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June 17, 2019
Jim Jarmusch on How to Pick Up on Your Actor's Needs
It's safe to say that legendary auteur Jim Jarmusch has a talented roster of actors at his disposal. Bill Murray, Adam Driver, and Tilda Swinton are just a few of the names that would rush to the director's beck and call if summoned. But this fact is not solely due to the director's uniquely wry vision and radiant cool, it's because Jarmusch has never taken the actor for granted. The relationship between the actor and the director is a collaboration as important, if not more important, than any other on set and some director's seem to forget just how hard the actor's job is. Not Jarmusch. He takes the time to sit down with the actor, recognize their needs, and identify how he can best serve them to get the type of performance they both crave.  It's true that over time he's built a shorthand with the actors he's worked with through multiple films (to the point he's even written dialogue with them specifically in mind) but at its root, the basis of their relationship remains the same. Respect. Respect seems to be the through line in our conversation today. Jim's latest film "The Dead Don't Die", is yes a zombie movie, but also a plea for humanity to begin respecting one another and the earth on which they call home. In it, the peaceful town of Centerville finds itself battling a zombie horde as the dead start rising from their graves: a result of reckless fracking which has thrown the planet off its axis. Even more so, it's evident how much Jarmusch, a true cinematic chameleon in his own right, respects the medium of film and would like emerging filmmakers to do the same. We talk the director's earliest influences, how music and sound effect every aspect of his production and how keeping empathy and an open mind are the two most important qualities a director can possess.
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20 min
June 14, 2019
06.14.19: Praising Chernobyl, "Burning Cane" and Taking a Stand Against Apple’s New Monitor
This week on The No Film School Podcast, our resident tech-expert Charles Haine and Editor-in-Chief George Edelman chat about a new HBO show everyone loves and what makes it such a must-watch, a teenager who won Tribeca with a movie he shot in three weeks, that Apple monitor that is driving people a little nuts, plus Charles' unique way of using his computer.
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33 min
June 7, 2019
06.07.2019: The Week of Panasonic's New Mirrorless Camera and Apple's New Cheese Grater
This week on the No Film School Podcast, Host Charles Haine and NFS Editor-in-Chief George Edelman talk tech. They discuss Apple's new Mac Pro, unveiled on Monday, which features a completely overhauled design, a massive 32-inch Retina 6K display, and internal specs that will certainly pique the interest of pros.
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32 min
June 3, 2019
The Ultimate Screenwriting Masterclass with John Fusco and Jon Fusco
Today is a very special episode of The No Film School Podcast and perhaps a momentous occasion in the history of the universe itself. The very balance of the cosmos hangs at a thread as Academy Award Nominated screenwriter John Fusco and former No Film School Producer Jon Fusco finally meet to discuss their craft. John Fusco is, of course, the legendary screenwriter who dropped out of high school at age 16 to travel the south as a blues musician before returning to the Northeast and attending Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. He later went on to write such hit films as Young Guns, Hidalgo, and most recently Netflilx's The Highway Men, which made its debut at 2019's edition of the SXSW film festival. The man has been writing films for over thirty years and has a wealth of knowledge to share with us all including practices on how to become disciplined (and stay that way), getting yourself into the screenwriting zone, and ways to retain control of your script once it hits the production stage.
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34 min
May 27, 2019
How to Build the Perfect Lookbook with Adam Egypt Mortimer
Adam Egypt Mortimer's latest feature, like many others currently on the festival circuit, is the result of an enormous amount of careful planning and obsessing over details. About thirty-two pages or so's worth to be precise. In pre-production for Daniel Isn't Real Mortimer created what he calls a "style guide", which is essentially a heavily detailed look book that breaks down every single aspect of production for the key members of his crew. This includes not only notes on how the film should look aesthetically, but also the reasoning behind the choice of gear for each shot and how each scene relates thematically to the broader arc of the story. The guide played an essential role in both keeping the crew on the same page and allowing key production members to keep Mortimer on track if they saw him straying from the mission. The mission, in this case, was to convey the harrowing story of a troubled college freshman named Luke who, after undergoing a violent family trauma, resurrects his childhood imaginary friend Daniel to help him cope. The film features a few young members of Hollywood royalty in it's cast with both Patrick Schwarzenneger and Miles Robbins playing the schizophrenic duo. NFS sat down with Mortimer for a case study of sorts back at SXSW. We discuss the process and components involved in creating the perfect look book, using his own work as a guide.
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31 min
May 23, 2019
5.23.19: Game of Thrones Ends, War Against ATA Rages On
The No Film School Podcast is a weekly show devoted to catching you up on all the notable things you may have missed while you were making films. Host Charles Haine and NFS Editor-in-Chief George Edelman discuss the myriad flaws and wonders of the ‘Game of Thrones’ finale (is Drogon smarter than we think?) and how Verve made a crucial move in the WGA vs. ATA battle. They also go over some exciting gear news: the MicroFogger blasting onto the scene, DJI taking on GoPro, and why normal-speed scenes in ‘Avengers: Endgame’ might be shot at 48 fps.
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29 min
May 20, 2019
Why You Should Experiment Early In Your Career: 'The Mountain'
If there's one universal truth about filmmaking, it's that it's hard as hell to get your picture made. So if you're going to go through all the trouble of making a movie, you better damn well make sure you're not scared to tell the story that you want to tell. Luckily, there's no better time to do this than at the very beginning. Rick Alverson is one of the most daring filmmakers on the planet. His latest film, The Mountain, is a surreal odyssey concerning the very heart of creativity itself: the mind. Or rather the antiquated science behind destroying it. In the film, Tye Sheridan plays a young man who after losing his mother, goes to work with a doctor, portrayed by the unhumanly charismatic Jeff Goldblum, who specializes in lobotomies. The timing of this film's release is no coincidence. While there may not be a literal blade held to our skull, every day we are subject to creative suppression from an overabundance of media, screens and pop culture. And while mainline cinema may do its best to further this narrative, Alverson argues that it's our duty as independent filmmakers to buck the trend and create art that leads to critical thinking. It's a truth that he learned some time along the middle of his career, that filmmaking should be about having a conversation with the medium and not a promotional exercise. Filmmakers should meditate on how they can contribute to the art form itself and not look for personal advancement. There is no better time to start this practice, than at the very beginning. NFS sat down with Alverson and Sheridan to discuss how filmmakers can look to achieve this very notion at SXSW.
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30 min
May 16, 2019
NFS 5.19.19: Game of Thrones Goes Heavy Metal, ARRI Goes to Charleston
The No Film School Podcast is a weekly show devoted to catching you up on all the notable things you may have missed while you were making films. Host Charles Haine and NFS Editor George Edelman dive into the latest Game of Thrones controversy (this week style and content are at war), Roger Deakins’ old-school, single-LUT methods and why ARRI is invading Charleston, North Carolina.
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30 min
May 13, 2019
How to Prove You Can Write With Just One Script - 'Big Time Adolescence' Director Jason Orley
Big Time Adolescence is a feature close to director Jason Orley's heart, and why shouldn't it be? In addition to making its world premiere at Sundance back in January, the film has the unique distinction of being the first screenplay he ever wrote. It's not often that the first thing you write ends up being your first feature. But the fact that this is Orley's first feature is not from lack of trying. In the process of achieving this seemingly unachievable feat, Orley penned multiple scripts with the goal of "proving he could write." A few of them, including Big Time Adolescence ended up on The Black List. And if you don't know what The Black List is, it's time to get familiar, because it's an accolade that could end up changing your screenwriting career forever. That's what ended up happening for Orley in any case. Adolescence tells the story suburban teenager comes of age under the destructive guidance of his best friend, an aimless college dropout. That dropout is played by none other than Saturday Night Live standout Pete Davidson, who in addition to joining the film as an executive producer, turns in a star-confirming performance. NFS sat down with Orley at Sundance to discuss the basics of writing to prove you can write, what The Black List can do for your career, using the star of your film as your greatest collaborator and more.
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17 min
May 6, 2019
How to One-Man-Crew it like an Olympian
For his new film Olympic Dreams, filmmaker Jeremy Teicher was granted unprecedented access to one of the most exclusive residences in the world. This is a location so rare that it's only available once every four years. A place where pheromones course through the veins of some of the most beautiful and physically talented people alive: The Olympic Village. Teicher and his partner Alexi Pappas were provided a grant and, perhaps equally valuable, permission to shoot anywhere they wished at 2018's Winter Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. Pappas, an Olympic track star in her own right, stars in the film with the always hilarious Nick Kroll. The two are the only actual actors in the film, playing a young cross-country skier and a volunteer doctor that fall in love over the course of the winter games. Everyone else who appears in the film is either a competing Olympian or unknowing passerby. For this reason, it was crucial the production had the smallest footprint it could possibly get away with. The opportunity wouldn't be without its challenges, however. Namely, Teicher would be shooting an entire narrative film in a chaotic foreign location, entirely by himself. NFS sat down with Teicher and Pappas to discuss the most important parts of one man crewing, what gear to bring along, how to make things easier for yourself in pre-production and, at the end of the day, why it may be a better idea to bring at least one other person along to help.
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24 min
May 2, 2019
NFS 5.2.19: The Long Night is Over
Introducing the No Film School Podcast a weekly show devoted to catching you up on all the notable things you may have missed while you were making films. Host Charles Haine dives into the current state of the WGA - ATA conflict, discusses the perceived darkness of the most recent episode of Game of Thrones, and gives us some insight into a new LED cube light.
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24 min
April 29, 2019
How to Ensure You are Taking Advantage of the Democratization of Film
Mariam Webster defines "democratization" as to make (something) available to all people: to make it possible for all people to understand (something). So when we talk the democratization of filmmaking, in a way we're talking about the evolution of filmmaking itself.  Over the past decade or so we have seen some radical changes in both the type of video content that is being created and the industry at large. Not only are filmmaking tools growing more sophisticated, they are becoming cheaper to access as well.  What's more, the language of film itself has seemingly been instilled in the minds of new generations of creators who have grown up with the social media platforms like Instagram, Vine and TikTok. These creators are learning to edit and tell stories, whether that's their intention or not. At SXSW, NFS led a panel featuring Instagram Co-Founder Mike Krieger, KitSplit Co-Founder Lisbeth Kaufman, and Frame.io Founder Emery Wells. We discussed how each of their platforms has contributed to the democratization of filmmaking, what the revolution means to them and how emerging filmmakers should be taking advantage.
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49 min
April 22, 2019
How to Subversively Film a Politically Subversive Film
Barry Jenkins once said, "Art is inherently political. Even trying to make a film that has nothing to do with politics is, in and of itself, a political act." Unfortunately for filmmakers, not everyone these days will jump at the chance to see a movie that advertises its own inherently political nature. So how do you subvert an audience's expectations with a film like The Wall of Mexico? The title itself implies one of the most controversial issues facing the United States of America today. Directors Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak would say that the first step lies in staying ahead of the audience. How do you stay ahead of an audience expecting a social issues movie? Don't write a movie explicitly about social issues. That's exactly what the directing partners did with their SXSW standout. The film is heavy on magical realism and doesn't beat the audience over the head with any one single message. As Colter and Zyzak put it, ambiguity is a part of their artistic creed. And it's one that benefits the social issues genre greatly. In what is a subversive plot in and of itself, The Wall of Mexico tells the story of a wealthy Mexican family who decides to build a wall around their ranch to stop American townspeople from stealing their well water. I sat down with the cast and directors to discuss the art and importance of subtlety and messing with audience expectations.
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23 min
April 15, 2019
Why Writing and Directing Comedy Go Hand in Hand: Will Forte & 'Extra Ordinary'
Will Forte never met Mike Ahern or Enda Loughman before jumping on board the pair of Irish director's debut feature. He didn't need to. The script for Extra Ordinary was just that good. All he needed to know was that they'd be directing. Why? Because according to Forte, in comedy, writing and directing go hand in hand. In that respect, writing and acting may go hand in hand as well. While Forte and scene partner Claudia O'Doherty may bring some star power to the project, it's the relatively unknown comedian Maeve Higgins who truly carries the brunt of the project on her shoulders. And as we learned in this interview, she had a hand in writing the film as well. Higgins plays Rose, a sweet, lonely driving instructor in rural Ireland, who is gifted with supernatural abilities. Rose has a love/hate relationship with her 'talents' & tries to ignore the constant spirit requests from locals - to exorcize possessed rubbish bins or haunted gravel. Forte plays a washed-up pop star/satanist in his usual outlandish manner, O'Doherty his indifferent wife. Also joining us on the show is actor Barry Ward, Roses' love interest in the film. We sat down after the film's premiere at SXSW to discuss trusting actors to write, the advantages of comedy jamming with directors and "funnying" your way out of any problematic situations.
