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July 20, 2019
Best Of: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum / Satirist Randy Rainbow
Emily Nussbaum, Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic for 'The New Yorker,' talks about the art of "terrible men" in the #MeToo era and TV's revolution (from low brow to high art). Her new book of essays and reviews is 'I Like to Watch.'Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Copperhead' by Alexi Zentner. Randy Rainbow writes and performs satirical songs about President Trump set to melodies of show tunes. "I always considered song parody kind of cheap," the Emmy-nominated performer says. "But ... I've gotten [such a] response from others ... that I'm appreciating it as an art form."
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49 min
July 19, 2019
50th Anniversary Of The Moon Landing
For the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, we're listening back to archival interviews with Michael Collins, who circled the moon in the command capsule while Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong were on the moon's surface; Alan Shepard, the first American in space; Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield; and test pilot Chuck Yeager, the first to break the sound barrier.
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49 min
July 18, 2019
Corruption & Dysfunction In The Border Protection Agency
When Customs and Border Protection was formed after 9/11 (as a part of the Department of Homeland Security), many agents signed up for the job thinking it would be a quasi-military position, focused on catching terrorists and stopping drug smugglers. Journalist Garrett Graff says in recent years, the border patrol agents mostly have been doing humanitarian and administrative work for asylum-seekers. "It went out and built its ranks by recruiting Rambo, when it actually turns out that what the border patrol needs is Mother Teresa," he says. Graff talks about the leadership vacuum that's plagued the agency and worsened the border crisis. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new remake of 'The Lion King.'
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49 min
July 17, 2019
Satirist Randy Rainbow
Rainbow writes and performs satirical songs about President Trump set to melodies of show tunes. "I always considered song parody kind of cheap," the Emmy-nominated performer says. "But ... I've gotten [such a] response from others ... that I'm appreciating it as an art form." Also, we remember retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who died yesterday at 99. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2011.
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48 min
July 16, 2019
Novelist Colson Whitehead On 'The Nickel Boys'
The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist's new book, 'The Nickel Boys,' is based on the true story of a notorious Florida reform school where many boys were beaten and sexually abused. Dozens of unmarked graves were discovered on the school grounds, which the state shut down in 2011. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel, and then the author speaks with contributor Dave Davies. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the book 'Jazz from Detroit.'
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49 min
July 15, 2019
TV Critic Emily Nussbaum
The Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic for 'The New Yorker' talks about the art of "terrible men" in the #MeToo era, TV's revolution (from low to high brow), and what she calls "the bad fan." Her new book of essays and reviews is 'I Like to Watch.'
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48 min
July 13, 2019
Best Of: Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof' / How 'Maiden' Sailed Into History
A new Yiddish language production of 'Fiddler on the Roof' is currently running off-Broadway. Steven Skybell, who plays Tevye, and Joel Grey, who directs the show, explain why the play still resonates.Film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'Midsommar.'In 1989, 26-year-old skipper Tracy Edwards set out on what was considered an unthinkable journey for a woman — to sail the 33,000 mile Whitbread Round The World Race. She assembled an all-female crew, restored a shabby racing yacht, and took to sea. The new documentary 'Maiden' tracks their 9-month-long race and the sexism they faced at every turn. Edwards spoke with 'Fresh Air' contributor Dave Davies.
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50 min
July 12, 2019
MLB's Keith Hernandez / Remembering Pitcher Jim Bouton & Actor Rip Torn
The former first baseman played on championship teams with the Cardinals and Mets, and made a memorable appearance on 'Seinfeld.' His memoir, now out in paperback, is 'I'm Keith Hernandez.'MLB pitcher Jim Bouton, who died Wednesday, spoke to 'Fresh Air' in 1986 about his 1970 tell-all memoir, 'Ball Four,' in which he drew on his seven years with the Yankees to offer an insider's guide to baseball.Actor Rip Torn, who died Tuesday, won an Emmy Award for playing the gruff producer Artie on 'The Larry Sanders Show.' In 1994, he told Terry Gross that he based his character on Johnny Carson's long time producer.Also, critic John Powers reviews 'London Kills,' about a Scotland Yard team led by a detective whose wife has gone missing.
