have a personal illness is a very personal matter. Seek consultation from people to decide whether it's the appropriate thing to do. If you're battling with a chronic illness that will make people wonder if you can do the job, Vineet recommends to not include it. Disclosing too much dirty laundry may not be the best idea. Highlighting challenges you faced before even going to the next change. Disclosing mental health issues like depression Depression is common but the medical field is challenging and a stressor. Is it okay to put quotes in personal statements? It has to be really meaningful and well-placed. Do not open with a quote. You don't want to open with someone else's quote as your personal statement. The first line is often what dictates who you are at your interview. You may end with a quote as long as it's well done. The quote must say something about you and your likes that would be helpful. Use quotes very sparingly. Taking the time to write your personal statement: Show it to others. Get feedback. Take it back and revise. Work on it twice a week and once a week for the next few weeks. It takes several weeks for it to really mature and come together. On medical students rotating on the services of the hospital you're applying residency to: She advises not to rotate if you think you've got your numbers and you think you're going to get an interview. Do not audition beforehand because that gives people more data points and it could backfire. Be cognizant that you are on an interview the entire time you're there. Be as unobtrusive as possible and you want to be a part of the team. The residents are part of the interview team so keep that in mind. Be helpful to them. Get a pulse on the place. Meet with the program directors and other people. Understand who drives recruitment and see if you can get your name or face in front of the person so they know who you are before recruitment season starts. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Let people you know read your personal statement as well as people who don't know you to avoid bias, balance your personal statement, and see it all come together. Links and Other Resources: FutureDocs Blog Follow @FutureDocs University of Chicago Department of Medicine Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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36 min
August 7, 2013
37: Welcome to Your 3rd Year of Medical School
Session 37 Eat When You Can, Sleep When You Can, Don't F&*k With The Pancreas
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39 min
July 31, 2013
36: Life as a Flight Surgeon & Our New Project
Session 36 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Allison, err... Allison talks with Ryan. Yep! She's going to interview him today to talk about what life is like to be a flight surgeon, his path to aerospace medicine, . Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: What is a flight surgeon? No, a flight surgeon does not operate on a plane. A flight surgeon is a family practice doctor for a specific population of air force members such as pilots, loadmasters, flight engineers, missile operators, space operators, drone pilots, air traffic controllers, or anybody involved in the day-to-day operations in the air force. Ryan is the medical standards expert and he makes sure they meet all those medical standards and are able to continue their job. He has an office (on the ground) though he is required to fly once a week in order to make sure his patient is safe doing what they do in the sky and to see what their stressors are day in and day out. Flight Medicine Course Allows you to learn how stressful it is to be in a cockpit and fly a plane and the amount of stimuli when you get over-saturated with the tasks to be done. Ryan's path to being a flight surgeon: Wanting to be an orthopedic surgeon and going to medical school on the Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP) in the military The military having control in his residency application Applying to the military version of the match and cutting his postgrad education off and going through 1-year residency training to become a flight surgeon Differences in civilian medicine vs. military medicine Thinking about their conditions in terms of military service No insurance difficulties (since everyone in the military is insured) Some perks in the military: Being called "sir' all day long Saluting officers in higher ranks Respect and teamwork are very evident Jumping in the plane as an aircrew member Things Ryan love about being a flight surgeon: Community involvement Unique patient population (patients avoid him because they love to work and they desperately love to get better immediately) The other thing Ryan and Allison talk about is The MSHQ Academy, a new project that was born from talking to you. Ryan and Allison talked to dozens of students and heard the same thing over and over. You want a community of members that you can trust. A community that won't try to cut you down. A community that you can get motivation from. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Look into the military for a possible job or career to pay for medical school Be flexible. Be willing to have a bit of adventure. Be willing to give up a little bit of control of your life. Links and Other Resources: The Academy HPSP Info If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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34 min
July 23, 2013
35: How to Fix an App After Starting Premed Poorly
Session 35 If you start out as premed and don't do quite as well as you want, you have to ask yourself "How badly do I want this?" - Dr. Polites If you've got a poor grade in any course and you think that it's all over, well, it's not. In today's episode, Ryan welcomes back Dr. Greg Polites for the second time on the show as they talk about how to fix your application after starting off poorly as a premed, the thought process, solutions to some possible scenarios, and red flags in applications and what to avoid. Also learn about the worst AMCAS application photos submitted. Dr. Polites is affiliated with the Washington University in St. Louis where he serves as a premed advisor, an associate professor of Emergency Medicine, a member of the admissions committee, and a course master for the practice of medicine for 1st and 3rd year medical students. He also runs the premed course at Washington University called MedPrep with 90% of all premed students in WashU-St. Louis taking such course. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dr. Greg Polites: Greg's path to medicine: Not having a great start at college Going to business school and getting bored Taking his postbac and getting focused on medicine Running into an emergency physician who didn't start college strongly Correcting course: How badly do you need this? What do you need to do to really focus and do well? Look at your strengths and weaknesses. Look at your overall academic performance. Have an organized, thoughtful plan Make use of every resource available to you Tutoring services Prehealth advising system Should you retake the course if you get a C? Move forward and do better in a higher level course in the same discipline Retake the course if you didn't learn the fundamentals well enough Trying to boost up your GPA isn't the only thing you need to demonstrate How well do you know the information? How well did you learn what you need to learn? How are you doing overall? Have a more extensive plan of taking 1 or 2 years as a postbac Factors for poor grades: Overextending yourself early on in college Underestimation of how difficult the coursework and exams can be Not taking advantage of the resources and help that they can get Greg recommends: Be a bookworm in the first 6 months of college. Limit what you do in that first 6 months to one activity outside of class time Start out school slowly and ease into it Possible scenarios: 2 years in and walking the line of a 3.0 GPA, should you move forward with taking the MCAT? Have a very clear understanding of where you're going to be at the time you file your application Take some gap years. Figure out when to take your MCAT and if you're ready to take the MCST Look at a 2-year plan where you look at 2 additional postbac years of serious coursework plus 1 year of doing something while in the application process Taking Master's program over postbac: Master's degree: will give you strong undergrad GPA Can be pretty costly DIY postbac at a local community college: Greg recommends taking it at a full four-year university You need to demonstrate that you can handle the coursework for medical school It's important to take a full course load 2-year structured programs are better as you get advising along the way Taking a June MCAT and wait till they get the score back before applying: Get your application within the first 6 weeks AMCAS opens You should have lodged the application by mid-July (end of July the latest) Make it as simple as possible: Know the timeline. Plan well. Make sure you have all your letters of recommendation in early. When you're ready to send it, send it. Talk to your prehealth advisors in your junior year A  re-applicant in the eyes of the admissions committee: They will open your old application and compare it with the current application and see the difference Slow down and really take an honest look of what you need to do to improve your application The application process can tell a lot about the applicant itself: Applying early Picture submitted Spelling errors The importance of having a good profile picture to be submitted: Greg shares the worst images submitted in the application Showing respect for the process Red flags in the application: Any part that makes the application unbalanced. Applying late Some pieces of advice for premed students: Medicine is a field where not everything is going to go your way all the time. You have to be somebody who stays steadfast and doesn't give up. You want to go to medical school with a strong foundation. If you didn't do well in your courses early on, build a stronger foundation. Links and Other Resources: Session 23 with Dr. Polites - MSHQ 023 : Interview with Dr. Polites of MedPrep at Wash. U. MedPrep at Washington University in St. Louis Washington University School of Medicine in St. Loius Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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53 min
July 14, 2013
34: #RespectTheMCAT with @PremedP
Session 34 Update - Marteney got into medical school! Check out the quick update here. In this episode, Ryan talks with Marteney, otherwise known as @premedprincess_ on Twitter with over 9,000 followers and spreading the premed gospel on Twitter. She shares with us her experience going through the premed process, her premed path, why she did not #RespectTheMCAT, and how she corrected the course. Marteney also shares how she’s helping other premed students by giving a lot of encouragement and motivation. As premeds, you need to understand that MCAT is a test like no other. It is a beast that challenges your thinking ability running for 4-5 hours. It's not a test of knowledge but a test to see how well you can take tests. But it's not a hurdle you can't surpass as long as you come very well-prepared. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Marteney: Marteney's premed path: Taking anatomy in high school and loving it ever since Volunteering and shadowing experiences College years majoring in Biology Participating in sports in high school and college Marteney's experience with the MCAT: Not knowing about MCAT until junior year without any premed program in their undergrad Not taking any prep courses and just bought the first MCAT test prep book she found at their local bookstore Studying the MCAT only days before test date Retaking the MCAT: Scheduling another date with only two months to study Not studying enough for the second one, taking only one practice test Applying to medical school: Not knowing what really a DO was and applying late and now being wait listed Applying to 3 MD and 1 DO schools all in her state (on her first application) Now applying to 6 DO schools and 2 MD schools Retaking the MCAT a third time: Examkrackers Doing practice test once a week simulating real conditions (back to back to back) Being @premedprincess_: Almost a year since the account began with now almost 10,000 followers Getting good feedback Setting up an email account so students can contact her and ask her any questions Creating the ask.fm account where they can ask questions Sharing her experiences so other premeds can learn too Some pieces of advice for premed students: It's never too early to start preparing for the MCAT. Practice, practice, practice. Examkrackers, Kaplan, Princeton Review - whatever suits you. Take MCAT in the Spring of your Junior year to allow you to get your score back before you apply. In case, you don't do as well as you wanted then you can re-think submitting the applications. Don't count out DO schools. Consider applying to both MD and DO schools. Apply to as many school as you can. Every school looks for something different in an applicant as they try to piece together the perfect community of students to make up their class for that year. Links and Other Resources: Examkrackers Books Kaplan Princeton Review Check out Session 2 and Session 17 for more great info about the MCAT, as well as the MCAT and MCAT Prep posts. Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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38 min
July 10, 2013
33: Transitioning to Medical School - How it Begins!