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19 min
April 8, 2019
How to Make a Coming of Age Movie that Doesn't Suck: Ninian Doff on 'Boyz in the Wood'
Making a coming of age film can be a tricky thing. There's a delicate line between teenagers keepin' it real and overly nostalgic reminiscing. Even though it's his first feature, it's clear that Ninian Doff will never have a problem toeing that line and is truly a master of keepin' it real. SXSW Midnight standout Boyz in the Wood follows a group of kids as they set off deep in the Scottish Highlands, as part of a camping program for troubled youth. As they push through the wilderness they encounter everything from rap-loving farmers to hallucinogenic rabbit shits. What really sets the film apart from the traditional coming of age story, however, is its strong influence from hip hop culture. This might be obvious from a film whose title so closely resembles John Singleton's 1991 classic, but Ninian Doff's film is about as contemporary in tone as you can possibly get. While it's his debut film, the director made a name for himself in his music video collaborations with acts like Run the Jewels, and his past work is clearly seen in the frenetic graphics, a pulsating soundtrack and blitzkrieg action that pervade through the feature. We sat down with Doff and his cast of boyz soon after their opening night premiere at SXSW to talk about shooting a film that's 95 percent exteriors, building trust with young actors and how to make a coming of age film that doesn't suck.
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34 min
April 1, 2019
Masturbation on Film: Karen Maine, Natalia Dyer & More on SXSW Standout 'Yes, God, Yes'
This week on the No Film School Podcast, we’re going to talk about one of the most largely undiscussed nuances of filmmaking: the portrayal of masturbation on film. Specifically, of the female kind. 'Yes, God, Yes' is a film unlike any you’ve seen before. In it, a Catholic teenager in the early aughts discovers masturbating and struggles to suppress her new urges on a religious retreat. But this ain’t no American Pie satire. Writer/Director Karen Maine (who you may know as half of the writing team from 2014’s indie hit 'Obvious Child') truly brings us inside the mind of female adolescence. Much of this ability is due to the fact that she lived through this experience as a teen herself. As I learned when I sat down with Maine and her cast at SXSW earlier this month, however, it was the director’s openness to collaborate with her talented young leads that truly sealed the deal. The cast is led by a standout performance from Natalia Dyer, who shows she clearly deserves more complex roles than the likes of 'Stranger Things'’ archetypal Nancy Wheeler provides her. Dyer joins us on the show today, along with Timothy Simons (perhaps best known for his role as Jonah Ryan from 'Veep'), and talented new comers Francesca Reale, Alisha Boe and Wolfgang Novogratz. We talk about building an atmosphere on set comfortable enough to to avoid the pitfalls of the typical coming of age story and masturbation, lots of masturbation.
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22 min
March 11, 2019
'Don't be Afraid if You Didn't Go To Film School': The Method to Success Behind 'Greener Grass'
Greener Grass is a project that has been on a whirlwind path to success since the very beginning. Directors Jocelyn DeBoer and Dawn Luebbe's first iteration of the surreal comedy turned heads as a short film back in 2016, when it won awards at major festivals like SXSW and the Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival in France. Upon its release online, it also achieved viral status and earned distinctions from Short of the Week and Vimeo. It's rare that a short finds success like that both on the festival circuit and online, but hey, when you watch Greener Grass, it's easy to see why. Though they claim to have had no intention of doing so initially, the duo expanded the short into a feature film which hit Sundance in a big way back in January. The film's meticulously crafted aesthetic places it on a level somewhere between Adult Swim and David Lynch. With the aid of talented production designers, costume designers, and a brilliantly specific script, DeBoer and Luebbe's film brings us into a candy-coated utopia that we've never seen the likes of in film before. Of course, things descend into dystopia by the time the film's through. Suburban tensions reach their boiling point after one mom willingly gives up her daughter to a friend, who I might add later goes on to give birth to a bouncing baby soccer ball. Things get weird. But not odd enough to sway IFC Midnight from purchasing the film earlier this week, or SXSW programming it into their festival to be seen in Austin later this week. Jon Fusco sat down with the directors and producer Natalie Metzger at Sundance this year to talk about using characters to build a world, hiring geniuses as collaborators and more.
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29 min
March 4, 2019
'There's No Business Like Slow Business': Lee Cronin on His Path to Horror Glory
For Lee Cronin, getting to the point where he could make his debut feature "The Hole in The Ground" was like climbing a greasy pole. For every step he took upwards it always seemed like he’d have to slip down a bit as well. His three horror shorts helped to boost his leverage, especially the 2014 award winner "Ghost Train", but none seemed to elevate him to a point where he could leave commercial work behind and commit to a career as a feature filmmaker. As the director so aptly puts it in our interview today, “there’s no business like slow business.” Something in the air has seemingly changed this year, however, as that process has transformed into something like a “slow rocket.” After years of struggling, The Hole in the Ground is set for a March 1st release, by none other than family horror distributor extraordinaire, A24. The film, which made its premiere at Sundance in January, follows a woman who moves to a new town with her young son in order to escape a life of domestic abuse, only to encounter an ominous sinkhole that appears to have supernatural powers which threaten the life of her child. We sat down in Park City to discuss how horror filmmakers can follow a similar path to success by staying steady on their own course without giving up. And perhaps more importantly, Cronin gives tips on how to stay positive during the grueling journey ahead.
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24 min
February 25, 2019
How Young Filmmakers Can Take Advantage of Fellowships
Some filmmakers get their starts late, and some filmmakers get their starts early. Our guests on today’s roundtable fall under the latter. Since 2015, Sundance and Adobe have held the Sundance Ignite Fellowship a year long program for 18-to-25-year-old emerging filmmakers from around the world. Their fellowship kicks off with a free trip to the Sundance Film Festival, where they are paired with a Sundance mentor and attend special Sundance Ignite events that advance their films and careers. For the rest of the year, the fellows will work with their mentors, attend select Sundance Institute programs, enjoy eligibility for internships, and receive additional creative and professional development opportunities as they develop their craft. The fellows also receive a complimentary subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud,and lets not also forget that they have a pretty sweet shot at getting their films into Sundance at some point in their burgeoning careers. Joining us today are four short filmmakers who did just that: Matthew Puccini and Tyler Rabinowitz with Lavender; Crystal Kayiza with Edgecombe; and Vasilis Kekatos with The silence of dying fish. Together with mentor Lacey Schwartz we talk about the benefits of fellowships like the Ignite Program for young filmmakers and how you can be accepted to opportunities like this yourself.
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38 min
February 18, 2019
DIAY: Do It ALL Yourself with Director Johannes Nyholhm
Johannes Nyholm, director of Sundance standout Koko-Di Koko-Da takes the whole wearing many hats thing to a whole other dimension. If you're looking for a filmmaker who has complete command over his material, then look no further than this Swedish auteur. It would take too long to list all of his credits on this film, but how about Writer, Director, Producer, Editor, Colorist, VFX Artist, and Shadow Puppet Designer/Performer for a start? Nyholm is a great believer in the "Do It Yourself" ideology and through years of hard work, he has truly taught himself the tools necessary to put it into practice. What he may have an even better knack for, however, is when to step away and let his collaborators take the wheel. It's both of these abilities combined that have garnered him a successful career in the film industry. His latest film Koko-Di Koko-Da follows a couple that goes on a camping trip to find their way back to each other, only to be haunted by a sideshow artist and his shady entourage who emerge from the woods and terrorize them, luring them deeper into a maelstrom of psychological terror and humiliating slapstick. Nyholm joins us on The No Film School Podcast today to discuss why working with a smaller team can be smarter than working with a large one, growing your cinematic tool kit and more.
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23 min
February 11, 2019
How To Put Yourself in the Room: Sundance Breakout ‘Them That Follow’
“In the rugged wilderness of Appalachia, the members of an isolated community of Pentecostal snake handlers led by Pastor Lemuel risk their lives to attest themselves before God.” This is a much different type of log-line than the others entries you’d find scrolling down the list of Dramatic Competition entries in Sundance’s program. It is the plot of Them That Follow, the feature film debut for writer/directors Britt Poulton and Dan Madison Savage and boy, is it a doozy. Though they didn’t have any directing credits prior to the film’s premiere, the duo had more than enough experience between them to pull off the gripping narrative. Through years of working for other studios and other directors they found themselves with the opportunity to "get in the room.” What is the room? Well and not to use a cliche lightly here, but, “the answer may surprise you.” We also talk through writing a story about a secretive community with limited access, filling in the blanks with your own personal experiences and working with an incredible cast that included Olivia Coleman, Walton Goggins, Jim Gaffigan and more.
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25 min
February 4, 2019
How to Become a Sundance Worthy Documentary Cinematographer
The documentary cinematographer is a special kind of cinematographer. Whereas in narrative, the role is more defined, DP’s of the more truthful persuasion may find themselves piling on more hats than their fiction bound counterparts. Take it from David Paul Jacobson of Ask Dr. Ruth and Kristy Tully of Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins, two Sundance caliber cinematographers who join us on today’s show. Both of their projects revolve around strong women. Ask Dr. Ruth chronicles the incredible life of Dr. Ruth Wertheimer, a Holocaust survivor, former soldier, immigrant and two-time divorcee who became the world’s most influential sex therapist. Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins memorializes the former journalist who made a name for herself as rough talkin’ six foot Texan who was quick to expose corruption wherever she found it. Together in this roundtable we talk about how to grab the most effective b-roll, the perfect kits for the job, and not overstepping boundaries with directors and editors as you must also direct and edit yourself.
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36 min
January 31, 2019
Does This Year's Sundance Signal the Death of Truly Independent Film? NFS Live Pt.2
Emily Buder, Erik Luers, George Edelman, Ryan Koo and Jon Fusco are all together again in Park City to give you a rundown of everything that happened at the Sundance Film Festival in 2019. It's been a crazy week full of screenings, interviews, and generally just trying to stay alive, so you best believe they've got more than a few hot takes to throw your way. In addition to sharing their favorite films and what they're sad they missed, the team identifies a few trends that could end up re-shaping the future of the industry. This is Part 2 of No Film School's live audio coverage from Sundance 2019.
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53 min
January 28, 2019
No Film School Live from Sundance 2019 Pt.1
Taking its rightful place at the very beginning of the 2019 festival circuit, the Sundance Film Festival is often an unpredictable beast. But Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and George Edelman are live from Park City, Utah to try and make some sense of it all for you. In this special episode of The No Film School Podcast, they take an early stab at predicting what features end up as festival favorites, run down some of their most anticipated films and share some insights on how to survive the 2-week orgy of independent film.
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45 min
January 21, 2019
Best of the 2018 No Film School Podcast Interviews, Part 3
It's not all about big names and big projects here on the No Film School Podcast. Some of our best conversations take place with artists who are just starting to find their way in the world. Really, all of should be able to relate to these guests on a deeper level since we hear problems that many of us are still struggling with as we make our own way through the industry. On today's, final installment of the best of the No Film School Podcast we'll take a look back at some of these conversations and trace through what it can cost to make a film. Whether it be a short or a feature, documentary or narrative, you're bound to walk away with some advice that will be of aid on your future projects.
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70 min
January 14, 2019
Best of the 2018 No Film School Podcast Interviews, Part 2
We had some of the biggest directors of the year on the show in 2018 and this batch of best ofs proves it. Yorogs Lanthimos, Debra Granik, Jeremy Saulnier, and the legendary Mike Leigh all make an appearance as does Denis Villeneuve and Steve McQueen's go-to-editor, Joe Walker.
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63 min
January 10, 2019
IFW 1.10.19: The Final Episode
Liz Nord, Erik Luers, Charles Haine and (kind of) Jon Fusco are all together for the last time on this special, final episode of our long-running independent film news series Indie Film Weekly. There are three years worth of huge industry and gear stories to remember, but on this show, we identify a few that stand out that will forever change the future of filmmaking. We look back at some of our favorite films and directors from the show's lifetime, as well as a few movies that we're most excited to see in 2019. Finally, we share the best advice we could possibly think of and try to finally answer that perennial question once and for all: is going to film school really worth it?
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64 min
January 7, 2019
Best of the 2018 No Film School Podcast Interviews, Part 1
Depending on what stage of your career you’re at, you can learn as much from someone who's gotten a couple shorts into some major festivals as you can from a director like Yorgos Lanthimos. It’s in this realization where The No Film School Podcast really shines. For that reason, we treat our guests with the same level of respect across all boards, no matter who they are or how prestigious their film may be. Let’s face it, we are all filmmakers who have made, or are trying to make movies under difficult circumstances. And one of the best ways to learn how to do that is by listening to the stories of those who have struggled through both success and failure. For a true artist both experiences hold immense value. Our countdown this year features just as many big names as it does incredible advice. Over the next three weeks, you’ll hear from the likes of Lanthimos, Jeremy Saulnier, Mike Leigh, Steve Yeun, Debra Granik and more. I’ll be leading you through some of our best clips of 2018, so if you haven’t heard all of our interview podcasts, these episodes will be a great overview of those pearls of advice that may end up helping you down the road. This week's features guests Claudette Godfrey (SXSW Programmer), Jim Cummings (Thunder Road), Kirsten Lepore (Hi Stranger), Daniel Kwan & Daniel Scheinert (DANIELS) and Sam Morill (Vimeo).