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48 min
July 11, 2019
The Ongoing Crisis At The U.S.-Mexico Border
NY Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson has been documenting the impact of the Trump administration's policies on migrants — and on the workers who deal with the large number of people held in detention. Dickerson talks about the squalid conditions at the Clint, Texas, border patrol center, where toddlers were living for weeks without diapers, and kids were living in cold, crowded holding areas without showers, clean clothes, toothbrushes, or enough food. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Farewell,' starring Awkwafina.
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49 min
July 10, 2019
Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof'
A new, Yiddish language production of the musical is currently running off-Broadway. Steven Skybell, who plays Tevye, and Joel Grey, who directs the show, explain why the play still resonates.
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48 min
July 9, 2019
Gerrymandering, The 2020 Census & Voter Suppression
'Mother Jones' journalist Ari Berman says recent Supreme Court decisions on redistricting and the 2020 census will determine which party is in power in the next decade. Berman says while Americans are justifiably worried that Russia might try again to interfere in our 2020 election, we also need to also be focusing on homegrown threats to our democracy. "The Russians didn't invent voter suppression. The Russians didn't gut the Voting Rights Act. The Russians didn't draw heavily gerrymandered maps in the last redistricting cycle. The Russians didn't add a citizenship question to the 2020 census." Berman also explains how the gerrymandering decision and the citizenship question could determine the political future.Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Copperhead' by Alexi Zentner.
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49 min
July 8, 2019
A Bioethicist's Personal Struggle With Opioids
Travis Rieder became dependent on opioids after a motorcycle accident in 2015 that crushed his left foot, and forced him to endure six surgeries. His book 'In Pain' draws on his insights as a patient, and his subsequent research into pain medicine, to examine the larger problems and dilemmas surrounding prescription opioids and the larger opioid crisis.
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48 min
July 6, 2019
Best Of: Sarah Jessica Parker / 'Leaving The Witness'
Parker is best-known for her role as the iconic single New Yorker Carrie Bradshaw on 'Sex and the City.' Now, on the HBO series 'Divorce,' she plays Frances, a woman navigating the dissolution of her marriage. Also, Ken Tucker reviews two country hits that are challenging traditional notions of the genre, by Lil Nas X and Blanco Brown.Amber Scorah was a third-generation Jehovah's Witness raised to believe that the Armageddon was imminent. Scorah talks about her decision to leave her marriage and her religion and start over. Her memoir is 'Leaving the Witness.'
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50 min
July 5, 2019
Willie Nelson
At the age of 86, Nelson is still going strong. He's touring and has a new record, 'Ride Me Back Home.' We'll listen back to two interviews with Nelson and hear a review of the new album. When Terry Gross spoke to him in 1996 he told her why he had trouble fitting in to country music. "My songs had a few chords in them, and the country songs weren't supposed to have over three chords. My phrasing was sort of funny. I didn't sing on the beat. I just didn't fit the slots, you know? And I wouldn't take orders and so I became one of those guys that you know they had to call something else."
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52 min
July 4, 2019
Lizzo
The flute-playing pop star celebrates self-love on her latest album, 'Cuz I Love You.' About 10 years ago, "I made the decision that I just wanted to be happy with my body," she says. Lizzo talks to Terry Gross about collaborating with Prince, feminism, and using music to help people find a positive place within themselves. [Originally broadcast In May 2019]
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49 min
July 3, 2019
Sarah Jessica Parker
Parker is best-known for her role as the iconic single New Yorker Carrie Bradshaw on 'Sex and the City.' Now, on the HBO series 'Divorce,' she plays Frances, a woman navigating the dissolution of her marriage. Parker spoke with Terry Gross about growing up poor but engaged in the arts, the #MeToo movement, and how she doesn't relate to Carrie (or the other 'SATC' characters) at all. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'Midsommar.'
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48 min
July 2, 2019
Uncovering The Story Of Chernobyl
HBO's recent series 'Chernobyl' has renewed public interest in the 1986 explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Journalist Adam Higginbotham has spent years investigating the causes of the accident and the dramatic efforts to contain the damage. He says design flaws, human hubris and Soviet secrecy all contributed to the disaster. His book is 'Midnight in Chernobyl.'Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'I'm All Smiles' by pianist George Cables.
