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May 9, 2019
I got a text from my sister, who was in the hospital for induction, at 1:30am that rocked my world. She text me and told me that her nurse – the nurse who will be receiving my new nephew into the world – uses NRSNG. Moments like this rock me to the core.  I know that every human will one day cross paths with a nurse.  Whether that is during the best moments or darkest moments in life, a nurse will be there. Our mission at NRSNG is to be “the best place to learn nursing” . . . the reason that means so much to us is because we fully recognize that one day, a nurse who uses NRSNG will care for me, my wife, or my child.  That motivates us to do our BEST each and every day. Listen to the podcast episode here: Mission Statement I would be lying to you if I said that being a nurse was easy . . . it’s not. But it IS worth it.  There are beautiful moments that make you a better person.  There is no better work in the world than touching human lives. To help you through those most difficult moments – a personal mission statement can be your best friend. Take 2 minutes to write down your “WHY”.  We will each have our own personal “WHY” and I can’t tell you what yours is, but write it down and let it carry you through those hardest moments.
January 14, 2019
I’m pumped to share the brand new NRSNG Podcast app with y’all.  I call it the NRSNG Radio app . . . we’ve taken all of our podcasts and put them into an easy to use app so you can listen anytime, anywhere . . . best part?  It’s free.  You can download for iOS or Android at: https://www.nrsng.com/podcastapp
May 26, 2017
Can I be honest? I had an amazing experience last month.   It was one of those moments when you are filled with thousands of emotions ranging from happiness to sadness all at the same time.  Have you ever felt that before? The past year has been incredibly busy for my family and I for many reasons, and this is something that I haven’t shared publicly, but in the last year my grandma and grandpa (on my mom’s side) both passed away almost exactly a year apart from each other, one from a stroke and the other from pneumonia complicated by dementia. This has been hard for the entire family, my mom especially (obviously). But I want to rewind the clock a bit to my first semester in nursing school, and then we will come back to last month. My First Semester of Nursing School During my first semester of nursing school one of my grandpa on my dads side passed away rather quickly.  That was in 2011.  I’ve talked many times about how difficult that first semester of nursing school was here and here. Long story short, my wife was 7 months pregnant.  We had just moved to Illinois from Texas.  We had just pulled out $40,000 in student loans. My parents were kind enough to pay for a ticket out to the funeral in Arizona.  I went to funeral, and it changed everything for me! I had a sort of epiphany. I realized that in those last minutes of my grandpas life nurses were caring for him.  I wanted to feel and know that they were caring for him as deeply as I would. I realized that I was very literally caring for someones grandpa, mom, daughter . . . loved one.  I vowed to myself to care more deeply for each and every patient. This Last Year So over the course of the last year, my grandma passed away (stroke) and just 12 months later, my grandpa (pneumonia).  I worked as a NEURO ICU nurse before doing NRSNG full-time so during the final moments of my grandmas life I was fielding questions and educating family on the process.  She passed away in 2016. They lived out in Arizona, and I am back in Texas.  So again, we were relying on amazing nurses to love and care for my grandparents. My grandpa began to get more and more sick (with both dementia and other complications). He finally became most bed ridden and developed pneumonia in April 2017.  On grandpas last night, two of my uncles were at the bedside with him.  We got the text at 1am that he had passed away. My wife and I, with our children flew out to Arizona for the funeral.  After the funeral we had a small lunch with family. My uncle came up to me in tears and told me about the last night with my grandpa in the hospital. He said the nurse that was taking care of my grandpas was amazing and so caring.  Then he shared this story with me: During the night he mentioned to the nurse that his nephew (me) was also a nurse. He said, “He has a website for nurses called NRSNG.com.”   The stopped what she was doing and said, “I love NRSNG without NRSNG I would have never made it through nursing school.” In that moment, I felt like the vow I made to myself back in 2011 to care deeper for my patients had come full circle. You never know who you will touch as a nurse. We love each of you and we take the responsibility of helping you along in your journey VERY seriously.  Thank you for being a part of the NRSNG Family.  Some day, it is very likely that ONE of you will care for me, my wife, or one of my children.  Thank you in advance!
August 23, 2016
The post White Blood Cell (WBC) appeared first on NRSNG.
August 22, 2016
So . . . I guess this episode is just about 8 minutes of a few thoughts on my mind.  Mostly though, I just want you all to know how much you really mean to us! NRSNG.com isn’t mine . . . it’s OURS.  And you are a part of it.   Thank you for being a part of the NRSNG family! Check out ScrubCheats at ScrubCheats.com
August 16, 2016
The post Troponin I (cTNL) appeared first on NRSNG.
August 11, 2016
The post Triglycerides (TG) appeared first on NRSNG.
August 9, 2016
The post Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) appeared first on NRSNG.
August 4, 2016
The post Sodium (Na+) appeared first on NRSNG.
August 2, 2016
The post Red Blood Cell (RBC) appeared first on NRSNG.
July 28, 2016
The post Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) appeared first on NRSNG.
July 26, 2016
The post Potassium (K+) appeared first on NRSNG.
July 21, 2016
The post Platelets (PLT) appeared first on NRSNG.