Session 33 In this episode, Ryan and Allison talk about their experiences as they transitioned into medical school. First off, congratulations to Allison for graduating from her residency training and she's now out in the "real" world. Today, they recall the experiences they’ve had as first year medical students, the struggles they’ve had and the fun things along the way. Hopefully, you get to pick up lessons and learn what things can be expected once you step into medical school. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Allison's adjustments in taking the steps into medical school: Change in environment from MA to NY Living in medical school dorms Feeling of excitement to be finally in medical school Orientation on a boat cruise! Hitting the ground running Considerations in choosing which medical school to apply to: Location, setting, environment Know what fits you Observe life at the campus Walking into the anatomy lab: Getting used to the environment and the smell (you're not going to be smelly everyday though) Respect for every cadaver is important Treat the cadaver like your real patient Be prepared for the goo factor Learning Anatomy and Histology: Learning all the materials for Anatomy and Histology and balancing your focus (Ryan failed his first Histology test but learned to balance things) Medical schools will do everything they can to help you succeed Females - don't wear high heels inside the room during practical tests. It can be too noisy. "Drinking from the firehose" Their memorable experiences in first year: Studying - hours and hours of studying! Studying at the Atlanta Bread Company Being absorbed into a new world Disconnection from family members: Family getting confused at where you're at Having trouble connecting with people not going through medical school Starting to learn another language in medicine The impact of course work on your board score: Adopting the mentality that everything counts! Scribe services and different learning styles: Your school might have that where they offer recorded lectures and transcripts Figure out which style of learning works for you best See it, hear it, say it, and write it Planning your first summer: Take the opportunity to explore your interest - shadowing, research, volunteering, etc. Ryan took a trip to San Antonio with the Air Force Allison had a shadowing opportunity that led to her career as a neurologist Some pieces of advice for premed students: Stay ahead of the game. It will only get harder once you get behind. Figure out what works for you. Don't compare your study style with others' Stay sane. Exercise. Eat well. It's a crazy year but it's a great first year! Links and Other Resources: Pancakes Every Day! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5RapBjos3I If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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43 min
June 21, 2013
32: Top 7 Things You Should Know as a Medical Student
Session 32 As a result of last week’s Session 31 - 8 Pieces of Information Every Premed Should Know which got great responses, Ryan and Allison follow it up with today’s episode as they share with you medical school tips and specifically talk about the 7 things you should know as you enter medical school and stuff they have known a little bit more in their medical school journey. We hope the discussion today will help you as you go along your own path into medicine. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: Medical school is a whole level of smart. Don't be discouraged. You can't be the best at everything. You need to do well but you don't have to be the best in medical school. Don't be intimidated being surrounded by a lot of smart people. Don’t compare yourself or compete with others. Your only competition is you. Try different study habits until you find what works for you best. Know yourself and how you study the best. Be willing to adjust as necessary. Try different study habits and ask around to see what other people are doing. Your old study habits may no longer serve you in medical school. Find a study buddy or a study group to keep you motivated. Medicine like drinking from a fire hose or eating 10 pancakes a day Expose yourself early to your school's residency program. If your school has a residency program where you're doing clinical rotations, introduce yourself early to the program director and get to know the residents. Start asking about research opportunities since many residencies will expect research experience in a particular area so be on the lookout as early on. Take care of yourself. Diet, exercise, and sleep all have profound effects on your cognition and memory. Ryan and Allison have this old expression in medical school, ""Eat when you can, sleep when you can, and don't f#$% with the pancreas." Find a way to relax your mind and vent out your fears, anxiety, and frustrations. Build a support structure around you to talk to people. Learn from your patients. When you start your clinical years, you'll have so many books to read but you can't read them cover to cover and expect to learn them all. The best strategy is "just in time" learning where you learn from your patients. As you encounter a patient, go learn about the disease your patient is currently being treated for to help you learn more. Read about the topic as you're admitting the patient. You'll have a better chance of answering once you're being pimped (happens during rounds when the attending or resident calls you out and asks you questions and expect you to know things) Plus you will remember your patients years later! The Boards USMLE Step 1 for MD schools Take a listen to our podcast about the USMLE Step 1 here. COMLEX for DO schools These tests are the biggest factors on your residency applications so you have to do well in them Do well in your classwork and learn during your first two years Becoming a professional test taker in medical school Important things to consider: Geography makes things competitive More medical students graduating while residency spots are limited Coursework is a large factor Residency Application Timing Apply early to residency. When you start getting interview requests, remember that's it going to be sent to many so it's like a race for you to get your spot. First come, first serve basis Links and Other Resources: Check out this YouTube video describing how medicine is like eating 10 pancakes a day. Case Files: Pharmacology 3e If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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34 min
June 20, 2013
31: 8 Pieces of Information Every Premed Should Know
Session 31 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about the 8 key pieces of information every premed should know as they're going through this journey.. No perfect applicant There is no one picture of a perfect applicant that you need to fit into. Be who you are. Don't figure out what boxes to check because there's no such thing as a checklist. The admissions committee is looking for what makes you unique, not a "cookie cutter" applicant Choosing your undergrad Ryan chose an undergrad based on an athletic program over academics Allison chose McGill in Canada which has a European method of teaching with narrow coursework Several Canadian universities do not inflate grades and more interested in taking students from their own provinces If you go to a Canadian medical school, you're not considered a foreign medical graduate in the US BS/MD programs These are 7 or 8-year BS/MD programs wherein you apply to an undergrad program and be accepted into medical school at the same time Broaden your coursework FlexMed program is a 7- year program where you get to apply to medical school as a sophomore in college. If you get accepted, you no longer have to take the MCAT and you get the chance to bring in some diversity into your courses. Respect the MCAT The MCAT is a test like no other. One of the most common mistakes students make is underestimating the MCAT thinking you're doing well with your undergrad. It tests your ability to take the MCAT. You need to do practice tests under real conditions Prep courses are great but be sure to do practice tests Apply broadly. The average number of medical schools to apply to is 14.5 but apply as many schools as you can Be open to the possibility of going to a school out of your region Find a school that is going to match with you Apply early but not on the first day. Delay a couple of days to a week to let the glitches in the system (if there are any) to work themselves out The further you go along in the application cycle, the less chances of you getting an interview Medical school application is like a game of musical chairs - the sooner you get a chair, the better Enjoy the journey! Take time to enjoy the ride. Take time to soak in those moments of being a college student. Although you also need to delay gratification at times whenever appropriate. Life is about balance. Links and Other Resources: Session 16 - Interview with Mount Sinai - All About FlexMed LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine Johns Hopkins School of Medicine The George Washington University School of Medicine Georgetown University School of Medicine M Prep MCAT Anytime eCourse Review If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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30 min
June 18, 2013
30: Military Medical School and Medical Officer Life
Session 30 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Lt. Col (Dr.) Aaron Saguil, the Assistant Dean for Recruitment and Admissions at F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, better known to most people at USUHS (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences) or, in layman's term, the military medical school. It is an allopathic medical school where you apply to it just as you would to other allopathic schools through the AMCAS applications yet the only major difference for this school is you get paid to go to medical school. Your tuition is free plus you're getting paid as an active duty service member. Today, we cover things like information about who should consider applying to this school, careers in the military as a physician, deployments, and more topics about being a military physician. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dr. Saguil: His path to military medicine: Going to Duke University in his undergrad under ROTC scholarship with the Army Wanting to go to medical practice since high school His decision coming down to the proximity to his family Going to University of Florida under HPSP scholarship and had a fantastic four-year time Having service obligation from ROTC so he was dedicated to have a career in the military Spending his Family Medicine residency in Virginia Different opportunities he had after residency: Spending 2 and a half years in Germany and some traveling opportunities Wanting to do in-patient care and teaching responsibilities Being accepted into the Faculty Development Fellowship Program at Madigan Army Medical Center Earning his Masters of Public Health at the University of Washington Teaching and mentoring residents and doing in-patient care Serving as a student coordinator for medical students rotating with them Seeing the leadership side of medical education - taking his first deployment in Afghanistan for 15 months Being stationed in USUHS in Washington, D.C. for 9 months now serving as the assistant dean for recruitment and admissions About the HPSP Scholarship: Check out Session 18 About the Military Medical School Located in Bethesda, Maryland, 10-12 miles outside Washington, D.C. Conceived by an Act of Congress in 1972 and has graduated 5000 physicians An allopathic (MD) degree granting institution licensed by the ACME, the accrediting body for all medical schools in the US and Canada Tuition is free and you're getting paid $57,000 - $60,000 (for active duty service) Applying to the Military Medical School: Go through the AMCAS application They don't charge people to apply to their school They don't charge for the secondary applications Just because it's free doesn't mean you should go apply to their school Go apply if you like the idea of a service-oriented lifestyle or you want to be a part of something bigger than yourself Types of students that military medical school looks for: 1/3 of students have prior association with the military (ROTC, service academy, or previous active service) 2/3 of their class don't have prior military experience The common thread between these two groups is SERVICE Other things they look for: Shadowing experience Good, strong clinical letter of recommendation Has devoted a good portion of their life serving others (volunteering experience) Having the motivation Rate of burnout is high in primary care Having something that pulls you out of bed every morning Medical school life at the USUHS versus 'normal' medical school: 18-12-18 system Pre-clinic (18 months) - lectures and mandatory small groups Clinical rotations (12 months) - opportunity to travel to their multi-treatment faciltiies in Hawaii, Washington state, Texas, and Florida Preparing for residency applications and sub-I's (18 months) No mandatory PT! Living off-campus Getting paid to go to medical school USUHS vs. HPSP scholarship: HPSP has a fixed stipend that adjusts with inflation each year If you're looking for a service-oriented field within medicine, you need financial assistance to attend medical school, or the military is appealing to you, apply to both USUHS and HPSP. Each year, USUHS only brings around 63 army physicians and 52 physicians for the navy and the air force and only 4 for the public health service. Each year, the HPSP program brings in over 200 for each of those branches (army, navy, and air force) Restrictions on specialty or residency training: No restrictions Every year, they have 800 graduating students between USHUS and HPSP program The same number of spots in residency programs in their military graduate medical education system Military matching - students compete for military training spots Guaranteed internship The GMO (General Medical Officer)/Flight Surgeon Spot: Having done 1-year or transitional year internship and going on to serve specific cool jobs Having the opportunity to reapplying to the residency of your choice GMO time gives you credit towards your residency program Having the fear of the unknown 2 Key things for you to succeed in the military: Flexibility Optimism Career tracks as a military medical officer: Clinical Operational Executive positions Academic Research Settings for sub-specialties: Community clinic type Community hospital Tertiary care facility Deployments as a physician: Every 3-4 years on average depending on specialty, geographic location, and seniority (during the war in Afghanistan) Army - 9 months Navy - 6-7 months Air force - 3-6 months What happens to your family during deployment especially if you're a single parent? Family Readiness Plan (FRP) How competitive it is to get into USUSHS: 3,000 applications 500-600 students for interview 171 seats to be admitted Avg GPA: 3.5 Avg MCAT: 31 They will view postbac work in lieu of your time as an undergrad Some pieces of advice for premed students: The military is not for everyone. Part of the military is living up to the legacy that Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy about taking care of the wounded, the widow and the orphan. Links and Other Resources: Session 18: Air Force - HPSP Scholarship Info Interview USUHS Prospective Students If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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44 min