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48 min
July 1, 2019
From Nightmares To PTSD, The Toll On Facebook Moderators
'Verge' journalist Casey Newton investigated working conditions for the moderators who determine what material can be posted to Facebook. Many are traumatized by the images of hate and violence they see. "I've talked to folks who will wake up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat. They will have nightmares about the content that they saw, and eventually, many of them get diagnosed with PTSD." Newton also talks about how Facebook is starting what's been called a "supreme court" for contested content decisions, and we'll discuss what the social network is doing to prepare for the 2020 election. Also, Ken Tucker reviews two country hits that are challenging traditional notions of the genre, by Lil Nas X and Blanco Brown.
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48 min
June 29, 2019
Best Of: Founders OF The 1st AIDS Ward / Comic Ramy Youssef
The new documentary '5B' tells the story of America's first hospital unit dedicated to the care of people with AIDS. Nurse Cliff Morrison helped create 5B in 1983, and worked on it with Dr. Paul Volberding. They talked with Terry Gross about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, and how they sought to give patients compassionate care through human touch when most medical workers wore full body suits because they were afraid they'd get infected.Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Yesterday' by 'Slumdog Millionaire' director Danny Boyle. In the semi-autobiographical Hulu series 'Ramy,' Youssef plays a first generation Muslim American who follows some — but not all — of the rules of his religion. Youssef, whose parents immigrated from Egypt, also co-created the series. He says he can relate to his character's "picking and choosing" approach to his faith. "Sometimes we would call it 'Allah carte,'" he says.
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50 min
June 28, 2019
Novelist John Green On OCD
Green's latest novel, 'Turtles All The Way Down,' is about a teenage girl with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. The author spoke with Terry Gross about his own experience with OCD in 2017. "It starts out with one little thought, and then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have. It's like there's an invasive weed that just spreads out of control." Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg considers how the word "algorithm" has come to stand in for the power that technology wields in our life. And TV critic David Bianculli reviews the Showtime mini-series 'The Loudest Voice' about Fox News creator, Roger Ailes.
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48 min
June 27, 2019
How An All-Female Crew Sailed Round The World & Into The History Books
In 1989, 26-year-old skipper Tracy Edwards set out on what was thought of as an unthinkable journey for a woman — to sail the 33,000 mile Whitbread Round The World Race. She assembled an all-female crew, restored a shabby racing yacht, and took to sea. The new documentary 'Maiden' tracks their 9-month-long race and the sexism they faced at every turn. Edwards spoke with 'Fresh Air' contributor Dave Davies. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Yesterday,' by 'Slumdog Millionaire' director Danny Boyle.
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49 min
June 26, 2019
Founders Of The First AIDS Ward
The new documentary '5B' tells the story of America's first hospital unit dedicated to the care of people with AIDS. Nurse Cliff Morrison helped create 5B in 1983, and worked on it with Dr. Paul Volberding. They talked with Terry Gross about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, how they sought to give patients compassionate care, and the rampant homophobia at the time.
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49 min
June 25, 2019
Comic Ramy Youssef
In the semi-autobiographical Hulu series 'Ramy,' Youssef plays a first generation Muslim American who follows some — but not all — of the rules of his religion. Youssef, whose parents immigrated from Egypt, also co-created the series. He says he can relate to his character's "picking and choosing" approach to his faith. "Sometimes we would call it 'Allah carte,'" he says. Youssef talks with Terry Gross about the series, feeling torn between wanting to fit in and his faith, and his stand-up comedy. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Ask Again, Yes' by Mary Beth Keane, which she describes as "profound, yet unpretentious."
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47 min
June 24, 2019
A Former Jehovah's Witness Reflects On Leaving Her Faith
Amber Scorah was a third generation Jehovah's Witness raised to believe that the Armageddon was imminent. As a teenager she was shunned from her religious community for having sex with her boyfriend. Scorah went on to marry an elder in the church, and she and her husband traveled to China as missionaries. But gradually doubt began to set in. Scorah speaks with Terry Gross about her decision to leave her marriage and her religion and start over. Her memoir is 'Leaving the Witness.' Also, John Powers reviews the HBO series 'Years and Years.'