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60 min
December 20, 2018
IFW 12.20.18: Indie Film Weekly Will Come to an End in 2019
It is with a heavy heart that today we are announcing that Indie Film Weekly will be entering an indefinite hiatus in 2019. We will have one final show airing Thursday, January 9th with the whole gang back together for the last time. There is a distinct possibility that the show will return in some form later on, but for now, it’s time to say goodbye.
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2 min
December 13, 2018
IFW 12.13.18: How to Build Relationships in the Biz & 2018's Biggest Box Office Draw
Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Liz Nord are back together for the final show of 2018. It was an amazing year for film, but a recent study found that there was one key ingredient for the biggest box office successes. And yes, that ingredient may surprise you. Plus how MoviePass may be making a come back and the Oscars are off to a horrible start. Charles Haine joins us for gear news where he breaks down what's been a busy month in codec. On Ask No Film School - how do you build your filmmaking network online? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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47 min
December 10, 2018
Why the Bolex is the World’s Most Beloved Camera
Filmmaker Alyssa Bolsey didn’t discover until she was in film school herself that her great-grandfather had invented the iconic Bolex 16mm camera. She spent the next decade-plus researching her enigmatic ancestor and interviewing several influential filmmakers who used his cameras, including Barbara Hammer, Wim Wenders, and Jonas Mekas, for a film called BEYOND THE BOLEX. Bolsey and the film’s producer and DP, Camilo Lara Jr., join No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss why the Bolex is such an enduring and beloved camera that is still used today.
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43 min
December 6, 2018
IFW 12.6.18: Sundance Selections & Our Full Review of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
Sundance's own Liz Nord joins the show to give Jon Fusco and Erik Luers the down and dirty on all Sundance's Feature and Shorts selections for 2019 and what they could mean for future filmmakers. Plus what Lars Von Trier has done to upset the entire MPAA. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where he gives us his full thoughts on Blackmagic's new Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. In what was a busy week for cameras, he also previews a new RED camera that will be hitting rental houses and stores shortly. On Ask No Film School - do you really need a follow focus anymore? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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43 min
December 3, 2018
Making the Move from Producer to Director: Cristina Gallego on 'Birds of Passage'
While Cristina Gallego was busy working as a producer on her partner Ciro Guerra's magnificent film "Embrace of the Serpent", she caught wind of a story from one of the many indigenous non-actors onset. That story was one that perhaps many of us have heard before, a Colombian man finds partners in America that he can sell drugs to, becomes fantastically wealthy and ends up abandoning his morals as a result. Except "Birds of Passage" is so much more. With Gallego and Guerra at the helm, we get a glimpse at a side of this much-glamorized Narcos-era that we've never seen before. The film presents the narrative from an indigenous Colombian perspective, full of magical realism steering from traditions that go back hundreds of years and is perhaps the most authentic story concerning its subject matter of all time. Think of it as a thrilling mixture of The Godfather and One Hundred Years of Solitude, where we watch the entire history of two families whose native ways are slowly brought to a halt as they engage in the burgeoning drug trafficking business. Eventually, it brings a war to control the business that ends up destroying both their lives and their culture. There is no other pair of directors in the world that could've told this story, and for her part, Gallego switched from a lifetime of producing to the role of co-director in order to more clearly communicate her vision. I sat down with her at TIFF to talk about what that transition was like, working with Ciro Guerra, and finding the stories that stem from your own history.
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29 min
November 29, 2018
IFW 11.29.18: The First Film Awards of the Season & How to Shoot Safe Sex
Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Liz Nord are here to catch you up on all the stuff you missed while in a tryptophan coma last week. Believe it or not, awards season has officially begun and we have a full report on what could be the year's top contenders. Plus the perennial riddle of how to best shoot sex on film may be closer to being solved. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where he discusses some rumors surrounding new cameras from Canon and Sony. On Ask No Film School - what program should you use for editing on an older computer? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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48 min
November 26, 2018
Yorgos Lanthimos on How to Shoot Surrealist Film
If you've seen any of Yorgos Lanthimos' films, then you know the Greek director isn't afraid to put anything on the screen. Like many famous surrealists, Lanthimos isn't interested in exploring stories where things go right, he wants his audience to see what's wrong in the world. To him, nothing is off limits and any dark side of the human psyche is worth exploring. In surrealist film, any image can be too much or too little. It's a delicate balance, but one that Lanthimos has truly mastered with his latest film The Favourite. A period piece set in early 18th century England, a frail Queen Anne Olivia Colman, occupies the throne and her close friend Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) governs the country in her stead. When a new servant Abigail (Emma Stone) arrives, however, her charm endears her to Sarah and a competition to be the queens favorite emerges. In this interview, Lanthimos is joined by screenwriter Tony McNamara to discuss how commercial work early in his career ended up steering him in the complete opposite direction, not conforming to filmic norms, and breaking every possible rule you can.
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25 min
November 22, 2018
IFW 11.22.18: A Thanksgiving Miracle & Are Big Changes Coming for Final Cut?
Jon Fusco and Erik Luers are stranded together in Brooklyn for yet another turkey day, but a major announcement from The Criterion Collection has given them plenty to be thankful for. On the other side of the coin, we take a moment to remember one of the greatest American screenwriters of all time. Charles Haine joins us for gear news where big changes may soon be coming for Final Cut users and on Ask No Film School - how do you avoid casting shadows when setting up your lights? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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45 min
November 19, 2018
Academy Award Winner László Nemes on Following Your Inspiration to Success
How we approach history and how we approach film are very similar. As László Nemes puts it, history doesn’t work the way we think it works, we think we know more about these events in our past, but there’s no way of ever knowing firsthand what the atmosphere at the time actually was. In much the same way, we can lean on popular conceptions of the way films should be made or we can question the existing language of cinema and follow our own inspiration. The truth is, you don’t have to start from ground zero. As a filmmaker, you are already taking in an enormous amount of influences, every single day. Cinema is about your adventure. It’s not about what someone tells you will work. Nemes has followed his own guiding light, despite going to film school, on every project he’s ever made. History is his muse, but his style comes from a curriculum which he’s curated himself. This is something you can do too. Nemes’ debut feature Son of Saul earned him an Academy Award, a BAFTA, several grand jury prizes at Cannes, and dozens more. His latest film, Sunset, features a stunning performance from Juli Jakab as a young milliner in Budapest before World War I, whose bent on finding out how her family lost control of their prized hat store. I sat down with both Names and Jakab at TIFF where we discussed making period films thrilling, ignoring your film school teachings and much more.
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28 min
November 15, 2018
IFW 11.15.18: Our Favorite Books on Cinema & The Death of a Real-Life Superhero
Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Liz Nord are here to recap what was a truly insane week in the world, even in the film industry. They discuss an unexpected loss in the epicenter of cinema as fires continue to rage through Southern California and say goodbye to one of the world's greatest storytellers - Stan Lee. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where he reveals a major acquisition from Teradek, new features from Nikon and why RED's much-hyped Hydrogen may end up a major disappointment. On Ask No Film School, we give recommendations on a few books to check out on cinematic technique. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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43 min
November 12, 2018
Mike Leigh on How to Become Your Actor's Dream Director
Working with Mike Leigh is what you would call an actor’s dream true. Since his debut in 1972, the seventy-five-year-old legendary British director has made twenty films and consistently refined his craft to fit a process where the collaboration with actors is paramount. This is due in part to his own experiences at acting school in the 60’s, where he felt confined by rigid Shakespearian premeditation and hostile attitudes towards experimentation. Perhaps his only rule now is that he must discover what his film is through the making of it. This starts with the actors and in effect, it begins as early as the audition process. Here he negates modern methods, instead opting for one on one improvisations with those going out for the part. Later these improvisations will become the basis for building scenes throughout the production and as a result, they are stacked one upon the other to build a narrative. We sat down with Leigh at TIFF this year, where his latest film Peterloo made its North American premiere. We nail down his process with actors, from audition to production and confronting your own status quo by challenging yourself as a filmmaker with every new film make. The advice he gives is invaluable.
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23 min
November 8, 2018
IFW 11.8.18: The Greatest Foreign Films of All Time & How Much You Should Be Asking for Upfront?
Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Liz Nord are here this week to reveal a few of their favorites from what BBC has labeled their one hundred greatest foreign films of all time. Is your favorite on the list? Plus should "A Star is Born" really come with a trigger warning? Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where we talk Aputure's new venture into sound with Deity microphones and a new cage that actually may be worth checking out. On Ask No Film School - how much should you ask to be paid up front for a new gig? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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46 min
November 5, 2018
'Diamantino': How to Make a Masterpiece Out of Your Mistakes
For co-directors Daniel Schmidt and Gabriel Abrantes, the making of Diamantino was just as, if not more complex, than the award-winning film's insane plot. It tells the story of Diamantino, the world's premier soccer star, who loses his special touch and ends his career in disgrace. Searching for a new purpose, the international icon sets on a delirious odyssey where he confronts neo-fascism, the refugee crisis, genetic modification, and the hunt for the source of genius. That's a whole lot of ground to cover within the confines of an hour and a half, and after seeing the first assembly of their cut, the duo was dismayed and ready to throw in the towel. Even during production, Schmidt felt as if they had bit off a little more than they could chew. Unhappy, they walked away from the project and decided to regroup at a later date. Ultimately, they came to realize that they still had a fair amount of interesting material they felt they could work with and that their failures could, through the magic of post-production, be turned into an avante-garde tour de force. Using stock imagery, frenetic archival footage and green screen wizardry they spliced together a cut worthy of Cannes, New York Film Festival, The Toronto International Film Festival and more. We sat down with Schmidt prior to Diamantino's screening at TIFF and talked about adapting to difficult circumstances, learning from mistakes, and never giving up hope on your vision.
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34 min
November 1, 2018
IFW 11.1.18: Farewell FilmStruck & Is Apple Finally Filmmaker Friendly?
Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Liz Nord are back together again, this time to mourn the loss of yet another brilliant streaming service. But while our home options dwindle, box offices around the country continue to put up big numbers. So much so that Alamo Drafthouse has given its employees half a day off...for a much-needed reason. Charles Haine joins us for gear news fresh off Apple's big event in Brooklyn where they announced a new MacBook Air and more products designed with the intention of enticing filmmakers. Are they worth the plunge? In Ask No Film School - surefire methods to achieve hard and soft qualities of light. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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51 min
October 29, 2018
For Paycheck or For Passion? Steven Yeun on 'Burning', 'Sorry to Bother You' and Building a Career
It's hard to coin Steven Yeun's year as "breakthrough" since the South Korean actor has been a figure in the public's eye since his first appearance as Glenn from AMC's The Walking Dead in 2010. But with starring roles in both Boots Riley's Sorry to Bother You and Chang Dong Lee's Burning in 2018, he has all but cemented himself as a leading man on the independent film scene. It's been a long road to get to this point. In the years between the role that made him famous and now, Yeun found himself on set feeling more like a placeholder than an actual human being. In the end, he found that growth stems from self-motivation. For him, this meant taking on meatier projects and ignoring those that were nothing more than a nice paycheck.
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25 min
October 25, 2018
IFW 10.25.18: Our Thoughts on the New MacBook Pro & Where to Submit Your Film Online
Jon Fusco is back this week with Liz Nord to lead you through the fallout of Withoutabox's shut down and what it could mean for your project. Plus, in what was a busy week on the internet, they discuss new financial opportunities for educational YouTubers and the demise of one of our favorite video platforms. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where he reveals his long-awaited opinion on the 2018 MacBook and if its an improved product for the aspiring filmmaker. On Ask No Film School - how do you calculate the amount of data storage you'll need for your film? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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42 min
October 22, 2018
Why You Should Edit Your Own Films
Irene Lusztig (‘Yours in Sisterhood’) and Dominic Gagnon (‘Going South’)—two filmmakers who edit their own films—join No Film School’s Liz Nord to make the case for editing your own work by sharing their processes and how they make the many decisions that go into an edit.
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44 min
October 18, 2018
IFW 10.18.18: Why 2018 Has Been a Great Year for Movies & Where to Move if You Want to Make One
Erik Luers and Liz Nord are together again to discuss the state of the movie industry as we near the end of 2018 and how it could lead to a downward trend we'd all be happy to see take place. Plus there may be a new place on the map to move if you want to make movies, and it's not New York or LA. Charles Haine joins us for gear news and dishes on not one, not two, but twelve new lenses you may want to keep an eye on. In Ask No Film School - how the hell do you get a documentary funded anyway? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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38 min
October 15, 2018
One Hundred Different Ways to Get Your Film Funded
Hayley Pappas (Head of RYOT Films), Caroline von Kuhn (Director of Artist Development at SFFILM), and Leah Giblin (Head of Grants at Cinereach) are responsible for getting millions of dollars to independent filmmakers each year through grants and financing. They join No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss the many ways independent films are being funded today, and how you can access these various funding sources for your films.