June 12, 2013
29: Interview with ZDoggMD, Yes - he is a real doctor
Session 29 In this episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Zubin Damania, a.k.a. ZDoggMD, a hospitalist, healthcare visionary and internet personality as they talk about his path to medicine, his struggles, and the exciting Downtown Project in Las Vegas, Nevada. Here are the highlights of the conversation with ZDoggMD: When he knew he wanted to become a doctor: Born to parents who are doctors Doing medicine as a rebellion to spite his parents but liking science at the same time Having the idealism at the back of his mind to make a difference by helping people Finding the actual practice as disconcerting The negative side of medicine: The stress of running your own business when you're not trained to do His medical school years: Going to UC Berkeley as an undergrad in 3 years Nothing as conceptually too difficult Not getting prepared for his first clinical year during the third year - Pass-Fail-Honor Faking his way through the process as he was getting incredibly depressed Finding the importance of getting support from colleagues The haphazard system of having varying degrees of experience His three-year undergrad experience in Berkeley: Major in biology and minor in music Starting to get tired of college by his second year Spending his fourth year at Berkeley lab doing genetics research that he liked Realizing research wasn't something he wanted to do and reaffirming that going to medical school was the right answer Describing his Berkeley experience as the most brutal in terms of competition The ultimate goal as better patient care Choosing his specialty: Being influenced by a GI doc he knew Entered internal medicine residency with the intent of doing a GI fellowship Realizing he didn't like GI and the primary care setup Not having a job plan after residency, taking a time off, and going back to clinical medicine Taking a hospitalist job at Stanford The trends he's seeing in medicine: The super-specialization as a reaction to high debt loads and high pay Reimbursement, level of respect, and basic job structure as the main drivers for people staying away from primary care His ideas of fixing primary care: Fair compensation with a job structure where they could help people More precision functions taken over by other entities like nurse practitioners or health coaches Taking insurance out of primary care and basing it on a flat fee membership model Ways to motivate patients to go to a doctor: Taking away any transactional barrier Paying for the relationship with the team rather than a transactional, episodic visit Fixing the current service fees system and replace it with a more sensible one for both providers and patients Zubin describes their exciting project in Las Vegas: A three-tiered model Starting with a 7,000-sq.ft. clinic in downtown Las Vegas First piece: Financial disruption - Get insurance out! Funding through the flat-fee membership of patients Second piece: The care team - The village-type scenario Other community programs like yoga, meditation, and nutrition classes as part of the membership to tie all clinic members and the patients with the community they're in Third piece: Proprietary EMR they're developing with their partner Links and Other Resources: ZDoggMD YouTube Channel Downtown Project Homepage Ryan's article on Tiger Woods and the pre-med gunner mentality - KevinMD.com Free Will - Book by Sam Harris Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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44 min
June 5, 2013
28: The USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK with Dr. McInnis
Session 28 In this episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Mike McInnis, Chief Educator at Doctors in Training, a small company that focuses mainly on test prep specifically USMLE (United States Medical Licensing Exam) and COMLEX (Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination) to help prepare medical students pass the boards. Today, he talks about the USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 board exams, their importance on your path to residency, and studying strategies you can employ. COMLEX will be covered in a different podcast. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Mike: What is a USMLE Exam? A three-part test designed to test whether a medical student is knowledgeable enough to be licensed as a physician. USMLE Step 1 A long, computerized, multiple choice test based on basic sciences Usually taken at the end of the second year of medical school Used as a determining factor in residency application Doing well gives you better chances to the kind of residency you want Similar to the MCAT where you need to do well to get as many offers from the top residency programs you want to get into Changing from knowledge-based test to a more clinical/patient-centered exam From NRMP Charting Outcomes 2011[/caption] USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge) Computer-based, multiple choice test moving away from the basic sciences and more toward actual patient care such How to make diagnosis, what diagnostic tests should you order for a patient based on clinical data and history, lab findings to expect,  and the beginnings of treatment Mostly taken at the tail-end of 3rd year or beginning of your 4th year where at this point you've already been exposed to patient care during clinical years Designed to test a medical student whether they're able to function at a level appropriate for a senior level medical student USMLE Step 2 CS (Clinical Skills) Setting you up with mock patients (actors paid to act as patients) Expensive test as you will be flying to the site since they are only offered in 5-6 testing locations throughout the country Taking histories, doing physical exams, writing a SOAP note that integrates it all with a good assessment and plan Total of 12 patient encounters Is Step 2 important for residency? Yes, residency programs directors still look at your Step 2 scores and it may affect your chances to match Average Step 2 score being considerably higher than Step 1 score Step 3 Taken after the intern year (first year of residency training) May be required in some residency programs before moving to 2nd or 3rd year of residency No full medical license until you've passed all three steps Mostly covers basic general medical conditions About Doctors in Training: Online USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK test products Also offers COMLEX products as well as anatomy and others Around 75 hours of video-based lectures with study guide Helping medical students bring the stuff out of their memory review the course Some pieces of advice for premed students: The best way to prepare for the Step 1 exam is to do well in your coursework in medical school. Learn pharmacology and pathology as much as you can. Do not ignore Connect with Dr. McInnis on Twitter @DrMcInnisDIT Links and Other Resources: USMLE Site USMLE Step 1 Question Formats USMLE Step 2 CK Question Formats USMLE Step 2 CS Tools USMLE Step 2 CS Patient Notes Doctors in Training USMLE Books First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2013 (First Aid USMLE) First Aid for the USMLE Step 2 CK, Eighth Edition (First Aid USMLE) First Aid for the USMLE Step 2 CS, Fourth Edition (First Aid USMLE) COMLEX Books Amazon’s COMLEX books Save $225 on the Princeton Review's MCAT Ultimate or MCAT Self-Paced Prep Course through March 30th 2016 by going to www.princetonreview.com/podcast If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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51 min
May 24, 2013
27: The Non-Traditional Medical Student's Path
Session 27 In today's episode, Ryan talks Liza Thompson, a former director of the postbac programs at both Goucher College and Johns Hopkins with over 20 years of experience. She currently runs Thompson Advising, an advising company for medical school applicants and postbac applicants. Liza is an expert when it comes to nontraditional students and postbac programs which are the points of discussion for today's episode, specifically what exactly is a postbac program, the different types of postbac programs, and do-it-yourself (DIY) postbac programs, and most importantly, why highlighting your nontraditional path in your application is key to your success. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Liza: Liza's background in postbac premed programs: Started working with nontraditional premed students 20 years ago Coming across older students who are the typical career-changers back then In the last 7-10 years, the applicant pool to postbac programs have shifted to younger students What is a postbac program? A program designed for people who are either in the later part of college but later decide to go to medical school or people who are premeds that stumbled through undergrad and need more courses to build up their resume Formal postbac programs offer students the coursework needed to get into medical school Some programs have "linkage" agreements with various medical schools so they can fast-track their way to medical school. Who is the typical postbac student? Career-changer who didn't know they wanted to be a physician in their undergrad career Premed student who stumbled through undergrad and needs more courses to build up their resume Who is a nontraditional medical school applicant? Coming from many different fields and many undergrad disciplines Usually older than a typical medical school applicant Mostly humanities majors who have degrees in arts, history, English, psychology, economics, religion, etc. Career-changers who have been in their previous careers for 10 or more years For some various reasons (experiencing a friend's or family member's illness or death or witnessing a world event such as the 9/11), they decide to go to medical school 3 Traits of Non-Trads: Typically Older Typically Non-Science Majors Typically Prior Successful Career How medical schools view nontraditional students: Those who have been successful in their previous careers are viewed very favorably Those trying to find the correct path for them can be just as successful They have to get experience in medicine to prove to themselves that they are suited to the profession, they're comfortable with patients, and dedicated The need for motivation to help them get through really different coursework and serious clinical work Getting shadowing/volunteering experience as a nontrad: Contact your local hospital and volunteer office. Find a place that will give you an option to shadow outside business hours so you can do it at night.  (Hospitals are open 24/7 versus clinics) You need a shadowing/volunteering experience to really find out if this is something that you like. Where do you get the information or advising you need? Contact the premed advising office at your undergraduate institution. AAMC Postbac program list Types of postbac programs: Formal postbac programs Structured curriculum where you get everything you need to get into medical school Usually one-year intensive program Advising and MCAT prep Many have linkages to medical schools Record-enhancing postbac program/ Career-changer postbac program DIY postbac programs Cheaper than the formal programs Allows you to take the courses on your own (ex. University of Maryland Science in the Evening Program Advising not included (but you can probably use your undergrad premed advising office) Certificate Granting postbac Programs They give you a certificate once you finish a coursework (Doesn't matter whether you get a certificate or not. Medical schools don't care.) The biggest goals of postbac programs: Challenge you in the sciences to prove that you can handle medical school coursework and get the prerequisites you need To prepare you for the MCAT The downside of spreading out your postbac over a period of years: One-year intensive program proves to medical schools that you can handle it Spreading it out over a number of years might not prove to medical schools that you can handle a heavy load of classes What postbac programs are looking for in applicants: Strong academic record in the undergrad level Whether you're a fit to their environment Passion and dedication (need not be related to medicine) Strong history of community service Highlighting the non-traditional path: Medical schools look for diversity. Whatever you did before sets you apart in the medical school application process Think about the skills you learned from your prior career that you can transfer to medicine Pull everything together in a personal statement Links and Other Resources: University of Maryland Science in the Evening Program AAMC Postbac program list Thompson Advising Session 6 - Russell Session 8 - Torray Session 11 - Kate (56-year-old MS3) If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
44 min
May 21, 2013
26: 6 Myths of Osteopathic Medical School - Interview
