Episodes
How to Be More Popular & What's Wrong with The Science of Finding New Cures
Published June 12, 2017
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40 min
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    Do people have to take off their shoes before coming into your house? In Asian cultures this is a pretty common custom – and I’ll explore all the reasons why this is a really good idea for everyone, everywhere else too. Then we’ll look at pros and cons of popularity. In high school, being popular is great – but it turns out that there are 2 types of popularity – and the one most of us think of - actually does more harm than good in the long run. Mitch Prinstein, professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina and author of the book Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World (http://amzn.to/2scajGW) explores both kinds of popularity and reveals whether or not it is true that popular kids “peak” in high school and have a tough time after that. Also, there is a strange connection between owning a cat and your increased risk of suicide. If you have a cat, this is worth listening to. And when scientists investigate new cures and new drugs, you probably think it is a pretty strict and efficient procedure. But it really isn’t. In fact there are all kinds of problems with the way science works to find cures and treat illness. Richard Harris, a journalist for NPR and author of the book Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hopes and Wastes Billions (http://amzn.to/2srTd8J) takes a peak behind the curtain at the inefficiencies of science that affects us all.
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