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56 min
October 11, 2018
IFW 10.11.18: Your Favorite Filmmakers Defined & A New Mirrorless Camera from Fuji
Erik Luers, and Liz Nord get together this week to discuss two of their favorite things: movies and words. They also address some pretty spooky rumors that George Romero may soon be rising from the dead. Charles Haine joins them to discuss a new camera from his favorite camera company as well as new software from Mocha, Pomfort and Baselight that may end up greatly enhancing your workflow. And in Ask No Film School - what kind of background audio can you use in your short? As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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40 min
October 8, 2018
How to Become a Top Notch Sound Designer with the Team Behind 'First Man'
Not many people with an interest in film have the direction to start pursuing sound at an early point in their career. It seems, rather, that through working on various projects they come to realize how powerful a tool sound really is and fall head over heels in love. If it's early enough in their career, there's plenty of work to be found and no turning back. For Milly Iatrou Morgan and Ai-Ling Lee, this was certainly the case. All it took was a simple choice followed by years of dedication to find their way as two of the biggest sound designers in the industry today. Their latest collaboration is Damien Chazelle's 'First Man', one of the biggest movies of the year in both popularity and scale. The film, which tells the story of Neil Armstrong's ascent to the moon, is densely layered with filmic tricks that when combined together create a wholly immersive experience for the audience. And while much fuss has been made over the project's expansive visuals, it would truly be nothing without the genius sound work of these two individuals. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with the pair at TIFF to discuss how they first decided to enter the business, gathering libraries of sound over the years and their collaboration in post with director and composer on what will surely go down in history as one of cinema's greatest space stories.
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37 min
October 4, 2018
IFW 10.4.18: When to Move On to Freelancing & Why You Should Be Playing Video Games
Jon Fusco and Erik Luers buckle down and get serious this week to discuss one of the single biggest hacking controversies of our generation and what it could mean for Marvel's box office returns. There will only be one group of people to blame if Venom flops this weekend, and it's Lady Gaga fans. Also in the news, do people who play video games for ten hours or more a week somehow end up having more disposable income? Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where he details RED's massive new monochrome sensor and a new monitor that'll have you drooling. In Ask No Film School, he ponders whether living life as a freelancer is absolutely essential for directors looking to breakthrough. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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42 min
October 1, 2018
Jeremy Saulnier on Why Being a DP is More Fun than Being a Director
Jeremy Saulnier has carved out his own little place in film history. His second feature film Blue Ruin was the first of its kind in many ways, an artful genre thriller that is a spectacle to behold and shot on a shoestring budget. His next film, Green Room, cemented his place as one of today's most talented thriller auteurs. And it all stems back from blowing shit up as an eight-year-old in his backyard. There wasn't really a time when Saulnier's life didn't revolve around the camera. From making zombie flicks as a teen to starting a film collective in high school to making his way up the film ladder as a cinematographer, his experiences have been a constant education on the ways of film. And while he swears his days as a DP were "more fun", his artful visual touch is still very much present as a director. The latest film on his resume, the Netflix produced Hold The Dark, is further evidence of his unique ability to tell suspenseful stories from behind the lens of a camera. In it, Jeffery Wright plays a writer named Russel Core who, after the deaths of three children suspected to be killed by wolves, is hired by the mother of a missing six-year-old boy to track down and locate their son in the Alaskan wilderness. I sat down with Saulnier to discuss getting your hands dirty on production, keeping that enthusiasm going, and not being afraid to ask for what your narrative demands.
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23 min
September 27, 2018
IFW 9.27.18: How to Correctly Use a Fish & A New Mirrorless Camera From Panasonic?
It seems like the Toronto International Film Festival just wrapped up but Jon Fusco, Erik Luers and Liz Nord are all back together this week to preview the Fall's next big one, The 56th Annual New York Film Festival. The team drops some clues on what to look out for in addition to highlighting their most anticipated films at the fest. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, where Panasonic shocked the camera world with yet another full-frame mirrorless camera that may end up competing with their very own GH5. And on Ask No Film School, the crucial matter of handling animals on film is addressed. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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39 min
September 24, 2018
From Film School 'Failure' to Godard's Cinematographer: Fabrice Aragno on Working with Jean-Luc
When Fabrice Aragno went to film school, he was written off as a creator of meaningless images. What was the point of his thesis picture? Where was the emotion? These questions, however, didn't matter much to him, so he ignored them. What mattered was assembling work that he felt was sincere. In Aragno's opinion, cinema doesn't need an explanation. There is no objective. Don't explain it, just embrace it. Fortunately, that philosophy ended up aligning closely with another filmmaker some of you may have heard of - a man named Jean Luc Godard. Admittedly, Aragno wasn't terribly influenced by the French New Wave master's work. As a student, he was more interested in Felinni and others associated with Italian Neo-Realism. So when he got a phone call asking if he'd like to work with Godard on "Goodbye to Language", he was nervous to meet with the director who had a reputation of being obstinately difficult to work with. Yet when they met, he found the mythic figure to be just a man, a man who would soon become a collaborator. Their most recent film "The Image Book" picks up where "Goodbye to Language" left off. It is a collage of sound and picture that may be better described as a cinematic experience than a movie. NFS Producer Jon Fusco down with Aragno, who edited and shot the film (which conversely features mostly found footage) at the Toronto International Film festival. Listening to this interview is a bit like watching the film itself. Aragno weaves in and out of the French language, jumps around topics, and drops many obscure references as we talk about the genesis of their collaboration and gain fascinating insights into Jean Luc Godard's creative process.
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35 min
September 20, 2018
IFW 9.20.18: Two of the Years Biggest Cameras & How to Advertise Your Short Film
In this episode, Jon Fusco and Erik Luers talk TIFF takeaways, a successor to MoviePass that could actually work out and the Emmys' failures to get with the times. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, talking two of the biggest mirrorless cameras to come out this year and an exciting new pair of Cooke lenses. On Ask No Film School - some thoughts on how advertising could end up hurting your short film. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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49 min
September 17, 2018
'Think Slow, Act Fast': Joe Walker on Editing for Steve McQueen and Denis Villeneuve
Steve McQueen has made some great movies. So has Denis Villeneuve. So what do Hunger, Sicario, Shame, Blade Runner 2049, 12 Years a Slave and Arrival have in common? They were all edited by Joe Walker. McQueen and Walker's latest collaboration, Widows, made its world premiere to a sold-out crowd at the Toronto International Film Festival last week. It's the Academy Award winner's most accessible feature, a blockbuster heist movie with a stellar cast including Viola Davis, Liam Neeson, Colin Farrell, Daniel Kaluya and Elizabeth Dobecki. It's almost a certainty that McQueen and Walker will have another hit on their hands upon the film's wide release this Fall. In an interview with No Film School Producer Jon Fusco, Joe Walker breaks down the keys to his successes, common mistakes he sees among young editors, and his workflow with two of the best directors in the industry. It's an especially useful conversation for those of you currently bogged down in the throes of post-production.
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23 min
September 13, 2018
IFW 9.12.2018: The Academy Makes a Smart Decision & How Hard Should You Be Working?
In this episode, Erik Luers and Liz Nord reveal a couple of changes to awards season that everyone can agree on, Nicoloas Cage is in a really good movie, and the best new wireless kit to own. On Ask No Film School - a reminder to take it easy. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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31 min
September 10, 2018
How Do You Know What to Cut on the Editing Floor? The First Short: THE GUY [Episode 3]
It seems that many short films even after they wrap a successful shoot never end up seeing the light of day. And why is that? Because they dry up in the post-production process. Whether it's for lack of money, lack of inspiration, lack of enthusiasm, or just plain destitution at what your footage has revealed, the sad truth is that may directors decide to leave their precious projects on the cutting room floor. All their time and effort, wasted, for not. On the final episode of The First Short, No Film School Producer Jon Fusco is joined by his editor Tam Le to discuss their own trying experiences over nine-months of post-production in an attempt to make sure that this will never happen to you. They cover the ideal relationship between editor and director, why a director should attempt to edit their film, how to identify what needs to be cut, how to establish tone and pacing and more.
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66 min
September 6, 2018
IFW 9.6.18: Our Most Anticipated Films at TIFF & Other Movies to See in Fall 2018
Festival season is upon us once more and with it, a whole new class of award contenders have suddenly made themselves known. In this episode, Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Liz Nord reveal the films their most excited about, as well as countless others you should keep an eye on as Fall begins to heat up. In gear news, we highlight a couple of new wide angle lenses that caught our eyes and on Ask No Film School we explain why it's never ok to use an artist's music without permission. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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42 min
September 3, 2018
How to Raise Money & What Should You Expect in Production? The First Short: THE GUY [Episode 2]
A short film is a tricky thing, you don’t know how much time or money to invest in such a personal thing that nobody may even end up seeing, so a lot of people don’t even try. The point of this podcast is to get you to stop worrying and just try. In this episode, No Film School Producer Jon Fusco breaks down the keys to running a successful Kickstarter, how to allocate your micro-budget, and keeping cool on set in the inevitable moments of failure.
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60 min
August 30, 2018
IFW 8.30.18: Our Top Advice from Three Years of Filmmaker Interviews
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss how Netflix is getting revenge on Cannes during this fall festival season, some big changes to the infamous film critics’ Tomatometer, and Disney finally announcing more solid details about its forthcoming streaming service. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including two new, indie-friendly drones. Liz also shares the top five pieces of filmmaking advice she’s collected over hundreds of filmmaker interviews at NFS. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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37 min
August 27, 2018
How Do You Make a Film with Zero Experience? The First Short: THE GUY [Episode 1]
A short film is a tricky thing, you don’t know how much time or money to invest in such a personal thing that nobody may even end up seeing, so a lot of people don’t even try. The point of this podcast is to get you to stop worrying and just try. In this episode, No Film School Producer Jon Fusco identifies the key crew you'll need to get started and how to them on your project, how to create a proper lookbook, what to plan for on a location scout, strategies in collaborating with your DP in pre-production and how to obtain the best gear for your project.
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59 min
August 23, 2018
IFW 8.23.18: 360° Filmmaking Finally Makes Sense & How Old is Too Old to Make a Movie?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Charles and Erik Luers discuss whether a new potential move by Amazon will change theatrical moviegoing as much as it changed shopping, a new Netflix feature that is sure to piss off some viewers, and a surprising turn in the #MeToo movement. In tech and gear news, a new upgrade to the ‘5D Mark II of 360 video’ means that immersive filmmaking might finally be hitting the masses. Liz and Charles also answer an Ask No Film School question about the viability of breaking into the film industry at any age. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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52 min
August 20, 2018
'Meow Wolf': How to Build an Immersive World Through Film
Oakley Anderson Moore sits down with co directors Morgan Capps and Jilann Spitzmiller to talk about making a documentary that captures the creative spirit of it’s subjects: “Meow Wolf: Origin Story.” With new found income at their disposal to hire more artists, the collective find themselves in a position to expand to more cities, and develop an entertainment wing that could be an amazing new opportunity for filmmakers. If you’re a filmmaker looking for a radical inclusive world to build, this could be a place you might fit right in.
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32 min
August 16, 2018
IFW 8.16.18: Blackmagic's New Resolve is a Masterpiece & The Scariest Trailer Ever Made
With Liz Nord absent and on the hunt for Alfonso Cuaron's famed VR piece in Mexico City, Jon Fusco and Erik Luers fill in to tell you about the scariest movie trailer ever made, Hulu's imminent disaster, and Disney's double standards. In gear news, Charles Haine is back to break down the brand spanking new, all in one suite that is Da Vinci Resolve and reveal a cool new lens. This week on Ask No Film School we give some tips on how to stay on track and motivated while working on a feature screenplay or a master's thesis. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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47 min
August 13, 2018
How to Make a Short Film for Only $4.50
What is the least amount of money you think you could spend on the production of a short film from pre to post production and still get into a major festival? Well if you guessed four dollars and fifty cents, then you probably read the title of this podcast, because its a figure that’s almost unimaginable in today's crowded short landscape. Nevertheless, performance artist/writer/actor Tony Grayson did just that back in 2017. Armed simply with his friend's old digital camcorder, he set off for his dad’s research lab in Chicago to try and shoot something. What he ended up with was "foundfootagexx100n.s.1" and its ensuing acceptance to the SXSW Film Festival. No Film School Producer Jon Fusco sat down with Grayson and talked about how he pulled off the shoot for such a minuscule budget, the value of casting aside preciousness in your work, and how a SXSW premiere led him to his next project, Allen Anders Live at the Comedy Castle (Circa 1987).
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33 min
August 9, 2018
IFW 8.9.18: How to Perfect Your Script & Why Docs Are the New Blockbusters
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss how theatrical documentaries are taking over the summer box office, give a fall festival preview, and mull over a newly announced Oscar category. In gear news, we reveal two new mobile audio solutions and an affordable ultra-wide zoom. Jon answers an Ask No Film School question about how to make sure your film script is properly formatted—and the right length. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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47 min
August 6, 2018
How to Shoot a Feature Film for Only $7000
With only $7K, fourteen days, and no crew, Alejandro Montoya Marín made a chockablock action-comedy feature. If you're wondering why these parameters, here's the reason: it took $7000 bucks for Robert Rodriguez to shoot his breakout film El Mariachi. And since it’s the 25th anniversary of that film, Rodriguez decided to host a show with El Rey called Rebel Without a Crew where he picks five filmmakers to each make a feature using the same arsenal. Marín was one of those filmmakers! The contingency of being on the show was that you would make a feature film with $7K and only fourteen shooting days -- with only a plus-one as your crew. In this conversation, NFS contributors Oakley Anderson Moore and Chris Boone talk to Marín about how he was able to pull all this off, and how ultimately, this experience was the perfect way to get past the hurdle where he can now himself a filmmaker.