Session 26 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Patrick and Jonathan, both 3rd year DO medical students at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine. They wrote A Brief Guide to Osteopathic Medicine - For Students, By Students, which is published on AACOM. They wrote this guide to provide valuable information about osteopathic medicine, about what it is, and the different myths of osteopathic medicine that are currently circulating around, which they will discuss on the show today. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Jonathan and Patrick: Jonathan's path to medicine: Applying to both MD and DO schools Choosing the schools to apply to based on location and price Patrick's path to medicine: Majoring in microbiology Applying to both MD and DO schools Doing a dual degree in MD/MPH Reactions among friends and families about going to osteopathic medical school: Jonathan's family recommending he go to medical school overseas or wait a year Patrick's family was supportive Reasons for writing the guide: To be a tangible, accessible, user-friendly resource to educate people about what DO is and osteopathic medical school in general after seeing the gap they've experienced Resources they used to help them with the application: Patrick getting help from his sister (already in medical school) Friends SDN forums Premedical fraternities Their experience with SDN: Getting into the forums related to the medical field A diversity that its greatest strength becomes its greatest weakness Coming with a lot of misinformation, rumors, and myths especially about the DO profession A lot of putting down and animosity because of the anonymity (people hiding behind their nicknames) The negative mentality about DO schools: The DO schools as second choice What makes the DO different from MD schools: OMT (Osteopathic Manipulative Therapy) Philosophical distinction *But there is an overlap between MD and DO The 6 Myths of Osteopathic Medicine: DOs are not real doctors. DOs have limited practice rights. Osteopathic medicine is a drugless form of medicine. DOs are similar to chiropractors. DOs are just doctors who couldn’t get into MD schools. “Osteopaths” are the same thing as “osteopathic physicians.” Having a DO degree in the first place? A push to change the degree name in 2010 to MD/DO Ryan's opinion is for DO sticking to primary care specialty while Patrick respectfully disagreeing with it Jonathan says compartmentalizing each aspect of medicine id difficult because it's necessary to integrate everything Being an MD wanting to learn OMM: Schools like Harvard have integrated medicine course that teaches OMM to MDs OMM is not meant to be the best kept secret of medicine Merging MD and DO residency programs for dual accreditation: All residency programs being held to the same standard Some pieces of advice for premed students: Just by adding a little force here and there, keeping certain parts of the body in certain position, you can actually change someone's physiology, pain, range of motion, and local functioning. That's how powerful the body's self-healing capability is. One of the tenets of osteopathic philosophy is that the body heals itself. Education is key. Make an informed decision for yourself. Links and Other Resources: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine California of Family Practitioners Brief Guide to Osteopathic Medicine Student Doctor Network Forums ATSU KCOM Interview Name Change Push of DO to MD, DO Harvard Medical School OMT Course - As of 2016-03-25 - It doesn't look like this course is offered Patrick also gave us a list of other OMT courses: Training Opportunities in Physical Medicine Michigan State University manual medicine courses http://com.msu.edu/CME/ If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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51 min
May 14, 2013
25: 5 Keys to a Successful Internship after Med School
Session 25 In today's episode, Ryan and Allison talk about the 5 keys to successful internship after med school and remember their experiences being interns. A Johns Hopkins study illustrated that residents only spend about 12% of their time with patients which is a pretty crazy thing considering you're going to be in the hospital for 16 hours a day as intern and only 1.92 hours spent with patients while the rest of that time is spent digging through charts, sitting in front of the computer entering notes, and looking through labs, EMRs, etc. And that's a saddening fact. Through the episode today, Ryan and Allison hope to help you become more efficient and hopefully spend more than 12% of your time with patients. 5 Keys to a Successful Internship after Medical School: Being organized. Have a system to stay efficient (If you already have a system as a 3rd or 4th medical student, stick to it if it worked for you) Have a patient list and keep it at all times (Here's a sample patient list) Write notes about additional things to do Be updated as you sign in and sign out Don't rely on your memory. Write everything down. Prioritize what you need to do. Have a separate page devoted to admissions Teamwork Learn to be a good team player as you're a part of the team. Be aware of the different key roles of people in your team and establish rapport with them Knowing when to call somebody Figure out a plan versus calling your senior resident Coming up with your own plan allows you to start the wheels turning and have a plan in motion to help build your own confidence Don't just call your senior resident. Think of a plan without doing it yet and call your senior resident for feedback Knowing your patient when you call a consult Know the patient before you call the consult. Have a "consult question" in mind when calling Provide some information about the patient to a consult Don't be afraid to ask for feedback Taking care of yourself Take whatever system you have for you to decompress (exercise, yoga, talking to your significant other, listening to music, etc.), whatever it is, know when to take a break Don't keep it all in. Have a solid support structure. Help your family and friends understand if you don't have time to be with them Other important things to remember: Learn how to dictate to save you time when writing your notes. Do your discharge notes right when the patient is discharged so you don't forget anything. Don't write orders before you see a patient. Don't sign out follow-up labs or procedures for a sick patient. Blog Spotlight Dr. Vineet Aurora blogs at futuredocsblog.com, and is on Twitter. She is the Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency and Assistant Dean of Scholarship & Discovery at the Pritzker School of Medicine for the University of Chicago. Dr. Aurora was featured on Session 38 talking about writing personal statements. She recently had a great post on KevinMD which you can check out about residency training and how it needs to change. Links and Other Resources: Here is a sample patient list that we put together. Johns Hopkins Study - 12% of Intern Time Spent at the Bedside ACGME Duty Hour Regulations If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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38 min
May 8, 2013
24: Interview with Bow Tie Ben, 4th Year Med Student
Session 24 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Ben Azevedo, otherwise known as Bow Tie Ben, where he explains why he has such a nickname. Ben is a 4th year medical student who runs a bow tie business, New Orleans Bow Ties, a perfect example of what this show has been preaching about that you need to give yourself a break outside of medical school. Today, he shares with us his path to medical school and how his business has helped him during medical school. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Bow Tie Ben: Ben's path to medical school: Starting the premed path a little late Taking the MCAT after graduating from UC Berkeley Spending a year of service at a children's hospital in Cambodia Ben's application process: Writing his personal statement on his Palm Pilot, sitting at McDonald's in Bali His years between college and med school were dedicated to applying to med school Choosing the medical schools to apply to: Location (interesting culture and need for service) Applying to a med school in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina Being in medical school feeling all fired up How the Bow Tie Ben was conceived: Coming to New Orleans and seeing "real" bow ties Diving into the city's culture and pursuing his love for art Feeling the need for something creative to work on Making a bow tie out of a Thai silk using his mom's sewing machine How the arts has helped him get through medical school: Activating the right side of his brain Putting things in perspective to pull himself out of studying and seeing a brighter side of life Meeting different kinds of people he wouldn't have otherwise met The future of his business: Knowing things will change once he starts residency Figuring out what he's going to do with it Some pieces of advice for premed students: Use that energy. Every student has it. It can take you a long way. Links and Other Resources: New Orleans Bow Ties Ben on Twitter @BenAzevedo and @NOLABowTies New Orleans Bow Ties on Instagram New Orleans Bow Ties on Twitter New Orleans Bow Ties on Facebook Ben's Tumblr Page Tulane University School of Medicine If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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30 min
April 27, 2013
23: Interview with Dr. Polites of MedPrep at Wash. U.
Session 23 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Greg Polites, a physician, an educator, and a mentor at Washington University in St. Louis where he teaches the MedPrep program. Greg is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Wash.U and he is also on the admissions committee as well as the course master for the Practice of Medicine course for 1st and 3rd year medical students there. Today, they discuss topics covering starting undergrad on the right foot, overextending yourself, volunteering, and some pieces of advice related to doing extracurricular activities. He also shares about the MedPrep program that prepares undergrad students for medical school and beyond. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Greg: About MedPrep Seeing the void that needed to be met to give an idea of what medicine is all about A course that lays out the entire education process from the first day of college to the day of becoming a physician Foundational lectures covering topics like the different stressors in medicine, patient care management, medical ethics & dilemmas, and other medical issues An overview of the timeline relating to the curriculum, matching process, residency training, and becoming a board-certified physician Q&A sessions with resident physicians in multiple specialties and Wash. U medical students Greg's advice to Freshmen or Sophomore students in other schools that do not have MedPrep: Having a plan Have a plan as early as possible. Sit down and have a general idea of how you're going to use the next 3 1/2 years and your summers early. Extracurricular activities Don't get overextended early on. Start up slow and set a foundation for success. Come to college and be a bookworm. Don't get too involved in more than one serious extracurricular activity at the same time. Start the process with momentum and ease into college. Resources Make use of the university-provided tutors. Get to know your professors. Interact with your advisors early on since they will most likely be writing your letters of recommendation during the application process. Course correction Overextending and having bad grades: What do you do? Try to improve with each successive semester Move forward and do well in higher level courses in the same discipline Don't take a class over again if you got a C in it unless you don't have foundational knowledge to move onto the next course Grade replacements AMCAS (for allopathic/MD granting schools) application having no grade replacement AACOMAS (for osteopathic/DO schools) applications having grade replacement which allows more leniency Other things to consider: Having an understanding of each component of the application Making your academics a priority above all else Exploring and asking yourself why medicine through shadowing Doing volunteering, shadowing, or research not for checking off the boxes for your application but to figure out if medicine is something that you really like Research as not a mandatory thing for your application Doing something you're passionate about and that you enjoy Choosing what undergrad school to go to: Don't look at it in terms of the name of the school but in terms of the preparation Misconceptions of MedPrep students about medicine they find out during the course: Medicine as all-consuming Finding a specialty that works with your lifestyle Having a realistic expectation of the average lifestyle for a certain specialty The importance of applying early: Not applying early as one of the most common mistakes students make on their application Most schools accept applicants on a rolling basis Holding off delays the whole process and it becomes more competitive Make sure to work on your personal statement Links and Other Resources: Interview with KCOM AACOMAS AMCAS Medical School Timeline MedPrep at WashU Doctors Diaries If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests that you can take. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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40 min
April 18, 2013
22: Interview with MSIV and MD2B Publisher Allison
Session 22 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Allison Greco, creator of the blog MD2B. Allison is graduating from Jefferson Medical College and will start her Internal Medicine residency at Jefferson in July. She talks about her path to medical school, how she chose her undergraduate school, and its impact on building relationships in undergrad leading her to Jefferson. They also cover the match process experience and some good pieces of advice in store for you. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Allison: Considerations for choosing her undergrad school: Location Great premed program Getting scholarship The best premed program is whatever school that you personally can fit in the best with. What makes a great premed program: Building great relationships with advisors and professors Small class size Choosing which medical school to go to: Small school vs. Jefferson Jefferson offering a greater diversity of patients and great learning environment Allison's medical school life: Initially wanting to do primary care and having a changed perspective The importance of keeping an open mind Her aha! moment during her rural family medicine rotation Realizing she wanted a hospital setting Required inpatient and outpatient sub-internship Sub-internship serving as your job interview for residency programs) Allison applied for internal medicine Going through the dreaded MATCH process: Considerations for choosing where to apply: Location Getting help from her sub-specialty advisor Applying to 18 programs and ending up with 9 interviews How residency application interview is different from the med school interview A first come, first serve process More laidback They want you as much as you want them Fun experience - inviting you to dinners Considerations for ranking her schools: Reputable program that allows her to do fellowship Opportunities to rotate in different sub-specialties Diversity of patient population Urban setting with exposure to tertiary care Opportunities for writing and blogging The actual matching day experience: Advisors distributing the letter Letting you read it however you want it Allison's online presence: Starting her blog out of her frustration with all the push-back she saw on Twitter against medical students blogging Morphing into her medical school experiences to help other people going through the same thing Links and Other Resources: Allison's blog md2bgrecoa3.com Connect with Allison on Twitter @grecoa3 If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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33 min
April 14, 2013
21: Medical School Financial Planning Expert Interview