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48 min
June 22, 2019
Best Of: Ava DuVernay / Bill Hader
Filmmaker Ava DuVernay's Netflix series 'When They See Us' tells the story of how five black and brown boys, known as the Central Park Five, were manipulated into confessing to a brutal rape they did not commit. DuVernay focuses on the boys' perspective — and the criminal justice system that failed them. Ken Tucker reviews Willie Nelson's new album 'Ride Me Back Home.'Bill Hader, who became famous as a writer and performer on 'Saturday Night Live,' now stars in the HBO series 'Barry.' Hader speaks with Terry Gross about writing the series with Alec Berg and struggling with severe anxiety while on 'SNL.'
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50 min
June 21, 2019
John Prine
The singer, songwriter and guitarist was recently inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Prine spoke with Terry Gross in 2018 when his album 'The Tree of Forgiveness' was released. He described how his voice changed after neck cancer: "It dropped down lower and feels friendlier." Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the final seasons of FX's 'Legion' and Netflix's 'Jessica Jones.'
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46 min
June 20, 2019
Bill Hader On 'Barry'
Hader, who became famous as a writer and performer on 'Saturday Night Live,' now stars in the HBO series 'Barry.' Hader plays a Marine who suffers from depression and PTSD ever since returning from Afghanistan. While working as a hit man in Los Angeles, he discovers that he wants to pursue acting instead. Hader speaks with Terry Gross about writing the series with Alec Berg, struggling with severe anxiety while on 'SNL,' and his love of old movies.
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47 min
June 19, 2019
Ava DuVernay On 'When They See Us'
DuVernay's Netflix series tells the story of how five black and brown boys, known as the Central Park Five, were manipulated into confessing to a brutal rape they did not commit. 'When They See Us' focuses on the boys' perspective — and the criminal justice system that failed them. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Toy Story 4.'
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46 min
June 18, 2019
Uncovering The Story Of Major Taylor, America's First Black Sports Hero
At the height of the Jim Crow era, Taylor broke barriers by becoming the country's fastest and most famous cyclist. Author and 'Washington Post' journalist Michael Kranish tells his story in the new book, 'The World's Fastest Man.' "He really belongs in the pantheon of civil rights leaders as a sports athlete," Kranish says. "He was able to use his athleticism and his championships for a greater purpose to show that the racist theories of eugenics and other things were wrong." Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan recommends two new noir suspense novels for summer — 'This Storm' by James Ellroy and 'Conviction' by Denise Mina. And Ken Tucker reviews Willie Nelson's new album 'Ride Me Back Home.'
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48 min
June 17, 2019
Rethinking 'Elderhood'
Geriatrician Dr. Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. "I need to be a different sort of doctor for people at different ages and phases of old age," she says. Aronson writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, 'Elderhood.'Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a live recording from saxophonist Stan Getz.
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48 min
June 15, 2019
Best Of: How Ordinary People Got Us To The Moon / Actor Damian Lewis
This summer marks 50 years since the first Apollo moon landing. Journalist Charles Fishman's new book 'One Giant Leap' focuses on the untold stories of the ordinary men and women who worked behind-the-scenes on the Apollo missions. "Apollo was the biggest non-military effort in the history of human civilization," Fishman says. He talks about the team at Playtex who designed the spacesuits, the computer programmers, and the state of the U.S. space program today. Ken Tucker reviews Bruce Springsteen's new solo album, 'Western Stars.' Classically-trained British actor Damian Lewis plays a ruthless hedge-fund manager on Showtime's 'Billions,' which recently ended its fourth season. He also starred in the series 'Homeland' as Nicholas Brody, a Marine sergeant who converts to Islam in captivity.
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50 min
June 14, 2019
'I Wrote This Book Because I Love You'
Writer and cartoonist Tim Kreider admits unabashedly that the longest relationship of his adult life was with the stray cat that became his companion for 19 years. His collection of personal essays details his many unconventional relationships, which include the girlfriend he traveled with on a circus train, a married woman he fell in love with and his whirlwind romance with a sexual performance artist. "One of the few conclusions I may have reached from writing this book is that when we say 'relationship' or 'marriage' we all think we're talking about the same thing," Kreider says. "But I think there are a lot of different deals out there." (Originally broadcast Feb. 2018) Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Showtime cop drama 'City on a Hill.'
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48 min
June 13, 2019
How Hackers Pose A Threat To Cities & Elections
'New York Times' cybersecurity correspondent Nicole Perlroth says hacking tools developed by the NSA were stolen, posted online and are now being used in cyberattacks, including one on the city of Baltimore.Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Last Black Man in San Francisco.'