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52 min
August 2, 2018
IFW 8.2.18: What to Know Before You Drone & The Best Way to Get Your Short Seen
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss the union negotiations that might have the Hollywood film industry gearing up for a strike, and ponder what the heck is going on with Moviepass. Jon also shares wisdom from Short of the Week about how to develop a distribution strategy for your short film. In gear news, Liz reviews the Freefly Movi smartphone stabilizer. Aerial cinematographer Randall Esulto joins us to answer an Ask No Film School question about how to get started with drones. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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51 min
July 30, 2018
How to Become a Top TV Editor
Emmy-nominated TV editors A.M. Peters ('Queer Eye') and Tenille Uithoff ('Full Frontal with Samantha Bee’) join Liz Nord to discuss how to break into post-production for TV, what you can expect once you do, and how to make it in the television editing business.
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38 min
July 26, 2018
IFW 7.26.18: Nikon Teases a Full Frame Mirrorless & What Should We Make of the James Gunn Firing?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss what we should make of James Gunn being fired from the ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ franchise over controversial tweets. We also reveal an industry trend worth watching from this year’s massive Comic-Con. Charles Haine joins us for gear news including confirmed rumors of Nikon's new mirrorless camera. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about building a portfolio website for your film work. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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44 min
July 23, 2018
How to Make the Jump from Short to Feature with Award Winning Director Jim Cummings
Jim Cummings career is a case study in DIY Filmmaking. His short film Thunder Road redefined the path of a festival award winner. After earning the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, the short took the internet by storm, bringing Jim and his crew ample exposure and a shot to turn their project into a feature. One would think that having a viral, Grand Jury Prize winning short would be enough to attract the attention of major studios, but despite the fact that they had a whole fifteen minutes of the film they could show off right away, Jim and his producing partner Ben Weissner could not get any big bites from investors. So they took matters into their own hands. The self-produced and largely crowd-funded feature version of Thunder Road premiered at SXSW earlier this year where it, guess what, won the Grand Jury Award for best feature. Now Jim and Ben want to share the knowledge they’ve learned over the course of their experience with young filmmakers across the world and to do so they’ve launched a Short to Feature lab in Malibu. We asked them to give us a rundown of what applicants can expect as well as the skills that they think every filmmaker interested in controlling the entire life of their film should know.
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26 min
July 19, 2018
IFW 7.19.18: How to Start Your Own Netflix & Why You Should Buy a Still Camera Over Video
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Charles Haine discuss why you might be able to skip having your film on Netflix in favor of launching your own streaming service. We also discuss a new study on film critics and what it means for production funding, and say a sad goodbye to Blockbuster Video. In gear news, the MacBook Pro sort of wins us back. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about why you should buy a stills camera to shoot video. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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51 min
July 16, 2018
Why Making a Good Music Documentary Means Speaking Two Universal Languages
It’s very hard to make a film about music that’s better than actually just listening to music. That’s the challenge co-directors T.G. Herrington and Danny Clinch took on in A Tuba to Cuba, a documentary the revered New Orleans Jazz band as they travel to post-embargo Cuba. NFS writer Oakley Anderson Moore sat down with Herrington and producer Nicelle Herrington, as well as band leader and doc subject Ben Jaffe at the film's SXSW premiere. They talk The importance of knowing your story, whether or not you know where it will take you, how to capture musicality through visuals and recording sound on a music documentary that contains and live concerts.
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34 min
July 12, 2018
IFW 7.12.18: How to Properly Use a Green Screen & The 25 Coolest Festivals in the World
Jon Fusco, Erik Luers and Charles Haine are here this week to help you identify a few dozen film festivals that need to be on your radar, go bananas over just how many billions of dollars Netflix is spending in 2018 and Nicolas Winding Refn's shocking accusation about the film industry. In gear news, we get serious about some security measures you could take to ensure the protection of your projects. This week on Ask No Film School we answer whether you should be using a blue, green, or even a red screen to accomplish digital effects in your film.
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45 min
July 9, 2018
How Working Within Extreme Constraints Actually Benefits Your Film
Emmy-winning director Madeline Sackler, Cinematographer Wolfgang Held (BRÜNO, PARTICLE FEVER) , and actor/producer Boyd Holbrook (LOGAN, NARCOS) join No Film School’s Liz Nord to share how they pulled off one of the most amazing behind-the-scenes production stories we've ever heard. Their narrative feature O.G. and documentary IT’S A HARD TRUTH AIN’T IT were both shot simultaneously in an active maximum-security prison. The documentary is co-directed by 13 incarcerated men and the feature was cast with more than 90% real inmates as extras and even as one of the leads. This conversation and the huge steps these filmmakers had to take to get their projects made—including spending an hour each way going in and out of prison security with all their gear every single day of production—will be an inspiration to anyone who has lofty goals but big constraints for their independent films.
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44 min
July 5, 2018
IFW 7.5.18: Where to Live for a Career in Film & How to Spend Your Camera Budget
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, and Charles Haine discuss how the extension of California’s Production Tax Credits is affecting the film and TV business, and the fate of ‘Supersize Me 2’ in the wake of director Morgan Spurlock’s sexual assault accusations. We also say a sad goodbye to the journalists killed last week at the Capital Gazette newspaper. In gear news, we geek out about 10Gb ethernet. Charles answers an Ask No Film School question about how to find your perfect camera and the best way to invest your gear budget. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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46 min
July 2, 2018
'Leave No Trace': The Secret Ingredient to Great Casting
Debra Granik is perhaps best known for her casting and direction of Jennifer Lawrence’s breakout role in WINTER’S BONE, which was nominated for an Oscar for Best Picture in 2011. In her latest, LEAVE NO TRACE, which premiered at Sundance earlier this year and is now hitting theaters, her casting is spot-on once again with a new young actress Thomasin McKenzie and actor Ben Foster of HELL OR HIGH WATER fame. In this episode, Liz Nord learned some of the secrets behind the organic feeling of her films, including fostering an environment throughout casting and production where every cast and crew member has a willingness of to be flexible and adaptive to changes in circumstance. Nord and Granik are joined by LEAVE NO TRACE producers Anne Rossellini and Anne Harrison to discuss how they cultivate this quality among their collaborators, the steps they had to take to shoot in an unpredictable outdoor environment, and lots more.
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33 min
June 28, 2018
IFW 6.28.18: How YouTube and Instagram Are Competing For Your Videos
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss how Instagram’s new IGTV service prompted YouTube to give more benefits to video creators, and other news from the massive VidCon event. We also cover the largest addition to the Academy of Motion Pictures ever, and yet another new addition to the movie theater subscription service arena. In gear news, Charles shares some exciting news in the post-production space. We also answers an Ask No Film School question about fair use, and when you can (or can’t) use news clips in your movie. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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44 min
June 25, 2018
What You Can Do in Distribution to Maximize the Life of Your Film
When you start out as a filmmaker, you think that all you have to do is make a great film. Unfortunately, it’s damn hard to get people to even hear about your film let alone watch it. Even if you play a prestigious festival like Sundance, for most filmmakers, the success of your film depends in large part on a well thought out and executed distribution strategy. Liz Manashil, manager of the Creative Distribution Initiative at the Sundance Institute sat down with NFS' Erik Luers and Oakley Anderson Moore to discuss some possibilities of such a strategy. From the state of distribution for indie films at this past Sundance Film Festival, to how you can get noticed by distributors at a film festival, there’s a wide parameter of useful information to prepare experienced and beginning filmmakers to maximize the life of your film after you finish it.
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48 min
June 21, 2018
IFW 6.21.18: Our First Impressions of ProRes RAW & The Movie Ticket Subscription Race Heats Up
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss why a recent marketing stunt by MoviePass smells rotten, and what a major theater chain is doing to compete with the ticket subscription service. We also examine where development execs are looking (or listening) for projects today. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including the results of our ProRes RAW testing. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to mark clips while recording without stopping your scene or interview. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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49 min
June 18, 2018
How to Meld the Perfect Collaborative Atmosphere on Set
Making a movie is like making a good stew. Sure, that may not be the first analogy you’d jump to while racking your filmmaking ethos, but for Robert Schwartzman director of The Unicorn, one of 2018’s best comedies, it just makes sense. Every good stew requires fresh ingredients. Your cast and crew are the meat and potatoes. But that stew can't just be about the ingredients. Without the proper mixture, it would just be a bunch of vegetables. You've got balance them out in a way so the flavors come together as a harmonious whole. And that’s the real job of the director. They’re the head chef. The captain. If you walked onto the set of a truly great chef, you'd find yourself in a sacred place that exudes the right collaborative energy. Perhaps the simplest way to achieve this is by treating everyone with the same level of respect, making sure every actor on set knows every crew member, how they contribute to the cooking process, and vice versa. Schwartzman erases the divide between the cast and crew, and focuses on the fact that everyone is just a person, working together to create something great. When you hear how Lauren Lapkus, Nick Rutherford, Maya Kazan and Darrell Britt-Gibson speak about their director in this podcast, you'll gain a better appreciation for just how important maintaining this type of atmosphere is. No Film School producer Jon Fusco sat down with them at SXSW 2018, for a conversation that is often hilarious and consistently insightful.
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32 min
June 14, 2018
IFW 6.14.18: Why Renting Gear Just Got Easier & How to Overcome Your Creative Block
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss the absurd reality that pits a film star against a TV star on the geopolitical stage, and why we will miss Anthony Bourdain. Charles Haine joins us for tech and gear news, including a move from ShareGrid that could change the gear rental market for the much, much better. Charles and Liz also answer an Ask No Film School question about what to do if you’re feeling stuck and having trouble moving forward on your films. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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45 min
June 11, 2018
No Business School: How to Save Time and Money on Your Films
Stephen R. Morse (AMANDA KNOX, EUROTRUMP) joins Liz Nord to discuss how his education at Oxford Business School changed the way he makes movies, and he breaks down some business school lessons that we can all apply to make our films in the most efficient and cost-effective ways possible.
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38 min
June 7, 2018
IFW 6.7.18: Our Favorite Gear from Cinegear 2018 & Why Movie Theaters are Failing Audiences
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss the unexpected indie hit en route to becoming Magnolia’s highest-grossing film, how cinemas may actually be doing a disservice to great cinematography, and a new platform helping filmmakers make money. Charles Haine joins us fresh off the plane from Cinegear to report on all the latest in video tech from the expo, including some big announcements from Panavision. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about which audio editing software to choose for a documentary.As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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51 min
June 4, 2018
"Hearts Beat Loud": The Secrets to Recording Live Music for Film
For "Hearts Beat Loud", Director Brett Haley wanted to tell a story about people who make music, so he asked his stars, Nick Offerman and Kiersey Clemons to play all the music...completely live. When it comes to actors playing musicians on screen, he made sure not to follow the conventional standard of well, having no standards. No lip synching, no dubs, no inserts of a hairy-knuckled hand double who knows how to play the guitar. Oakley Anderson Moore sat down with Haley and Offerman at Sundance to talk about the orchestration between film crew and musician that would create a set which allows his two professional actors (but amateur musicians) to do justice to both their roles and the music. For this film, the two aspects are intrinsically connected.
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23 min
May 30, 2018
How Do You Become a Filmmaker (And Other Questions)? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 10]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, using No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur as a case study, we answer questions from listeners. This is the final episode! Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide at netflix.com/amateur. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature. This episode of The First Feature is sponsored by Music Bed. Get 20% off you next on-site license at musicbed.com/new with coupon code "FirstFeature20."
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59 min
May 28, 2018
How Tech Can Be Used to Turn Your Movie into a Global Movement
Four-time Sundance filmmaker Tiffany Shlain and her Let It Ripple Studio have made and distributed films that have engaged over 50 Million people in dialogue with a new model that they developed to start global conversations with screenings and discussions across all continents on the same day, with a combination of live and virtual events. Shlain joins Liz Nord to discuss the mechanics behind these events, and how other filmmakers can turn their movies into far-reaching movements.
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50 min
May 24, 2018
IFW 5.24.18: Netflix Nabs the Obamas & A Major Week for RED
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Erik Luers and Charles Haine discuss the quiet indie making a loud noise at the international box office and why now is the time to pitch your high-concept horror film, as well as Netflix’s newest independent filmmakers: Barack and Michelle Obama. We also say a sad goodbye to master movie poster designer Bill Gold and literary titan Philip Roth, who both passed away this week. In gear news, RED’s hot streak with three big announcements this week. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about the difference between LUTs, color grading plugins, and dedicated color grading software. Plus, Wim Wenders on narrowing down his 8-hour rough cut of ‘Pope Francis - A Man of His Word.’ As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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46 min
May 23, 2018
How Do You Release Your Film? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 9]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, using No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur as a case study, we dive into the final release of Amateur. Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide at netflix.com/amateur. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature. This episode of The First Feature is sponsored by Music Bed. Get 20% off you next on-site license at musicbed.com/new with coupon code "FirstFeature20."