Session 21 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Tony Sozzo, the Director of Student Financial Planning at New York Medical College (NYMC). That's where Ryan went to medical school and he attributes Tony to being a valuable asset to him and everyone helping students realize that they have more control over this than they realize. With Tony's great financial planning, NYMC has a default rate of only 0.8%. Listen is as they discuss the value of financial planning in setting you up for the future. They also cover the cost of going to medical school, the effect of your credit score and history, financing, applying for financial aid, budget creation in medical school, and a whole lot more! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Tony: Tony is doing financial seminar within 10 days or 2 weeks Tony's advice to students coming into medical school: You have options. Consider yourself as a consumer Take ownership and get involved right from the start Borrow wisely and only borrow what you need. Send money back if you don't need it. Keep your credit card debt as the lowest possible. The 120-day rule: Sending the borrowed money back within the first four months of any semester This will lower the principal balance of the loan taken out of that semester Any new interest accrued at the graduate school level is now lowered How do you give the money back? Find out which servicer the government assigned you to Go to their website and set up a free account Put in your routing number for your checking/savings account Every time you have extra money, go in and send it right back as back to the government Taking control of credit card debt Sacrifice a little bit now for the greater gain later on down the road Think about the other people in your life Try to make your money work within your spending plan What your budget or spending plan covers: Tuition and direct cost Indirect expenses: Food Housing Books & supplies Transportation Miscellaneous expenses What if you have family? The financial aid process is in place for the students but they can have some ways to add into the budget Some institutions recognize the cost of daycare or nanny care based on documentation into the budget Health insurance covering children Advice to stellar students who think of not going to medical school because of the cost: There are many different ways to deal with debt that won't choke you. You have so many options available to you for the kind of doctor you want to be that will be open to you. The effect of credit score and bankruptcy history on financial aid application: Looking at the last three months of your life if you've been good If you have a recent problem, go for a cosigner that has a good credit history If on your second year you're good and you apply, you get the loan on your own. Co-signing means they're responsible if you default later on down the road Learn about your credit scores to see the mistakes and fix them Credit score of over 620 is what they're looking for Have a good picture of your financial life. Go to www.annualcreditreport.com and get the three major credit reporting agencies' reports for free. Some pieces of advice for premed students: Don't go to medical school if you're doing it for the wrong reasons. Links and Other Resources: www.annualcreditreport.com If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
April 9, 2013
20: National Health Service Corps Scholarship Info
Session 20  In today's episode, Ryan talks with the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Scholarship Program. Back in session 18, the podcast covered the Air Force HPSP Program. Both of which are scholarships that you can apply to so you can get medical school paid for where you get a monthly stipend and cost through medical school will be covered. Here are the highlights of the conversation: About the NHSC Scholarship Program: Authorized in 1974 to address the shortage of primary care physicians, especially in rural America In the 80's, NHSC included the loan repayment program Accepting the scholarship doesn't make you commit to live in a rural area; instead, NHSC sites are found throughout the country where there are underserved populations To increase access to care by supporting primary care providers as they practice in underserved areas Provides for students pursuing a degree in the following health professions: Internal Medicine Family Medicine Psychiatry Pediatrics OB/GYN Dentistry Certified nurse midwives Nurse practitioners Physicians assistants What the scholarship covers: Full tuition and fees (non-taxable) Other reasonable costs (books, microscope, instruments, etc.) Monthly stipend (taxable) Years of scholarship available: 1 year minimum 4 years maximum Required years of commitment: 2 years minimum to practice at the NHSC site located in a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) Choosing another specialty not included in the program: If you switch from IM to surgery for example, you have to give back all the money given to you plus penalties on top of that Defining the Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA): Using data sets for determining whether an area (typically a county) has a shortage of healthcare providers based on birth rate, morbidity, mortality, socio-economics, what it takes for an average person to drive to a healthcare facility, insurance, etc. Based on a scoring system of 0 to 26 with 26 indicating the highest needs Outpatient setting for the most part HPSA Scoring: Re-scoring every 3 years Scholars in their last year training enter into a placement cycle where they are given one-on-one support Some sites are not approved but are approvable Sites are not limited to rural areas but located everywhere (rural, urban, frontiers, reservations, etc.) Characteristics of HPSA populations: On Medicare/ Medicaid No insurance Workforce but no access to healthcare How competitive is the scholarship program? They receive thousands of applications with over 200 awards in the past 2 years What makes you a good candidate for the program? Being able to demonstrate that you can complete the program Demonstrated commitment to practicing in underserved areas Volunteering experiences and healthcare missions Priority is given to students with economic and social disadvantaged backgrounds Which medical schools you can go to: Fully accredited program in the US Requirements for the application process: Completed online application Two letters of recommendation (Academic and Non-academic) Documentation (if you are from a disadvantaged background) Transcript CV 3 Essays Current tuition and fees of the school they're planning to attend Robust initiative to help scholars prepare for practice: Webinars Podcasts Mentor program Requirements for loan repayment option: Practicing at an NHSC approved site Full-time or half-time Priority funding goes to providers practicing in higher needs areas Participant is able to come in every year for a one-year contract with caps or limits on the money Links and Other Resources: Session 018: Air Force HPSP Scholarship Info Interview NHSC Site NHSC Application Start Health Professional Shortage Area Search NHSC Application and Program Guidance NHSC Criteria for Disadvantaged Background NHSC on Twitter If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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41 min
March 30, 2013
19: Interview with a Medical School Admissions Expert
Session 19   In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Norma Wagoner. With almost 30 years of experience in the admissions process, she has served as the Dean of Admissions for multiple medical schools such as Rush University, University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine and the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Today, she shares a ton of valuable information about with the interview process, what medical schools are looking for on an application to get an interview, and what the admissions committee is looking for during the interview process. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dr. Wagoner: Norma's path to medicine: Graduating with a PhD from WashU in Anatomy Taking her first job at Rush Medical College in Chicago teaching anatomy Becoming Dean of Admissions after one year out of graduate school Recruited to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine serving for 10 years Becoming the National Chair of Student Affairs Being on the National Board of Medical Examiners She wrote the electronic residency application process Becoming Dean of Students at the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine for 14 years (also doing admissions) Becoming Dean of Admissions at University of Colorado School of Medicine What the admissions committees are looking for in the application: Meeting the criteria and competencies the school is looking for Understanding the mission of the institution Good critical thinking skills Excellence in quantitative reasoning Strong scientific inquiry (especially if the school has a big research component) Communication skills Residency competencies Knowledge of themselves and others Cultural competence Teamwork and reliability Ethical responsibilities Ability to cope well and adapt "Demystifying the process" at the University of Colorado School of Medicine: Posting all the criteria they used online for applicants to see Handing out the interview form to applicants as she seeks to "demystify" the process. Making students as comfortable as they can be to allow them to do their best The more information given out, the more comfortable students feel Predictors of Success: Undergrad GPA and MCAT - Gives an indication of how well a student might do in the first two years of medical school and on your Step 1 score Knowledge and professionalism in the third year The applicant pool: In 2012, there were 45, 266 applicants A student submits an average of 14 applications This means medicals schools wade through well over half a million applications Under 20,000 people are matriculating to medical school Roughly only half will be interviewed Ratio of 2.3 applications to each position About 54 medical schools get between 5,000 and 15,000 applications Narrowing the group of applications: Initial weight goes to grades and MCAT being the only standard measure across the board for all applicants Inviting the top students first and working the way down the process Tremendous grade inflation as an issue (for GPA) How to prepare for the interview process: Standard interview Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI) - 15 school in the US are now participating Ask yourself why you applied to the school What are your strongest attributes that you would do well as a student there? Go the school's website and read all materials Make up questions you want to ask to the interviewer Look at the time of the interview, where to go, where to park, etc. Build a little portfolio on each of the schools you're applying to Identify whether it's an open or closed interview (blind or partially blind) Review your application, goals, and experiences Note: Be careful when you wrote in your application that you speak fluent Spanish (when you don't), they might conduct the entire interview in Spanish *The University of Colorado uses partially blind interview to focus on their criteria, looking at the student's passions and goals, and avoid bias by grades and MCAT scores that pre-directs them to certain questions confirming why they should take the students More on the MMI: Not about connecting with the interviewer but how the applicant responds to a series of standardized situations Looking for communication, social interaction, compassion, problem-solving and teamwork Strengths, weaknesses, and some issues around it Students need to practice flexibility in facing new situations with confidence Discussing poor grades in a personal statement: Don't mention poor grades in a personal statement (unless there are circumstances that enabled growth or change) What the interviewer looks for: Consistency of response Depth of knowledge How reality has tested them Passion for medicine Criteria of the school Eye contact Genuineness and honesty More great topics covered: Questions you can ask during the interview What you should wear (no hot pink!) Should you wear a beard? The most common mistakes interviewees do wrong The value of mock interviews Links and Other Resources: Join Ryan on Skype and learn the skills to ace your interview day! Check out http://medicalschoolhq.net/mockinterviews for more info. Multiple Mini-interview (MMI) Stanford Article about the MMI McGill Fact Sheet about the MMI If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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52 min
March 26, 2013
18: Air Force HPSP Scholarship Info Interview
Session 18 In today's episode, Ryan talks with TSgt Stephanie Satinsky to discuss about the Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP). Stephanie is the Air Force HPSP recruiter for the New England area. Ryan could have gone through this topic by himself but he wanted to bring in someone who can discuss the program as it is at the present moment. Today, she talks about what the HPSP is all aobut, what the Air Force is looking for during the application process, the minimum scores involved, the maximum age, money involved, and everything in between. And by the way, know that the three services - Air Force, Army, and Navy - all offer scholarship under the same Department of Defense (DOD) guidance with some variations on what each service offers for the scholarship.  If you are interested in the scholarship, or even just starting to gather some information, please take a listen. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Stephanie: What is HPSP? Two-fold benefits: To the Air Force - growing their own physicians and forecast their healthcare network To medical students - Relieves them of the financial burden of medical school What the scholarship covers: Tuition Monthly stipend Books and fees Insurance Obligations: 4 year scholarship = 4 years of active duty after residency 2-year or 3-year scholarship = 3 years of active duty after residency 1-year scholarship not offered Internship year: General Medical Officer (GMO) No residency 1-year internship = 4 years of active duty Paying back your time once you start working Going beyond normal residency length: Internship year + additional four years (total of 5 years) Incurring a year for year obligation Ex. 7-year residency = additional 2 years obligation on the end of your contract The application process: 350-450 scholarships a year (Air Force) Rolling admissions process Benefits of the scholarship program: Signing bonus ($20,000) for a 4-year scholarship When to apply: Apply early but not so early that you still don't have your MCAT score yet and running the risk of your physical exams getting expired It takes 3 months to get a physical exam completed and cleared Health restrictions: Google 48-123. Go to chapter 5 and see all the restrictions. Once you take and accept the scholarship: Being commissioned as 2nd Lt. right away. What's next? Commissioned Officers Training (COT) Commissioned Officers Training (COT) A 45-day basic training in a leadership school (Ryan calls it bootcamp with maids) An opportunity to introduce yourself to the Air Force Gaining a better understanding what you're wearing the uniform for and what you're doing this for Age requirement: Prior to 35th birthday (although they can sign a waiver) Finishing medical school by 39 years old Minimum grade requirements: Minimum GPA - 3.0 Minimum MCAT - 22 Residency matching: Applying to military matching before the civilian MD/DO matches and applying concurrently as well Once accepted into a military facility, you need to pull out of the civilian match Applying for 1-2 specialties 80-85% of people will match (Specialty and location) 15% who don't match do internship year and reapply on the match Reapplying the 2nd time and not matching results to a GMO tour (flight surgeon) Some pieces of advice for premed students: Don't do it for the money. At the end of the day, if you're not interested in being a member of the Air Force, you're going to be unhappy. It might not be for everyone, but you won't know until you start looking into it and ask questions. This could open up a whole different career for you as you're touching lives not only in the US but around the world. Links and Other Resources: Listen to Ryan on the Lost in PreMed Podcast as he talks a little about this topic Health Restrictions on Chapter 5 of 48-123 Medicine and the Military Air Force HPSP Information Air Force Commissioned Officer Training Medical Requirements - Air Force Instruction 48-123 (Search for "5.3. Standards") If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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33 min