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48 min
June 12, 2019
How Ordinary People Got Us To The Moon
This summer marks 50 years since the first Apollo moon landing. Journalist Charles Fishman's new book 'One Giant Leap' focuses on the untold stories of the ordinary men and women who worked behind-the-scenes on the Apollo missions. "Apollo was the biggest non-military effort in the history of human civilization," Fishman says. He talks about the team at Playtex who designed the spacesuits, the computer programmers, and how NASA nearly forgot to send an American flag into space.
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48 min
June 11, 2019
Inside Kim Jong Un's North Korea
'Washington Post' journalist Anna Fifield visited North Korea and interviewed many of its citizens — including members of Kim Jong Un's family — for her new book about the country and its leader. Her book is 'The Great Successor.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'The Body in Question' by Jill Ciment, about jurors on a murder trial.
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48 min
June 10, 2019
Actor Damian Lewis
The classically-trained British actor plays a ruthless hedge-fund manager on Showtime's 'Billions,' which recently ended its fourth season. Lewis describes his character as "the embodiment of the American dream." He also starred in the series 'Homeland' as Nicholas Brody, a Marine sergeant who converts to Islam in captivity. Also, Soraya Nadia McDonald reviews 'When They See Us,' Ava DuVernay's devastating new miniseries about the Central Park Five.
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48 min
June 8, 2019
Best Of: Christina Applegate / The Future Of Food
Christina Applegate stars in the Netflix series 'Dead to Me,' opposite Linda Cardellini, as a woman grieving the sudden death of her husband. She speaks with Terry Gross about her own experience with grief and loss, her double mastectomy, and working as a teen actress in 'Married with Children.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new installments of the Netflix anthology series 'Black Mirror.'Environmental journalist Amanda Little talks about efforts to create a global food supply for a world that will be hotter, drier and more crowded. Little writes about meat cultured in a lab, 3D printed food, and indoor vertical farming in 'The Fate of Food.'
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50 min
June 7, 2019
Remembering Musician Dr. John
New Orleans musician Mac Rebennack, A.K.A. Dr. John, died yesterday at 77. He was known for his raspy voice and hits such as "Right Place, Wrong Time" and "Such A Night." Rebennack spoke with Terry Gross in 1986. Contributor Zahra Noorbakhsh, who is Muslim and Iranian-American, shares a story about how the Christchurch shooting coincided with a personal health crisis. Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Late Night,' starring Emma Thompson as a seasoned late night talk show host whose recent drop in ratings has her fighting for her job. She hires a new writer (Mindy Kaling) in hopes of saving the show.
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47 min
June 6, 2019
Trump, M.B.Z. & The United Arab Emirates
We talk with 'NYT' international correspondent David Kirkpatrick about how Prince Mohammed bin Zayed (M.B.Z.), the ruler of the United Arab Emirates, became one of the most influential foreign voices in Washington. He's urged the U.S. to adopt his increasingly aggressive position against his enemies, including Iran and the Muslim Brotherhood.Also, John Powers reviews the new season of HBO's hit series 'Big Little Lies.'
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47 min
June 5, 2019
Actor Christina Applegate
Applegate stars in the Netflix series 'Dead to Me,' opposite Linda Cardellini, as a woman grieving the sudden death of her husband. She speaks with Terry Gross about her own experience with grief and loss, her double mastectomy, 'Married with Children,' and doing 'Sweet Charity' on Broadway.Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new installments of the Netflix anthology series 'Black Mirror.'
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48 min
June 4, 2019
The Case Against R. Kelly
Nearly 20 years ago, reporter and pop music critic Jim DeRogatis broke the story that R&B superstar R. Kelly was allegedly sexually abusing underage girls. It all started with an anonymous fax to his office at the 'Chicago Sun-Times.' Fourteen months after the first story was published, he received the now-infamous videotape in his home mailbox. DeRogatis spoke with Terry Gross about his two decades following this story, the current charges against Kelly', and his new book 'Soulless.'Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the debut novel 'On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous' from Vietnamese-American author Ocean Vuong.
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48 min
June 3, 2019
The Future Of Food
Environmental journalist Amanda Little talks about efforts to create a global food supply for a world that will be hotter, drier and more crowded. Little writes about meat cultured in a lab, 3D printed food, and indoor vertical farming in 'The Fate of Food.' Classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a new recording from the Boston Symphony Orchestra of Busoni's Piano Concerto.