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60 min
May 21, 2018
How Post-Production Makes or Breaks a Film, Part 2: The Secret Art of Colorists
If you've seen a few independent films that have come out of the festival circuit the past year or two, odds are you've seen the work of Sam Daley, Nat Jencks, or Seth Ricart. They are three talented colorists who have graded films like "The Florida Project", "City of Ghosts", and "Beach Rats". All three sat down with No Film School at this past Sundance Film Festival where they premiered their color work on some of the edgiest, loveliest, or grittiest films we've seen this year! How do they work? What are the real lives of an indie film colorist? How can you get your film to look like that? Listen to this conversation to find out!
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49 min
May 17, 2018
IFW 5.17.18: How to Make Sure You Get Paid & Have We Discovered the New RED?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers share loads of news from the 71st Cannes Film Festival, including the biggest acquisitions, what caused Agnes Varda and Ava DuVernay to team up, and Spike Lee’s Oscar contender. Charles Haine joins us for gear news including why a company known for monitors might be making your next camera. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about the best cloud storage for video editing. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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39 min
May 16, 2018
How Do You Finish Your Film? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 8]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, using No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur as a case study, we dive into the post-production stage of filmmaking. Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide at netflix.com/amateur. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature. This episode of The First Feature is sponsored by Music Bed. Get 20% off you next on-site license at musicbed.com/new with coupon code "FirstFeature20."
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68 min
May 14, 2018
How Post-Production Makes or Breaks a Film, Part 1: The Editor's Process
The difference between a film that has some good moments and a full-fledged, unhindered story hinges on how it's treated in post-production. That success starts with the delicate navigation of the editor. Sitting down at this past Sundance Film Festival, a handful of talented post-production artists who worked on some of the most cutting-edge indie films of 2018, discuss how they work to make brilliant, award-winning films. In Part 1 of this podcast, we focus on the role of the editor, their process of working with directors, and how they articulate the nuanced philosophy behind their craft.
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43 min
May 10, 2018
IFW 5.10.18: A Selfie-Free Cannes Kicks Off & Can Your Short Really Be a Calling Card?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss the opening of the 71st annual Cannes Film Festival and how Netlifx is playing nice—or are they? We also cover the first results of the Academy’s ethics enforcements, and say a sad goodbye to prolific editor of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ and over 50 more films, Anne V. Coates. Jon also answers an Ask No Film School question about whether or not a short film should be used as an industry “calling card.” Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including a hot take on why 8K is a good thing. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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50 min
May 9, 2018
How Do You Go Through Production? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 7]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, using No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur as a case study, we dive into the production stage of filmmaking. Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide at netflix.com/amateur. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature. This episode of The First Feature is sponsored by Music Bed. Get 20% off you next on-site license at musicbed.com/new with coupon code "FirstFeature20."
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64 min
May 7, 2018
How Do You Protect Your Film’s Subjects, Data, and Yourself in Unsafe Situations?
Three filmmakers with documentary films in the 2018 Tribeca and HotDocs lineups—Assia Boundaoui of ‘The Feeling of Being Watched’, Nancy Schwartzman of ‘Roll Red Roll', and Cynthia Lowen of ’Netizens'—sit down with No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss their powerful films and several behind-the-scenes topics like how to gain the trust of subjects who have been exploited by the media or other institutions in the past, how to make uncomfortable issues into conversation-starters, how to tackle films that challenge entrenched beliefs while keeping yourself and your subjects safe, and more.
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46 min
May 3, 2018
IFW 5.3.18: Why RED is Partnering with Facebook & Is MoviePass Finished?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss two of the most important industry events that you might never have heard of, Cinemacon and the Newfronts, along with mayhem at Moviepass. We also say a sad goodbye to photojournalist Shah Marai, who was killed in a bombing in Afghanistan this week. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including a potentially exciting partnership between RED and Facebook.Charles and Jon also answer an Ask No Film School question about the right audio gear for recording podcasts. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.  
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51 min
May 2, 2018
How Do You Tell Your Story Visually? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 6]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, using No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film "Amateur" as a case study, we dive into the creative and visual side of prep including storyboarding, shotlisting, previz, and creating overheads. He also discusses some common pitfalls to avoid such as why it's challenging to rewrite the script during prep and why locking locations is so important before starting principal photography. Ryan gives us some tips into his favorite tools and apps that helped him through pre-production as well as the cameras and gear that made the production of the film possible.
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56 min
April 30, 2018
What a Festival Programmer Looks for in a Short Film
We’ve discussed many different tactics for getting your short films into film festivals on this podcast, but at SXSW last month we decided to head straight for the source: the people in charge of selecting the films themselves. That’s right we’re talking about the all-powerful festival programmer. And to get the inside scope there’s no one better than SXSW Senior Film Programmer Claudette Godfrey. On today’s program, Claudette and NFS Producer Jon Fusco run through exactly what it is that attracts a festival programmer to a certain short. She also gives us a rundown of the things a filmmaker should focus on when submitting, as well as what they should attempt to avoid when working on a project they hope will be selected. Claudette makes a powerful case for the value of festivals like SXSW for all filmmakers and if you’re in the middle of planning a festival run, you better listen close.
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38 min
April 26, 2018
IFW 4.26.18: Has Tribeca Become New York’s Best Fest for Indie Filmmakers?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Erik Luers and Jon Fusco share all the news, films, projects, and directors you need to know about from our on-the-ground coverage of the Tribeca Film Festival, and debate Tribeca’s importance for indie filmmakers. Charles Haine joins us for tech and gear news, including the lighting that was designed for Michael Haneke and is now available to you. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about whether or not you really need to shoot at 60fps for broadcast production. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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56 min
April 25, 2018
How Do You Attach Cast and Prep a Film? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 5]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, using No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur as a case study, we dive into how to cast your movie—and what to expect when you go into prep. This episode covers Ryan's experiences attaching cast to Amateur, including Michael Rainey Jr. (POWER, LUV), Josh Charles (THE GOOD WIFE, SPORTS NIGHT), Sharon Leal (ADDICTED, DREAMGIRLS), and Brian White (RAY DONOVAN, SCANDAL). We then move into the prep process on the film, and touch on: How a short film can help with attaching cast; The two-part process of auditioning Michael Rainey Jr. (who came us to via Jason Berman, who had produced a film with Michael in it, LUV); The value of a casting director (in Amateur's case, Jessica Kelly and Kate Geller; What an "offer" is and why you can only offer the part to one actor at a time; Doing street casting to find "real people," in this case, several basketball players who had never acted before; Location scouting and tax credits; Scheduling and what a "company move" is (and why we needed to avoid them); The challenges of working with a child actor and the resulting limitations on shooting hours; Rehearsing and read-throughs; Tech scouts... and more. Thank you to the Panavision New Filmmaker Program, Sony, G-technology, and Vision Research for their help in providing equipment on the film (which we'll cover more of in our forthcoming production episodes). Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide at netflix.com/amateur. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature. This episode of The First Feature is sponsored by Music Bed. Get 20% off you next on-site license at musicbed.com/new with coupon code "FirstFeature20."
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75 min
April 23, 2018
Why Now is the Time to Make Your Doc Short
Three filmmakers with short nonfiction films in the SXSW 2018 lineup—Jury Award-winner Charlie Tyrell, Mohammad Gorjestani, and Leah Galant—sit down with No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss why this is a golden age for documentary shorts, how they each got their projects made, and how shorts can fit into your filmmaking career’s bigger picture even if you’ve already worked on commercials or features.
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49 min
April 19, 2018
IFW 4.19.18: The NAB Tech That You Need to Know & Does Netflix or Cannes Have Indie Film's Back?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Erik Luers and discuss whether independent filmmakers ultimately pay the price in the ongoing war between Netflix and the Cannes Film Festival. We also preview the Tribeca Film Festival, which we will be covering in depth over the next two weeks, and say a sad goodbye to influential film director Milos Forman, who passed away last Friday. Charles Haine joins us for gear and tech news, wherein he recaps the best new filmmaking toys and tools that our team discovered over four days at America’s biggest broadcasting expo. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to put together a showreel for sound design. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at www.nofilmschool.com
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60 min
April 18, 2018
How Do You Pitch Your Film and Find Financing? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 4]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, we dive into the pitching and financing processes on Ryan Koo's Netflix Film AMATEUR. This episode covers his experiences pitching Amateur eighty (!) times and eventually getting it to Netflix, including the following points: Making a pitch into a back-and-forth conversation as early as possible; What goes into a pitch packet other than the script, including a rip-o-matic/multimedia lookbook; Using CRM software to track producers and financiers (Ryan used Streak); How rejection can be a development process unto itself; Why "producer" is an amorphous term and how to identify producers with complementary skill sets; Who his producers were (Jason Michael Berman, Chip Hourihan, and Mark Moran) and what their roles were; and finally, How he got the film to Netflix. Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide at netflix.com/amateur. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature. This episode of The First Feature is sponsored by Music Bed. Get 20% off you next on-site license with coupon code "FirstFeature20."
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67 min
April 16, 2018
How to Get a Vimeo Staff Pick with DANIELS, Kirsten Lepore, and Head Curator Sam Morrill
The landscape for short films is changing quickly. One might say we're entering a "Golden Age," where content is being taken seriously and you can even make money off of a five-minute video...if you get the right eyes on it. Traditionally, getting those views used to be all about submitting your project onto the festival circuit. This also came with the stipulation that you couldn't exhibit your project online or anywhere else if you wanted to make it in. That's not the case anymore.  Many aspiring filmmakers may not know just how valuable a Vimeo Staff Pick can be to your career. The distinction, which celebrated its tenth anniversary at SXSW this year, can lead not only to massive exposure but gigs from brands, producers and even music companies. You can really make a name for yourself if you're one of the 3-4 projects selected every day. Case and point, Jon Fusco's guests on today's show who have a combined 19 video staff picks between them: DANIELS, of Swiss Army Man fame, and Kirsten Lepore who's animated shorts in the style of Hi, Stranger led to jobs like creating an episode of Adventure Time, which later went on to win an Emmy. Together they join Vimeo's Head of Curation Sam Morrill to discuss how to get a Vimeo Staff Pick, what that Staff Pick can do for your career and how to best position yourself for a successful career after creating a short.
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50 min
April 12, 2018
IFW 4.12.18: The Gear That Finally Made NAB Exciting Again
In this special episode of Indie Film Weekly, Charles Haine, Andy Zou, and Jon Fusco broadcast live from the historic Plaza Hotel in downtown Las Vegas. The trio of No Film School editors come together to discuss their first couple of days of non-stop coverage at the annual NAB Show. And man, did this year's convention come through in a big way. While we've seen less of the sexy lenses and cameras that were abundant earlier in the decade, certain pieces of gear (including major products in the lighting department) signal that we could very well be on our way to a new era of filmmaking.
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32 min
April 11, 2018
How Do You Become a Screenwriter? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 3]
In this episode of our step-by-step podcast on how to get your first feature made, we dive into the screenwriting process on No Film School founder Ryan Koo's Netflix Film Amateur (out now!). This episode covers many screenwriting tips and tricks, including: Tracking your hours to ensure you prioritize screenwriting in your life; Brainstorming out loud and recording yourself so you don't forget a lightbulb moment; Writing your first draft by hand to ensure you finish it and you can't go back and edit; Spending >50% of your time NOT in screenwriting software — researching, outlining, breaking the story; Why applying for grants can be helpful even if you don't win them; The Sundance Screenwriters Lab (which we did an entire podcast on at Sundance); Doing entire drafts from the perspective of supporting characters; Apps like Workflowy, Final Draft, and WriterDuet; and Workshopping your script with actors at table reads. Watch Amateur on Netflix, available now worldwide. You can find all other episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature.
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55 min
April 9, 2018
How the Directors of 'Prospect' Built a Utopia in Pre-Production
What would you do if you were tasked with building an entire universe on an infinitesimally small budget? Where would you even start? This is probably the biggest problem that any independent filmmaker with a science fiction project must solve. Co-Directors Zeek Earl and Christopher Caldwell have found a solution. To put it plainly, you can't separate the money from the creativity. For Earl, Caldwell and producer Brice Budke, this meant that every creative decision was tied with a producing decision. Perhaps the most important of these decisions was to rent a warehouse in Seattle, fill it up with thirty different artists (from bike-makers to carpenters), and go through seven months of pre-production, building the universe of their debut feature "Prospect" as practically and detailed as they could. Their efforts garnered them the Adam Yauch Hörnblowér Award after their premiere at SXSW. This singled out their film as the best in the Visions category. NFS Producer Jon Fusco sits down with Zeek, Christopher and Brice to discuss their old-school, unorthodox methods and what it takes to build a Utopia in pre-production.