July 19, 2016
The post Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) appeared first on NRSNG.
July 14, 2016
The post Oxygen Saturation (SaO2) appeared first on NRSNG.
July 12, 2016
The post Osmolality appeared first on NRSNG.
July 5, 2016
The post Low Density Lipoprotein appeared first on NRSNG.
June 30, 2016
The post Lipase appeared first on NRSNG.
June 27, 2016
The post Lactic Acid appeared first on NRSNG.
June 23, 2016
The post Iron (Fe) appeared first on NRSNG.
June 21, 2016
The post International Normalized Ratio (INR) appeared first on NRSNG.
June 16, 2016
The post High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) appeared first on NRSNG.
June 14, 2016
The post Hemoglobin (Hbg) appeared first on NRSNG.
June 9, 2016
The post Hematocrit (Hct) appeared first on NRSNG.
June 7, 2016
The post Glycosylated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) appeared first on NRSNG.
June 2, 2016
The post Glucose appeared first on NRSNG.
May 31, 2016
The post Folic Acid appeared first on NRSNG.
May 26, 2016
The post Ferritin appeared first on NRSNG.
May 24, 2016
The post Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) appeared first on NRSNG.
May 19, 2016
The post D-Dimer (DDI) appeared first on NRSNG.
May 17, 2016
The post C-Reactive Protein (CRP) appeared first on NRSNG.
May 10, 2016
The post Creatinine (Cr) appeared first on NRSNG.
May 5, 2016
The post Creatine Kinase (CK) appeared first on NRSNG.
May 3, 2016
The post Cholesterol (Chol) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 28, 2016
The post Chloride (Cl-) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 26, 2016
The post Calcium (Ca+) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 21, 2016
The post Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 21, 2016
What are the Bills? HR 1602 – view the bill HERE S. 864 – view the bill HERE How Can You Get “Involved”? Listen to this podcast episode here with Senator O’Donnell It’s really as simple as: * Google “who is my congressman” * Call the number * Tell them to support the two bills above There is also more that you can do listed below. Most Trusted Profession For the past 14 years, nurses have been rated as the most trusted profession. Think about that . . . as nurses we are more trusted than: * Firemen * Police * Clergy Considering, as nurses, we are also one of the largest workforce groups in America, it seems . . . crazy . . . that our responsibilities, charting, patient ratios continue to go up while training continues to decline. What are Nurse to Patient Ratios? Basically what this refers to is number of patients any one nurse can take care of during a shift. Depending on the type of unit you work on this can vary, as it should, as a nurse in a Pediatric ICU will not be able to provide safe care to as many patients as a nurse on a geriatric unit. But here is where it gets . . . crazy. There are no federally mandated nurse-to-patient ratios. What does this mean? It means that while hospitals and Boards of Nursing can “suggest” “safe” ratios . . . in the end, the hospital can give you as many patients as they want when you show up to work.  Or, they can keep giving you new admissions during you shift. The issue has gotten so bad and become so ingrained in nursing culture that many nurses accept it as a “part of the job”.  In fact, GomerBlog recently release a satirical post regarding a fictions hospital CEO who raised Patient:Nurse ratios to 10:1 and the social media world exploded as many nurses accepted it as reality. Let's put an end to short staffing @smysofficial Patient safety first #safestaffing #NursesTakeDC pic.twitter.com/kf2jecrik1 — Nurse Born Products (@NurseBorn) April 18, 2016 What Does the Research Say? Research study after research study has indicated the dangers in poor staffing: Research has shown that by reducing the number of nurses, patient outcomes deteriorate and length of stay increases. Curtailing nurse staffing levels can also lead to poor staff morale, nurse retention and recruitment problems and malpractice suits, which can raise costs far above the expense of employing more nurses. By reducing nurse to patient ratios, that is, by reducing the number of patients (see nurse to patient ratio box opposite), it is probable that patient care will improve along with patient satisfaction, poor morale will dissipate, fewer lawsuits will be filed and agency nurse us...
April 19, 2016
The post Brain Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 17, 2016
The post Alkaline Phosphatase appeared first on NRSNG.
April 17, 2016
Normal 12-37 U/L Indications * Monitor progression of: * Liver disease * Response to treatments. * Monitor liver toxic medications Description Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) is an enzyme primarily found in liver and heart cells and to a smaller extent, AST can also be found in the pancreas, kidneys, skeletal muscle, and brain.   Levels of AST increase from cell death (necrosis) because the AST enzyme is released into the blood. What would cause increased levels? * Liver disease * Liver cancer * Shock * Congestive Heart Failure ( CHF) * Pericarditis * Biliary tract obstruction * Dermatomyositis * Pancreatitis * Muscular Dystrophy * CVA * Hemolytic anemia * Delirium Tremens (DT) What would cause decreased levels? * N/A
April 17, 2016
The post Ammonia (NH3) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 13, 2016
The post Total Bilirubin (T. Billi) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 13, 2016
The post Amylase appeared first on NRSNG.
April 12, 2016
The post Albumin appeared first on NRSNG.
April 7, 2016
The post Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) appeared first on NRSNG.
April 4, 2016
The post Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time appeared first on NRSNG.
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