March 16, 2013
17: Step Up Your MCAT Prep with The Princeton Review
Session 17 In this episode, Ryan talks with Chris Manual, a senior lead instructor with The Princeton Review where he has been teaching for 11 years. Even if you're taking Kaplan or other MCAT prep course, this session is still worth listening to as Chris shares with us some key things you need to know about taking the MCAT, the right mindset in taking it, some possible options they offer, ways to prepare for the MCAT, the biggest mistakes student make in preparing for the MCAT and some more tips to help you prepare well for the MCAT. He goes on to give some great premed advice on what to major in to help you get the best GPA, volunteering, and writing your personal statement. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Chris: The normal in-person classroom setting: Having individual teachers per subject Getting interaction from other students ICC (In Class Companion) going over MCAT topics covered in class 42 classes to 2 1/2 hours each Chris' experience in taking the MCAT: Scoring 99.9% Taking the MCAT during the "paper and pencil" days Not understanding physics very well but having really good test-taking skills Missing only 6 questions on his MCAT (5 of them are physics questions) What the MCAT tests you for: A "balancing act" between content and test taking skills The material itself is not hard but it's the way the questions are being asked that make them difficult How Princeton Review pick their teachers: Non-academic interview/presentation Subject-specific content test 20-hour training (presenting live classroom material) Interactive methodology using the Socratic method Princeton Review's different class options: Online - MCAT Live Online (webinar-type) with office hours In-person Private tutoring Summer Immersion Program (San Diego and Austin classes) The biggest mistakes students make in their MCAT prep: Underestimating the psychology of test-taking Memorizing everything and not understanding Not referencing the passages More MCAT prep tips from Chris: Set a baseline of memorizing certain facts that you can build upon. Pair up with someone to bounce ideas off with. How is Princeton Review preparing for the MCAT 2015: Finding out what's exactly on the MCAT Revamping all their materials Retraining all of their current teachers and staff Understanding the history of MCAT: Prior to 1991 MCAT is tested on memorization Students from foreign countries scoring better than US students Resulting to doctor shortage Paper and pencil model to computer-based test Based on critical thinking Giving a higher correlation to Step 1 MCAT 2015 To get rid of score discrepancy between men and women To get a higher correlation between MCAT, Step 1, and academic performance Helping medical schools to find the best candidates Must-have MCAT prep tips for premed students: Do not be a science major unless you truly love science. (Major in something you truly love to get a higher GPA) Volunteer somewhere consistently throughout your academic career. When writing your personal statement, think of it as a touching off-point for what you want to discuss during interview. Links and Other Resources: The Princeton Review Summer Immersion Program MCAT 2015 The Princeton Review MCAT Prep - Full Resources If you want some Kaplan MCAT Prep info, check that out here If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
38 min
March 8, 2013
16: Interview with Mount Sinai - All About FlexMed
Session 16 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. David Muller, the Dean for Medical Education at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (MSSM) about FlexMed, a program that allows you to apply to medical school as early as high school senior or undergrad freshmen or sophomore as well as skip most of the traditional premed requirements like the MCAT, organic chemistry, biochemistry, or physics. FlexMed is basically an upgrade of what was previously called HuMed (Humanities in Medicine). Today, David discusses all you need to know about FlexMed including how you can prepare yourself to become a competitive applicant to the FlexMed program in the future. Here are the highlights of the conversation with David: What is FlexMed? An alternative path to medical school for students that don't want to sacrifice broad and deep college experience or don't want to go through the "detrimental" environment in the premed world Students don't have to take the traditional science requirements and instead explore their passions Additional semester in the realm of health policy, public health, global health, bioethics, and biostats The number of available seats for the program has increased from 1/4 of a class to 1/2 of a class The structure of US medical schools vs. medical schools in Europe Students having limited exposure to science: Getting the bearings after the first semester and on par with their peers FlexMed students are given a 6-week course to expose them to biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics to avoid "shell shock" FlexMed students vs. "regular" students 2010 published HuMed article showing no statistical difference between success Non significant trend towards psychiatry and primary care residencies Students coming in without hard sciences background don't have any significant withdrawal from medical school The ideal applicants for the FlexMed program: Great degree of commitment to the field The ability to articulate and demonstrate what they're going to do with their education Innovative and creative Ambitious Avoiding burnout and making students more happy: Creating a system that won't make people burned out before going to medical school, students will be less likely to undergo burnout These students can be the drivers of a more dramatic change Links and Other Resources: FlexMed 2010 Published HuMed Article Some criticism of the program Wall Street Journal Article If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
34 min
March 6, 2013
15: Interview with ATSU KCOM Admissions Office
Session 15 In this episode, Ryan speaks with David Koenecke, the Assistant Vice President of Admissions at A.T. Still University's Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCOM). KCOM is the first osteopathic medical school in the world and today, David shares with us how the institution is keeping up with the changes in technology. Listen in as David also shares some great advice on personal statements, application timing, shadowing, and more. Here are the highlights of the conversation with David: A brief history of KCOM: A.T. Still moved to Kirksville in the mid 1800's He developed osteopathic medicine in the country Started osteopathic practice in 1874 First school built in 1892 named American School of Osteopathy Now grown into A.T. Still University with campuses in Kirksville and Arizona (Separate applications for Kirksville and Arizona) How KCOM is keeping up with the changing technology: More clinical experiences in the first two years More hands-on group learning types of scenario iPad initiative for students on a trial basis Keeping up with it in the medical technology realm Types of students KCOM is looking for: A heart to practice medicine Dedicated hard work and commitment Academic acceleration Having the desire and compassion to serve people especially the underserved populations GPA and MCAT as good starting parameters Extracurricular activities (patient contact, shadowing, volunteering, community work) which are made as part of their lifestyle Shadowing experience: Not a requirement at KCOM but understanding what osteopathy is and what they're getting into (through research) Numbers at KCOM: GPA Average - 3-4 MCAT - 27 172 students/year 450-500 interviews/year Around 4,000 applications MD vs. DO schools: The same curriculum Grade replacement in DO schools Every school as a personality fit Do's and Don'ts in writing personal statements: Aha! moment that influenced you Honest and heartfelt - always coming from the heart Who you are and what you want to do with that Going through some level of adversity and coming out of it in a positive fashion Don't copy and paste from other websites and use your own words Don't use quotes because they're somebody else's thoughts Don't quote from Harry Potter movies The importance of early application: The admissions committee being more open-minded and very "hungry" at the beginning of the application cycle The admissions committee becoming even more picky at the end of the cycle Some pieces of advice for high school students: Make sure it's what you want to do by getting involved in many healthcare opportunities such as volunteering. The rewards are just as great as your commitment in medicine. But the road going there is very bumpy so make sure it's what you want to do and you know exactly how to do it. Links and Other Resources: Watch this interview on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUamXMiqobo Session 05: Interview with OldPreMeds Publisher Richard Levy OldPreMeds 2013 National Conference ATSU KCOM What is Osteopathic Medicine? ATSU-SOMA iPad Program increases scores 23% Albert Einstein College of Medicine article about shadowing Unified Accreditation Process for Residencies If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
35 min
February 27, 2013
14: Interview with TheBiopsy.com Publisher Roheet
Session 14 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Roheet from TheBiopsy.com where he shares with us his premed path. Roheet is currently in a gap year not because he initially chose to, but because he had to reapply to medical school for having not been accepted the first time, although reapplying is not something unusual and which, in fact, was something that Ryan had to go through as well. Listen in to find out why exactly did he not get into medical school the first time (not even getting a single interview even when he scored well in his GPA and MCAT) as well as learn how Roheet bolstered his medical re-application that landed him 12 interviews. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Roheet: Roheet's current path to becoming a physician: Graduated from University of California San Diego with a bioengineering degree Now on his gap year (having to reapply) and waiting to hear back from medical schools he applied to Going through college without plans to get into medical school but only having a bioengineering mindset Started volunteering at a hospital halfway through college (to get a better understanding of how bioengineering can augment clinical practice) Roheet's aha! moment to pursue medicine: His first patient encounter! Resources he tapped into to figure out his next steps: Internal reflection Parents Academic counselor Getting shadowing experience: Getting help from his premed student-friend Reaching out to his old primary care physician (not in an academic setting so there was more room for one-on-one time) - this is a tactic which was also discussed in Session 12 The power of building relationships GPA and MCAT scores: Taking a Kaplan course and getting a 33 on the MCAT Cumulative GPA: 3.681 Competitive scores... why didn't he get into medical school the first time? Not getting any single interview Roheet applied really late! Medical schools admit applicants based on rolling admissions - they see the first batch of interviews and decide right then and there if they should accept them or not. The later you wait to apply, the fewer spots available No shadowing experience as another reason for not getting in "It's like a game of musical chairs. As you go later in the game, there are less chairs to sit on." Reaching out to schools to get feedback on his application: Some schools do not give feedback, other schools would offer in-person meeting to get feedback. More about TheBiopsy.com: Started blogging at January 2012 (halfway through his first application cycle) Initially created as his personal learning platform Posts are specifically about medical news and his thoughts Ways to bolster his second application: Shadowing Taking free online classes and courses through Coursera (from major universities and you get credit for it too) Making himself busy by helping his father's business Volunteering (Habitat for Humanity, hospitals) Roheet's considerations in which medical school to apply to: Stats where he can be competitive - MSAR Location Seeing himself in that school in four years Specialties he's interested in How a social media presence can help you in your application: Blog as a digital portfolio The upsides of blogging that relates to your application Keep it professional. Keep it up to date. Keep it relevant. Some pieces of advice for premed students: See the technological wave in the medical arena as a challenge towards better patient care or as an opportunity to innovate. Believe in yourself. Medicine is a field wherein you'll be tested all the time in all aspects. Your resolve will be tested. If you don't have that faith in yourself and faith in your dream, you're not going to be able to make it. Links and Other Resources: During his gap year, Roheet started his not-for-profit org in his hometown that promotes community dialogue through debates on topics of national importance. Check out greatcvdebate.wix.com Check out Roheet's blog TheBiopsy.com or connect with him on Twitter @thebiopsy Dr. Bryan Vartabedian on Twitter @Doctor_v MSAR Coursera If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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40 min
February 20, 2013
13: Interview with Dean of UCF College of Medicine