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22 min
April 5, 2018
IFW 4.5.18: Silicon Valley Takes on Hollywood & How Long Should Your Short Film Be?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss a new finding on the average length of Oscar-winning short films and what it means for you, which digital companies may be replacing the Hollywood studio system once and for all, and why some audiences in Asia may be missing out on the most popular indie films. In tech and gear news we get in the mood for NAB with some filmmaker-friendly updates from Adobe and more. Filmmaker and editor Josh Granger joins us to answer an Ask No Film School question about using multiple nested timelines in Premiere Pro. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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32 min
April 4, 2018
How Do You Turn a Short into a Feature? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 2]
Here's Episode Two of our new podcast series The First Feature. This is a step-by-step guide on how to get your first feature made, using Ryan Koo's new Netflix Original Film AMATEUR as a case study. In this episode, we get into: Whether or not your short should be a proof-of-concept for a feature, how to make production manageable and cost-effective for a short film, auditioning, casting, and finding crew for a short without a lot of personal connections, production prep, how much money you need to make your short, and how to distribute it once its done. AMATEUR will premiere on Netflix on April 6, 2018. You can find all episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature
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63 min
April 2, 2018
'First Match': Money-Saving Production Hacks to Make Low-Budget Features Shine
Director/Writer Olivia Newman, DP Ashley Connor, Editor Tamara Meem, and producers Chanelle Elaine and Bryan Unkeless of ‘First Match’ join No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss how they took their film from short to Netflix Original feature, how they made a sports movie inside a personal narrative instead of the other way around, and the strategies they used to stretch a limited production budget into creating a very polished final product.
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49 min
March 29, 2018
IFW 3.29.18: Canon Reveals its ARRI Competitor & Spielberg's Take on Netflix
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss the MoviePass effect on indie films and a whole bunch of ways the industry is throwing shade on Netflix—including promising young upstart Steven Spielberg. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including Canon’s entry into the Full Frame Cinema market with the C700 FF. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about recording pro-res. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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52 min
March 28, 2018
How Do You Know Which Idea to Pursue? The First Feature: AMATEUR [Episode 1]
Here's Episode One of our new podcast series The First Feature. This is a step-by-step guide on how to get your first feature made, using Ryan Koo's new Netflix Original Film AMATEUR as a case study. In this episode, we get into: The three questions you can ask yourself to help decide which movie to make; when you need an agent; how Koo lied his way into MTV (and New York); Koo's DIY web series with Zack Lieberman, The West Side; how new platforms represent an opportunity because of decreased competition; how failure can be more instructive than success. AMATEUR will premiere on Netflix on April 6, 2018. You can find all episodes of The First Feature at nofilmschool.com/firstfeature
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48 min
March 26, 2018
Don't Wait for Somebody to Make Your Movie, Do it Yourself: The Winning Mantra Behind 'Thunder Road'
Some would say that Jim Cummings' journey to winning this year's SXSW Grand Jury Prize for best narrative feature started back in 2016 when his short film "Thunder Road" won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance. Yes, the short, which many consider one of the greatest of all time, was the source for their feature adaptation, but in reality, Jim's journey to SXSW royalty started long before "Thunder Road." And while he's certainly the star of this film, it would also be unfair to say that Jim made this journey alone. Between Jim, the film's creative director Danny Madden, and producer Ben Wiessner, the tight-knit crew behind the film have worked together on projects at SXSW for the last seven years in a row. In 2018, their production company ORNANA, wasn't only in Austin to represent "Thunder Road", but also for the Vimeo Staff Pick Award-winning short "Krista." Mere hours after winning their respective awards, the team was already at it again, creating a video and launching a Kickstarter for the feature-length version of Krista. Even with a Grand Jury Prize from Sundance at their disposal, Jim and crew found it impossible to find anyone who would produce their feature. But that didn't stop them. It just fueled the fire more. "Thunder Road", which tells the story of an eccentric police officer whose mourning over his mother's death leads to disastrous consequences, is the result of a decade of strong team building, work ethic, and an unrelenting desire to get stories told. Joining Producer Jon Fusco on the podcast today are several members of the producing team that made it happen, Ben Wiessner, Natalie Metzger and Matt Miller. cinematographer Lowell Meyer (who himself had three projects in competition at the festival) and of course: writer, director and actor, Officer Arnaud himself, Jim Cummings. We discuss all aspects of production which surround their mantra: "Don't wait for somebody to make your movie, do it yourself."
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26 min
March 22, 2018
IFW 3.22.18: No Film School's Greatest Piece of Original Content Ever & A New Cut of 'The Shining'?
Jon Fusco and Erik Luers are back from SXSW while Liz Nord has mysteriously disappeared, so get ready for a testosterone-fueled recap of the week's best news from the entertainment world! The resident men of the publication discuss the impact of what could be No Film's Greatest piece of original content ever, an intriguing new cut of Stanley Kubrick's classic The Shining, and how The Weinstein's Company bankruptcy could make things even worse for Harvey's victims. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including what could be a less expensive new alternative to the Alexa LF. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about the best way to find clean, high quality archival footage for your documentaries. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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41 min
March 19, 2018
The First Feature: AMATEUR Podcast Announcement
The First Feature is a new in-depth podcast series on No Film School about the making of a single film: in this case, NFS founder Ryan Koo's first feature AMATEUR. AMATEUR is a Netflix Original and premieres April 6; the trailer was released today. Every episode of The First Feature will cover a different phase of production, from screenwriting, to prep, to production, to release. It's meant to be a step-by-step guide to everything Koo did to get his first feature made, and the lessons he learned along the way. Episode one coming soon.
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2 min
March 19, 2018
How to Film in the Face of Opposition
Can you imagine being pepper sprayed, pelted/bombarded with rubber bullets, or hit with water cannons while still managing to hold on to your camera and record? That’s what filmmaker Cody Lucich took on for eight months to document the Standing Rock protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline. No Film School's Oakley Anderson Moore saw the first screening of Akicita: The Battle of Standing Rock at the Sundance film festival and sat down with Lucich and producer Ginger Shankar to talk about the process of making their feature. If you’ve wondered what it takes to film an uprising of civil disobedience in the face of a militarized police force, this conversation will put you right in the middle of one. 
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37 min
March 15, 2018
IFW 3.15.18: Why SXSW is More than Just a Film Festival
Co-hosts Jon Fusco, Erik Luers, Oakley Anderson-Moore and yours truly, Liz Nord have been running all over downtown Austin, Texas for the past week to bring you insights from America's coolest film event, the SXSW Film Festival and conference. In this episode, we forego our regular show format to share in-depth festival coverage, from news on the ground, to interviews with festival award-winners, to the best advice from industry panelists, to survival tips for navigating the massive event. We also talk about the value for filmmakers of a festival with as many non-film tracks and sections as this one has.
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42 min
March 12, 2018
Episodic Roundtable: How to Get Your Series Off the Ground
Nash Edgerton, Tonya Glanz, and Cesar Mazariegos are three creators of shows that were featured in the new Indie Episodic section at Sundance 2018. They Join No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss how the got their series off the ground, stretched production dollars across multiple episodes, and how much freedom they felt working in this burgeoning medium, unrestricted by duration, platform and traditional production rules.
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38 min
March 8, 2018
IFW 3.8.18: What to Look for at SXSW 2018 & How to Perfect Your Dolly Moves
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers get pumped for America’s coolest film festival, SXSW, and share our fun-fact-filled awards season recap. Charles Haine joins us for gear news including new and improved versions of three useful tools. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about the best way to get those surprisingly tricky super slow shots. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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42 min
March 5, 2018
How To Use Trends in Filmmaking to Your Advantage
If you haven’t picked up on the hottest trend in film and TV right now, then you may be living under a rock. Of course, we're talking about the “80’s Revival” a movement seemingly spurred by the success of Stranger Things. In reality, however, the 80’s Revival may just be the sign of a new wave of filmmakers coming to fruition in the masses. 80’s babies who are looking to re-live their childhood on the big screen are having their moment at just the right time. They have an eager audience at their disposal and an even more eager group of producers looking for projects. Many movies of the revival deal with similar themes. You can usually bet that a group of suburban children will encounter some sort of supernatural force then band together to defeat it. Summer of 84 puts a spin on the trend, keeping many of the Stand By Me vibes, but committing to an antagonist that’s more grounded in reality. In the film, a group of kids begins to suspect that their neighbor is, in fact, a serial killer. As a result, the kids spend their summer gathering clues and spying on him to prove he’s responsible for the death of several other teens in the neighborhood. Summer of 84 is directed by the filmmaking trio that made Turbo Kid, which first started off as a short, before being picked up and greenlit for a feature. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with the directing trio at Sundance and talked about how they used the “80’s Revival” to their advantage to strike while the iron was hot.
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28 min
March 1, 2018
IFW 3.1.18: Canon Finally Makes a Mirrorless Camera & Our 2018 Oscars Preview
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers preview the upcoming Academy Awards, ponder whether Netflix’s total dominance of original content is good for indie filmmakers, update you on the latest in the battle for Net Neutrality, and say a sad goodbye to veteran producer Benjamin Melniker. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including new camera offerings from Sony and Canon in the affordable 4K mirrorless space. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to rig a camera to a rollercoaster. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com. https://nofilmschool.com/2018/03/indie-film-weekly-030118
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53 min
February 26, 2018
Why You Need to Stop Making Excuses and Make a Short Film
To say that it’s tough to play your short at Sundance is an understatement. In 2018, 69 shorts were picked from 8,740 submissions. While there’s no simple formula on how to make a short film will get into Sundance, programmer Dilcia Barerra told No Film School that there is one important guiding principle for filmmakers that do get in: be authentic to your reality and your style. Anything contrived is obvious to programmers. While at Sundance, Oakley Anderson Moore sat down with five filmmakers whose short films embody just that authentic quality that you instantly recognize in a really good short. Their conversation can offer you insight on how to make a good film that’s authentic to your voice.
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50 min
February 22, 2018
IFW 2.22.18: When to Use a Cine Lens & Has BitCoin Officially Hit the Film Industry?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers and discuss how BitCoin and the blockchain are revolutionizing the film industry. We also update you on awards season and the Berlin International Film Festival, as well as marvel over ‘Black Panther's astonishing opening weekend and talk about what it means for indie filmmakers. Charles Haine joins us for gear news including official details of the Fujifilm X-H1 mirrorless camera. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about the difference between still and cinema lenses. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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52 min
February 19, 2018
'Piercing': How to Cultivate Tone and Style in Your Film
It’s no secret that filmmakers copy those other filmmakers in their lives who most inspire them. Whether that’s picking up on some sort of trademark dialogue, production design, pacing, music, performances, editing, or camerawork, many times it's easy to identify and trace a piece of style one director drew influence in from another. With two wildly different, yet eerily similar films under his belt, Nicolas Pesce is mastering the art of adapting his favorite filmmaker’s techniques in a way that serves his own form of storytelling. He describes his first film The Eyes of My Mother as his tribute to 50’s/60’s black and white horror, while he claims his newest project, the stylistically impressive thriller Piercing, is his take on the Giallo crime pictures which peaked in popularity in Italy during the 1970’s. That’s not to say his films are a direct emulation of those pieces that he so dearly loves. As his actor Christopher Abbott puts it, filmmaking is all about “gathering influences to create something of your own.” Clearly, Pesce is a filmmaker who is not only interested in taking risks, but in creating and pushing style as well. Piercing is indeed one of those risky pictures. Abbott plays a man with, well, psychological problems. One night he kisses his wife and baby goodbye, seemingly on his way to a business conference. His real plan, however, is to check into a hotel, call an escort service, and kill an unsuspecting prostitute. That prostitute is played by Mia Wasikowska who ends up providing her captor with a little bit more trouble than he initially imagined. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with Pesce, Abbot, and their producer Jacob Wasserman back at Sundance to discuss, cultivating tone and style in your picture, maintaining your vision through intensely detailed pre-production and how to create screenplays that will attract both actors and producers to your project.
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35 min
February 15, 2018
IFW 2.15.18: The Worst Job On Set Gets Better & What Camera Should You Shoot Your Short On?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss ‘Black Panther’ mania ahead of the groundbreaking film’s opening weekend. We also get into the Parking Production Assistants of New York decision to unionize, the results of the WGA Awards, and say a sad goodbye to Oscar-nominated film composer Jóhann Jóhannsson. Charles Haine joins us for gear news including some speculation about a potentially game-changing partnership between RED and Foxconn. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question on whether you should shoot with RED or ARRI cameras for your short film. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com. https://nofilmschool.com/2018/02/indie-film-weekly-021518
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48 min
February 12, 2018
How to Maintain Your Sanity as Director When Everything Descends Into Chaos
In his introduction speech prior to the premiere of "The Catcher Was a Spy," Sundance Director of Programming John Cooper described the film’s director Ben Lewin as the “nicest director you'll ever meet.” When you’ve got four decades of dealing with the chaos of filmmaking under your belt and can still be described as such, you know you must be doing something right. While Lewin may describe his career as a “career built on accidents,” in reality, it is his attitude and personality that keep people coming with projects again and again. The greatest lessons Lewin’s learned don’t come from a technical, professional or even filmmaking level. They’re personal lessons. These are the type which help to maintain a working personality, sanity, level-headedness and leadership when the shit around you has hit the fan. His philosophy is to stay positive, especially between projects. Everyone knows it's hard to make a movie, so why gripe about it? "The Catcher Was a Spy" is a film that not only Lewin, but Hollywood at large, has been trying to bring to the big screen for years. It tells the story of Moe Berg, a queer Jewish major league baseball player, who was hired by the US government during WWII as a spy. His mission: to kill Werner Heisenberg before he could finish creating the Atomic Bomb for the Nazis. While it may sound absurd, the story is one hundred percent true. The film made its premiere at Sundance where No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with Lewin to discuss his career, coping with the post-production blues, and most importantly, how to maintain your sanity when making a living as a director.