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47 min
June 1, 2019
Best Of: Why College Students Are So Stressed / How Eugenics Shaped U.S. Immigration
As colleges and universities across the country report an explosion of mental health problems, a new book argues that college life may actually be more stressful than ever. Dr. Anthony Rostain and family therapist B. Janet Hibbs are the authors of 'The Stressed Years of Their Lives.' They say today's college students are experiencing an "inordinate amount of anxiety" — much of it centered on "surviving college and doing well." Justin Chang reviews the new Elton John biopic 'Rocketman.' Journalist Daniel Okrent says that the eugenics movement — a junk science that stemmed from the belief that certain races and ethnicities were morally and genetically superior to others — informed the Immigration Act of 1924, which restricted entrance to the U.S. Jews, Italians, Greeks and other Eastern Europeans were targeted. His book is 'The Guarded Gate.'
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49 min
May 31, 2019
A Return To 'Deadwood'
The HBO series about a lawless mining town in 19th century South Dakota is now the basis of a new film. TV critic David Bianculli shares his review and then we'll listen back to interviews with actor Timothy Olyphant, who played the sheriff Seth Bullock, and we'll also hear from David Milch who created and wrote the show. And film critic Justin Chang reviews the new Elton John biopic 'Rocketman.'
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49 min
May 30, 2019
SCOTUS And Abortion
'New York Times' correspondent Adam Liptak talks about how President Trump's two appointees might change the Supreme Court — including its direction on abortion: "It's not hard to write a decision striking down Roe," he says. "It's built on quicksand." Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews drummer Jeff Williams' new album 'Bloom.'
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48 min
May 29, 2019
Inside 'Sara Berman's Closet'
The art installation 'Sara Berman's Closet' chronicles the life of a woman who grew up in a shtetl in Belarus, fled with family to Palestine, and then eventually moved to New York City to start a new life. Berman's daughter, children's book author and illustrator Maira Kalman and Berman's grandson, designer Alex Kalman, tell her story in a new book accompaniment to the museum exhibit. Also, we remember Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author Tony Horwitz. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1998 when 'Confederates in the Attic' was published. He died this week at age 60. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews his new book 'Spying on the South,' published just weeks before his death.
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48 min
May 28, 2019
The Mental Health 'Epidemic' On College Campuses
As colleges and universities across the country report an explosion of mental health problems, a new book argues that college life may actually be more stressful than ever. Dr. Anthony Rostain, co-author of 'The Stressed Years of Their Lives,' notes that today's college students are experiencing an "inordinate amount of anxiety" — much of it centered on "surviving college and doing well." Co-author and family therapist B. Janet Hibbs joins Rostain to talk about the root causes of the stress and how families can help. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews four newly released books by Asian writers.
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46 min
May 27, 2019
Sir Elton John
The new biographical musical film 'Rocketman' is based on Elton John's life story. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2013 about what he calls "Elton John excess," his fear of sex as a young man, and how Liberace's example encouraged him to make the piano a star instrument and embrace wild costumes.
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49 min
May 25, 2019
Best Of: John Waters / Lizzo
John Waters has made a career out of rebelling against the norm. The 'Pink Flamingos' and 'Hairspray' director returns to 'Fresh Air' to talk about what he was like as a kid, and how he still finds ways to break the rules as a self-described "filth elder." His new book about his career in Hollywood is 'Mr. Know-It-All.' Rapper, singer and flutist Lizzo talks to Terry Gross about collaborating with Prince, feminism, and using music to help people find a positive place within themselves. Her new album is 'Cuz I Love You.'
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50 min
May 24, 2019
Michael Pollan On the 'New Science' Of Psychedelics
Pollan discusses the history of psychedelic drugs, including LSD and magic mushrooms, and explains how they're currently being used experimentally in therapeutic settings to treat depression, addiction, and fear of death. The author experimented with psychedelics for research. "I had an experience that was by turns frightening and ecstatic and weird," he says. 'How To Change Your Mind' is now out in paperback. Also, critic John Powers reviews 'Booksmart,' a film about two brainy girls who are desperate to party with the cool kids in the final 24 hours before high school graduation.
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48 min
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