Session 13 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Deborah German, the Dean of The University of Central Florida College of Medicine (UCF COM). UCF COM was the first, built from the ground up, allopathic medical school in the US in almost 30 years. Before we dive into the discussion, the show begins with a question we got in the email forum from Laura, a 3rd-year biomedical PhD student, where she asked about how to shadow on weekends if your schedule is too full during the week. Ryan answers this by saying that while not ideal, there are opportunities on weekends. Hospitals are open 24/7 so you can probably shadow in a hospital ER if they let you. It's a matter of reaching out to your local hospital. Also look around for doctor's offices that may be open on weekends in your area as well as some walk-in clinics which fill in where other offices are closed. Back to the interview, Ryan talks with Dr. German where they discuss about Lake Nona Medical City, the types of students UCF is looking for, and having that passion to really do what you love to do which Dr. German has reiterated for a number of times. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dr. German: Types of students UCF looks for: Strive for excellence Heart for medicine Pioneering entrepreneurial spirit Spirit of inquiry and curiosity about medicine Leadership Professionalism - Willing to put themselves aside for the needs of another More about Lake Nona Medical City: 7,000 acres of land (700 of which becomes the new medical city) Adjacent to the Orlando International Airport Approved in 2006, the medical school serves as an anchor along with other partners like: Nemours Children’s Hospital Veterans Affairs Medical Center (second largest VA hospital) Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute University of Florida Academic and Research Center University of Central Florida Health Sciences Campus UCF's current progress: UCF did better than half of the medical schools across the country on USMLE Students doing international trips New online medical journal Cureus UCF won the global competition for student research for medical students, residents, and graduate students Full accreditation https://today.ucf.edu/ucf-college-of-medicine-achieves-full-accreditation/ Curriculum at UCF: Integrated curriculum Clinical work starts in the first year Basic and clinical science throughout all 4 years Research required of every student (First two years) Use of technology to assist the education for students (simulation, virtual patients, standardized patients, live patient interaction, assessment system) UCF Admissions: Admitting 120 in the Fall Reasons for the rise of new medical schools: To address healthcare nationally Scarcity of physicians Economic driver for communities 3 Categories of dreamers that lay the foundation of UCF: Mother Teresa - Taking care of people Nobel Prize Winners - Curing cancer, eliminating obesity, or eradicating infectious diseases Sergeants General - Global health, healthcare reform, and health disparities Dr. German's advice to those struggling with poor grades: You have to show that you're committqed and it has to come across in your grades in your last couple of years. Otherwise, take a Master's degree if you have to to really show that you're committed to it. Some pieces of advice for high school seniors and premed students: If you love it, give it everything you have. If you can't, then think about that. Links and Other Resources: Call in and leave a question like Laura did at 617-410-6747 so we can play it here on the podcast and share it with everyone. This is not a competition. We're all in this together! University of Central Florida College of Medicine Lake Nona Medical City Cureus Medical Journal PDF showing 8.9% of 3.8+GPA and 39+ MCAT applicants DO NOT get into Medical School 10,000 people are turning 65 EVERY DAY! If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests that you can take. Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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35 min
February 8, 2013
12: Shadowing Secrets for Every Premed and Beyond
Session 12 In this episode, Ryan and Allison talk all about shadowing, which is a pretty common question among many premed students - where to shadow, what shadowing is, what expectations are there, and more! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan and Allison: What is shadowing? Observing a physician in the clinic, hospital, O.R. or wherever the physician works, going through a typical day, giving you first hand knowledge to see what life is really like as a physician. Ryan best describes it as being "a fly on the wall; while Allison thinks your shadowing experience can turn into something so much more than you ever thought imaginable that can make a difference over your career Reasons for shadowing: To gain first hand, tangible knowledge of what it's like to practice as a physician Gives you a sense of what the perks are of being a physician as well as the rewards and challenges (You also get to see how much paperwork is involved in your day-to-day life) Building relationships and a strong network of people you can rely on and use later (think letters of recommendation) To strengthen your medical school application in a way that you get to demonstrate your work ethic such that the person will recommend you for medical school Getting a unique one-on-one opportunity to learn actively from a physician To help out the team while you're there and they can help you To see if you actually really like to become a physician To get exposed to different specialties and figure out what you might be interested in Shadowing Basics: Where and how to start Talk to your family, friends, teachers who know physicians or are physicians themselves Your own primary care physician Don't be afraid to reach out a physician and make a phone call or send an email. Call a hospital (volunteering office) or private practice and say that you want to shadow somebody at the hospital so they could set you up to somebody. Why you want to shadow: Be honest about why you want to shadow and why they would be a good person to work with and shadow. Set your goals and expectations. Clarify for yourself and the physician why you are shadowing (letter of recommendation or are you thinking of going there for residency) If you're doing it for a letter of recommendation: Set aside enough time to build that relationship Ryan shadowed 2-3 times a week for several months and he got a killer letter of recommendation. As with Allison's case, she shadowed a cardiologist for 3 summers for several months over each summer. In medical school, she shadowed a neurologist over most of the summers Tips on your first day of shadowing: Be punctual. Be early. Show up on time for rounds or when the clinic opens. Introduce yourself to the physician, their staff, and other healthcare providers that work there Sit and look through the day Get to know the physician a little bit and share about who you are Begin by looking at the patient load for the day Be discrete and be very polite so as not to make the patients feel uncomfortable. Ask questions in between patients. Fashion basics when shadowing: No heels inside the OR Dress appropriately Ask beforehand as to where to find your scrubs Always wear closed-toed shoes Keep your nails free of polish or neutral (no bright colors) Don't wear a white coat Business casual. No need for suits. A buttoned-down shirt and a tie will do. How to make the most out of your shadowing before you leave: Take notes. Bring a pen and notebook with you and make sure to keep that with you. Turn this experience into something you can use for your application by being always open and taking on more things while you're there. Continue to be excited about what you're doing while you're there Continue to build that relationship in the future by following up and sending emails Take the time to really acknowledge the physician for taking you on Thank the physician and other people on the team or hospital Look for active opportunities to go back and work with that physician Some pieces of advice for premed students: Keep yourself open to all possibilities. Do you have a life-changing shadowing experience? Let us know below! Links and Other Resources: DoctorShadow.com - We didn't talk about it during the session, but this is a relatively new site that offers a resource to find shadowing opportunities. And it's free! If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq Tweet Allison @allison_mshq or send her an email at allison@medicalschoolhq.net.
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35 min
January 28, 2013
11: Interview with a 56-Year-Old Medical Student
Session 11 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Kate, a 56-year old 3rd year medical student at West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine as she  shares with us her path to becoming a physician. Kate was initially a bio premed major until she decided to stop and pursue a career as a nurse until changing careers to becoming a nurse midwife and doing another career change into finally becoming a physician. Kate is definitely proof that anything is possible. Anyone can get into medical school. You just need to put in the work and you'll get there. Listen in to Kate’s amazing journey! Here are the highlights of the conversation with Kate: Kate's path to becoming a physician: Decided to become a doctor when she was 10 Interest in rural family practice growing up in rural locations for the  most part of her life Initially a biology premed major until midway through college Transferred to a nursing program in her junior year Working as a nurse midwife for 13 years prior to medical school Switching from being a nurse to a nurse midwife and a teacher in nursing Deciding to go back to medical school at the age of 50 Why Kate decided to stop being premed the first time: Medical school as having a cutthroat environment Finding the length of education to be overwhelming Found interest in what the nurses are doing and wanting immediate gratification The thought of raising kids Lack of research into the whole thing when she made her decision The driving force that made her decide to get into medical school: Being involved in her local community and seeing the need for primary care Seeing physicians as a really huge instrument for change especially in the effective organization around  public health issues Thirst for knowledge and wanting to become a "change" agent Resources she tapped into initially: Kate googled "old premedical students" which led her to OldPreMeds.org Knowing what prerequisites were needed Her family physicians Taking her postbac program: Not being able to get to the classes she needed Ended up applying to two schools for a "structured" postbac program Quitting her job to do the program full time Having that fear in terms of finances Getting the finances: Applying to the National Health Service Corps each year and not getting it Applying for loan repayment program as her plan B Considerations for choosing the schools she applied to: Emphasis on rural primary care and global medical outreach Geography (closer to family) Specifically choosing osteopathic medical schools but ended up applying to 6 DO schools and 6 MD schools and getting 6 interviews The interview process: Having a collegiate footing with the interviewer being a nurse educator herself Giving her an edge as a nontraditional old premed having had some experiences The biggest obstacle that she had overcome: Talking herself out of trying Links and Other Resources: West Virginia School of Medicine National Health Service Corps OldPreMeds.org Check out oneminutemedicalschool.com for some awesome Youtube Videos AAMC list of postbac programs If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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38 min
January 27, 2013
10: Interview with Columbia Postbac Premed Program
Session 10 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Dr. Victoria Rosner, the Associate Dean of GS Coordinator of Academic Affairs at Columbia University's Postbac Premed Program where Dr. Rosner leads the premedical advising team and support of postbac premed students. Columbia University is the first and largest postbac program in the country with close to 500 students in the program altogether and focusing mostly on career changers, most of which have never taken science classes before and many of them have turned away from their successful careers in various industries but realized they had to dedicate their life to being healers. Today, they discuss things like the growing popularity of postbac programs across the country, the types of students Columbia is looking for, and the immense support the school is offering to help their students really excel in their passion. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Dr. Rosner: Where most of the postbac students come from: Going through undergrad thinking they're not going to be doctors Some want to be doctors but they think they can't A very diverse group Common characteristics of postbac students: Extremely driven and highly motivated Not a financial decision but a "passion" decision All Columbia postbac students are involved in volunteering in various clinical and research settings Why are postbac programs becoming so popular: Around 140 programs across the country Career changers - mostly intentional Economy as a possible factor Victoria's background: Undergrad and graduate (PhD) student at Columbia Teaching English classes in Columbia Getting exposed to School of General Studies (the only college in the Ivy League which has become a destination for nontraditional students who want to have a rigorous, elite education) Postbac premed advising: 4 full-time advisers in the program Support services at the School of General Studies Admissions process at Columbia: Accelerated track through the postbac (1.5 years instead of 2 years) 1st half of the program - students may choose some classes per semester 2nd half of the program - students are required to attend full-time Shadowing opportunities: All students are required to complete at least 120 hours of clinical work during their time in the program Access to the largest municipal hospital system in the US Active and robust database of clinical opportunities Standing relationships with a number of New York City hospitals The struggles of transitioning into science-based curriculum: Reacquiring that student identity Not having done any science studies How Columbia University is supporting their postbac students: Academic resource center Postbac coaching program Seminars on transferable skills, best way to study for the sciences, etc. Mentorship Classes geared towards MCAT prep and MCAT prep advising and panels Glide year counseling Interview advising (Mastering the Art of the Medical School Interview workshop and for the Multiple Mini Interviews or MMIs) What is the glide year? Students who don't apply for linkage admissions (which is like early admission to medical schools) take a glide year Students get access to a database of glide year opportunities so they can spend the glide year related to health care locally, nationally, and internationally What Columbia University is looking for in their applicants: Strong academic credentials (GPA 3.6-3.7) Great stories about how they got to this point Dr. Rosner shares some incredible stories of their postbac students Some pieces of advice for premed students: There are times when what you're learning feels disconnected from the future that you imagine for yourself as a medical provider. Find a way to spend time in clinical settings (shadowing, volunteering, etc.) to get yourself out into the world of health care and use that as the engine to drive you through your studies. Find the program that works for you. Links and Other Resources: Social Justice Medicine organization at Columbia AAMC's list of postbac programs New York Times article about postbac programs If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
More info...
40 min
January 19, 2013
9: Interview with WhiteCoatDO.com Publisher Ryan
Session 09 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Ryan Nguyen, a 1st year medical student at Western University College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific. He now blogs at WhiteCoatDO.com., a premed blog that provides a wealth of information about the admissions process. First, Ryan answers a question from a listener regarding going to medical school in a foreign country because it would be free while doing his practice in the US. Here are some of Ryan's thoughts: Going to a foreign medical school should not be your first choice Coming back to the US to do a residency is extremely difficult Don't worry about the money. Thousands of student graduate every year with tons of debt but they're able to pay off. The fear of debt should not be a reason to go to medical school abroad where tuition is free Live like a student now so you can live like a doctor later, not vice versa. Moving onto the discussion, Ryan shares his experiences transitioning from undergrad to medical student, studying 8 hours a day, how his undergrad classes helped him in medical school, and his medical school application journey. The show also touches a little on their thoughts on a 3-year medical school curriculum. Here are the highlights of the conversation with Ryan: Ryan's path to medical school: Adjusting to the volume and pace of medical school Contrast between undergrad and medical school Studying 6-8 hours a day Majoring in microbiology Thoughts on 3-year medical school curriculum: An interesting experiment A nontraditional premed may be able to handle the workload Dr. Ryan Gray thinks it should even be 5 years The importance of taking breaks: A time to decompress To keep you mentally refreshed How he came to blogging: Having gotten inspired by other inspiring blogs Initially experimenting on his posts Finding his niche in documenting the application process Being able to network with other people on healthcare and social media Started PracticalPremed.com when he was a premed Created WhiteCoatDO.com when he got to medical school Ryan's MCAT Prep: Making MCAT as your number one concern Taking the Kaplan MCAT course Ryan's peers used Examkrackers a lot and they did well Learning the small tricks along the way Ryan delayed taking the exam to make sure he was ready to take it Taking the practice test once every few weeks Relax 2-3 days before the exam (Something Ryan didn't do but highly recommends it) Getting a 30 on the MCAT MD vs. DO schools: Applying broadly to 30 MD and DO schools (half-half) 8-9 interview requests and going to 6 of them MCAT mental tricks: Do the practice test the same way you'd take the actual test. Approach it as a game. Don't memorize everything but understand the concepts and know how to apply the different concepts to the questions. Systems-based vs. traditional learning: Western U doing traditional and systems-based Systems-based learning helps you integrate all information together at one time instead of taking courses separately Some pieces of advice for premed students: Don't be afraid to go after things if you really want them. There are so many outlets you can pursue to reinvigorate something and make something that makes it all worth it. Links and Other Resources: WhiteCoatDO.com PracticalPremed.com http://calnewport.com/blog/ (Study Hacks) mdjourney.com Examkrackers books Kaplan MCAT Course Netter's Atlas of Human Anatomy If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over a medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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44 min
January 10, 2013
8: Medical School HQ Podcast - Non-Traditional Pre Med Torray
Session 08 In today's episode, Ryan talks with Torray, a postbac student at Charles Drew University (affiliated with UCLA) and a former teacher. Like Russel in Session 6, Torray shares his experience as a nontraditional premed student. Ryan also answers a question from Delvin, a junior in college, about taking community college courses to fulfill medical school prerequisites. Back in Session 5, Rich from OldPreMeds.org and Ryan talked about community college credits where medical school admissions committees may not deem an A grade as such considering that it's not as rigorous of a course as going to a full 4-year university. Another problem is that not all medical schools accept community college credits. Should you really need to attend a community college, call the medical schools you're interested in applying to and discuss this with them. Going back to the interview, listen in as Torray talks about his interesting nontraditional premed path, his shadowing experience, the lack of premed advising, Here are the highlights of the conversation with Torray: Where he is now on his path: Finishing an 11-year career in educations Still on the list as a substitute teacher but really focusing on his postbac program Taking a formal postbac program in Charles Drew University What opened his path to medical school: Torray had a mild heart attack and was out of work for 3 months Although he has a rewarding career as a teacher, he wanted to do something different Made a list of things he wanted to do including going to medical school Volunteering in a trauma surgery center that cemented his decision to go to medical school Torray's shadowing experience: Three volunteer assignments he has worked on Cedar-Sinai's Independent Student Volunteer program Allowed a mix of volunteering and shadowing His attending asking if he was interested in research and saying yes which led to the article being published and Torray being listed as an author How his life experiences have helped him in interacting with people: Allowing him to ask about information in a genuine manner and not obnoxiously Building a relationship versus just a list of canned questions Doing little things to help the doctors and patients Why he didn't go to medicine early on: Not getting any support from his university's department Feeling not having a "gunner" mentality won't get you to medical school Not realizing that there are different personalities in medicine and his personality would have fit Two book recommendations from Torray: Medical School Confidential (talks about being a premed, a postbac student, MCAT, AMCAS, application, match day, residency, and more!) MSAR (gives you an opportunity to look at every medical school in the US, Canada, and the Caribbean) Reaching out to medical schools and building relationships: 20 schools he was interested in applying to 8 schools responding back and wanting to have a phone conversation with him Phone conversations lasting for 30 mins - 2 hours Realizing the skill of selling: Medical school is like a business. They have to find you worthy. You are not only marketing yourself, but your university's name as well. Selling is a skill that you have to think about Torray's thought process in choosing between MD and DO schools: Having mentors who are MDs Not having enough information or exposure to DO schools His two biggest obstacles: Going into the sciences coming from a non-science background - Seeing the connection between what he was studying and what he was seeing in a hospital setting Poor advisement Some words of wisdom from Torrey: Be genuine when you ask questions. Asking "low-level" questions wastes that relationship that you could start with the other person since you haven't put in the work needed to garner the type of answers you need. Getting into medical school is not about averages because medical schools accept in ranges. Although important, medical school is more than just the GPA or MCAT. Listen to what other people say but at the end of the day, you have to make your own path. Links and Other Resources: Charles Drew Post-Bac Torray's Research on PubMed Atul Gawande's Books MSAR®: Getting Started Medical School Admission Requirements Med School Confidential: A Complete Guide to the Medical School Experience: By Students, for Students If you need any help with the medical school interview, go to medschoolinterviewbook.com. Sign up and you will receive parts of the book so you can help shape the future of the book. This book will include over 500 questions that may be asked during interview day as well as real-life questions, answers, and feedback from all of the mock interviews Ryan has been doing with students. Are you a nontraditional student? Go check out oldpremeds.org. For more great content, check out www.mededmedia.com for more of the shows produced by the Medical School Headquarters including the OldPremeds Podcast and watch out for more shows in the future! Check out our new sponsor, Elite Medical Scribes. Find out how being a scribe can help you grow as a premed and help you get into medical school. Free MCAT Gift: Free 30+ page guide with tips to help you maximize your MCAT score and which includes discount codes for MCAT prep as well. Hang out with us over at medicalschoolhq.net/group. Click join and we'll add you up to our private Facebook group. Share your successes and miseries with the rest of us. Check out our partner magazine, www.premedlife.com to learn more about awesome premed information. Next Step Test Prep: Get one-on-one tutoring for the MCAT and maximize your score. Get $50 off their tutoring program when you mention that you heard about this on the podcast or through the MSHQ website. Check out their 10-full length practice tests and save 10% using the code "MSHQ". Listen to our podcast for free at iTunes: medicalschoolhq.net/itunes and leave us a review there! Email Ryan at ryan@medicalschoolhq.net or connect with him on Twitter @medicalschoolhq
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54 min
January 2, 2013
7: 10 Traits You Need to Succeed in Medical School
Session 07 In today's episode, Ryan is joined for the first time by his wife, Allison Gray, who is a Senior Neurology Resident, her last year of residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. http://www.medicalschoolhq.net/about/ A senior high school student sent in a very personal email describing her dream of becoming a doctor along with her struggles in life. She also posed two questions, being: What qualities are essential to have in order to get through medical school? Do you really have to be academically gifted and grow up in an advantaged family? In response to these questions, Ryan and Allison came up with a list of qualities that would help students through medical school and even through undergraduate, residency, and beyond. 10 Traits You Need to Succeed in Medical School Discipline Self-discipline comes from your own motivation or parents and teachers As a medical student and physician, you agree to become a life long learner and you need to discipline to be able to study and keep studying. Make studying as a priority regardless of what's going on in your life Discipline is important to learn on an ongoing basis so you can serve the patients you're taking care of Persistence/Drive The journey to become a doctor is a long road an