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32 min
February 8, 2018
IFW 2.8.18: ARRI Finally Goes 4K & Tarantino's Big On-Set Boner
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss why the ‘Kill Bill’ car crash story matters for every filmmaker, how to create a winning Super Bowl ad, and the results of the recent DGA Awards. Liz also answers an Ask No Film School question about what to do if you don’t think you fit in at film school. Charles Haine joins us for a huge week in gear announcements, including ARRI’s new 4K Alexa LF. As always, we also bring you upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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54 min
February 5, 2018
DP Roundtable: How to be the Cinematographer Your Director Needs
Meet four powerhouse cinematographers who had nine projects between them at Sundance this year: Claudia Raschke, Shana Hagan, Ashley Connor and Mia Cioffi Henry. The talented group sat down at Sundance 2018 with No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss the benefits of switching between docs & features instead of sticking to just one, how to be the cinematographer your director needs, what to do when a production starts to go off the rails, why cinematography is a people’s business, and much more. The group has a pretty amazing combined filmography. At Sundance alone, they screened docs, narratives, shorts, and an episodic TV show. They also represent four different decades of DPs, having begun shooting professionally in the ‘80s, ‘90s, 2000’s and 2010s, respectively, so they were able to share stories and advice with each other that we can all benefit from.
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59 min
February 1, 2018
IFW 2.1.18: Why VR is Finally Hot & Has RED Developed Its Alexa Killer?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Erik Luers discuss two historic Sundance deals and what the festival sales tell us about the ever-changing indie distribution landscape. We also cover the Sundance awards and ponder whether MoviePass’s risky strategy will pay off. Liz answers an Ask No Film School question about perfecting your film's fundraising pitch. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including RED’s limited edition Gemini sensor and an analysis of the cameras that were used to shoot Sundance films. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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44 min
January 29, 2018
The Zellner Brothers on Why You Need to Do Something New With Every Film You Make
Nathan and David Zellner are no strangers to Sundance, but perhaps they wish the festival was as new and exciting to them as it was when they premiered "Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter" back in 2014. That's not to say Park City has grown stale for the directing brothers, merely that they enjoy new experiences. So much so, in fact, that it has become the driving force in their creative mission over the course of their career. They make it a point not to explore material which they have already explored, so with every new film, they add a new genre to their resume. For their current project, the subversively titled "Damsel," that means "western." "Damsel" takes place in the frontier west sometime in the 1800's. Robert Pattinson plays a wealthy dandy-man by the name of Samuel who hires a priest (in fact played by one of the Zellners) to accompany him in tracking down and marrying his beloved Penelope. Penelope is played by Mia Wasikowska who had two brilliant and strong-willed performances at the festival this year with this film and Nick Pesce's "Piercing." No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with the Zellner's the day after their film premiered to discuss their "fresh start" philosophy, their roots as child filmmakers, and what it's important to remember when acting in your own films.
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24 min
January 25, 2018
IFW 1.25.18: Did Streaming Deals Die at Sundance 2018?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco are joined by Oakley Anderson-Moore and Erik Luers to give a full rundown from the snowy streets of Park City. The whole team has been trudging through the mountain snow for the past week to bring you all the most fascinating stories from America's preeminent independent film event. We forego our regular show format to share in-depth Sundance coverage, from the lay of the land, to celebrity run-ins, to the most intriguing films. We also cover festival acquisitions—or lack thereof—and what the lesser presence of Netflix and Amazon in the buying pool might mean for independent filmmakers. Finally, we bring news of the other biggest event in the film world this past week, the 2018 Academy Award nominations.You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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57 min
January 22, 2018
How to Build a Score That Raises Your Audience's Expectations
Well, here we are, live from Utah and our first interview out of Sundance is for a film called "Arizona." Bizarre right? Well not nearly as bizarre as the film itself. Set in the midst of the 2009 housing crisis, this darkly comedic story follows Cassie Fowler (played by Rosemary DeWitt), a single mom and struggling realtor whose life goes off the rails when she witnesses a murder. The man who commits the murder (played by Danny McBride) proceeds to take her hostage and she must do her best to escape the grasp of his insanity. The result is a film that quickly alternates between dark comedy and horror/slasher, which makes sense considering the team behind it will be responsible for the "Halloween" sequel coming later this year. But how do you toe that line without lessening the effects of either genre? Director Jonathan Watson has been part of David Gordon Green and McBride's Rough House Pictures since "Eastbound and Down," but this is his first shot at the helm of a feature. To enhance that slasher vibe he employed the talents of composer Joseph Stephens. No Film School's Jon Fusco sits down with the collaborators to talk about how a great score can be used to influence your audience, the typical workflow of audio post-production and how a composer can stand out in the biz.
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31 min
January 18, 2018
IFW 1.18.18: The Best Filmmaking Apps & Our Sundance 2018 Preview
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco are headed to Park City, Utah for the 34th Sundance Film Festival. They are joined by NFS Managing Editor Erik Luers to share everything you should know to get ready for the big event, whether you’ll be there in person or not. In gear news, Kodak makes a big gamble on a new version of old tech, and in Ask No Film School, Charles Haine reveals the most useful film production apps on the market. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.  
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44 min
January 15, 2018
Best of the The No Film School Podcast 2017, Part 3
This is the third and final episode of our “Best of 2017”, but honestly, with the quality of advice we received over the course of our interviews last year, we could keep this going forever. All of the excerpts featured in this week’s volume are part of what we here at No Film School like to call “Roundtable” episodes. We’ll try to get at least one or two of these done at every festival we travel to. The idea is really to get a group of filmmakers together and have them discuss their craft together in a forum where everyone can relate to each other and build off of their experiences. A lot of times they will be fresh off seeing each other's work so the questions keep flying and lead to some fantastic stories. We’ve selected three of these episodes to feature today, “What It Takes to Get Your Short into Sundance,” “How to Get Your Midnight Shorts into SXSW,” and “DP Roundtable: The Shots That Almost Killed Us.” For those of you making short films, these clips should be especially helpful.
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57 min
January 11, 2018
IFW 1.11.18: Our Pick for Best Mirrorless Camera & A Golden Globes to Remember
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss one of the most memorable Golden Globes ever and other awards season news, as well as the group of industry women coming out *against* the #MeToo movement. Liz answers an Ask No Film School question about holding public screenings before your festival premiere. Charles Haine joins us to preview the new film and video gear being released at this year’s CES, including a very unusual entry from Kodak. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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49 min
January 8, 2018
Best of the The No Film School Podcast 2017, Part 2
It’s officially a new year but we’re still not over how great our podcasts turned out in 2017. Last year, we started doing interview podcasts every single week in addition to our Indie Film Weekly episodes. We’ve had tons of great guests from Sean Baker to Flying Lotus and everything in between. In the first volume of our “Best Of” episodes, we heard from Flying Lotus, Gillian Robespierre, Brett Gelman and more. Today you’ll hear selections from Sean Baker, Ruben Ostlund, Parker Smith and Lloyd Kaufman of Troma Entertainment. Our series will continue next week, as NFS Producer Jon Fusco leads you through more of the best clips from 2017. If you haven’t heard all of our interview podcasts, these are some great examples of the type of information you can expect to come away with after every listen.
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50 min
January 4, 2018
IFW 1.4.18: The Most Popular Rental Gear of 2017 & Is Netflix About to Be Sold?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine discuss rumors of a major merger that could change the industry as we know it, and results of the 2017 box office returns. We also say a sad goodbye to ‘Black Swan’ production designer Thérèse DePrez. In gear news, we reveal the most rented items on ShareGrid last year. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to choose vintage lenses for your next project. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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43 min
December 28, 2017
Best of the The No Film School Podcast 2017, Part 1
Well, it's been quite a year. Here at No Film School, we started doing interview podcasts every single week in addition to our Indie Film Weekly episodes. We’ve had tons of great guests from Sean Baker to Flying Lotus and everything in between and we’re all really proud of the type of resource this podcast has become. Before we conduct each interview, we'll take the time to remind our guests that this will be a different sort of interview than the other ones they’ve been doing on the press junket or at the festivals. We’re not just interested in hearing about what makes their movie great. Rather, we want to frame these episodes as educational gems, with takeaways from their experiences that every one of our listeners can put into practice. In that sense, we really think we’ve succeeded. If you went back and listened to every single one of our interview episodes that came out this year, we're confident that you’ll come out with more than enough information to get yourself started on making your film. You’ll be all out of excuses. Over the next couple weeks, editor/producer Jon Fusco will be leading you through some of our best clips of 2017, so if you haven’t heard all of our interview podcasts, these episodes will be a great overview of those pearls of advice that may end up helping you down the road.
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41 min
December 21, 2017
IFW 12.21.17: The Best Movies, Gear, and Filmmaking Advice of 2017
This special, year-end episode of Indie Film Weekly reveals the best that 2017 had to offer while you were busy making films. This year was full of controversy and growing pains in the industry, balanced by stellar indie releases, gear innovations, and inspiring filmmaker journeys. In our final episode of 2017, co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine reveal our favorite films, top camera and gear choices, and predictions for the future of the film business. We also discuss our best takeaways from talking to some of the most interesting filmmakers and industry pros on the planet, from DIY maverick Sean Baker to ‘Wonder Woman’ DP Matt Jensen to French new wave and Cannes-winning filmmaker Agnes Varda. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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46 min
December 14, 2017
IFW 12.14.17: Netflix's Most Popular Shows Revealed & An Unexpected Way to Improve Your Script
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss Louis CK’s ‘I Love You, Daddy’ distribution saga and awards season updates (and upsets) from the Golden Globes, European Film Awards, and IDA Documentary Awards. We also reveal Netflix's most binged shows of 2017, get into a pretty geeky debate about Star Wars, and share tips from filmmaker Ela Thier about how to become your own script doctor. Charles Haine joins us for gear news and answers an Ask No Film School question about scanning photos to use in your film. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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50 min
December 11, 2017
How to Film in a War Zone
Directors Nathan Fitch and Daniel McCabe join No Film School’s Liz Nord to share their tips on preparing to film in a conflict zone, both practically and emotionally. Fitch embedded with the US Military in Afghanistan for his film 'Island Soldier', and McCabe filmed amidst various factions of the Congolese civil war for six years for his documentary 'This is Congo’. In this episode, the directors reflect on their experiences and give advice on what gear makes sense to bring into a conflict situation and how to shoot while you’re literally being shot at. For new stories daily on the craft of filmmaking, visit nofilmschool.com.
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44 min
December 7, 2017
IFW 12.7.17: How a Filmmaker Brought Down the Russian Olympics & When Do You Hide Brand Logos?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine discuss one filmmaker’s major role in Russia’s Olympic doping scandal, the first news from Sundance 2018, and the inaugural Los Angeles Online Film Critics Society Awards decision to split best male and female directors into two separate categories. We say goodbye to influential video essay series ‘Every Frame a Painting’ and Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to deal with brands and logos in your film. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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46 min
November 30, 2017
IFW 11.30.17: Major Changes Coming To Awards Season & When Should You Shoot Anamorphic?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine discuss the indie films that are changing the face of awards season after the results of the Gothams and the National Board of Review list results were revealed this week. We cover the questionable award categorizations of Jordan Peele’s ‘Get Out’ and Errol Morris’ ‘Wormwood’ and why they matter to other filmmakers. We also hear some unconventional lensing advice from rising star DP Katelin Arizmendi and debate the merits of anamorphic. In gear news, we share the results of getting our hands on DJI’s new Zenmuse X7 camera. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to shoot anamorphic on a still camera. As always, we bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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41 min
November 27, 2017
A Pre-to-Post Primer on Documentary Filmmaking
Three producers with decades of combined experience under their belts join No Film School’s Liz Nord for a detailed primer on how to get a documentary made and seen. Geeta Gandbhir has been nominated for three Emmy Awards and has won two, as well as working professionally as an editor as such acclaimed titles as Oscar-winning 'O.J.: Made in America’, Chanda Chevannes is an award-winning documentarian as well as a film instructor at Centennial College in Toronto, and Chris Metzler is prolific documentarian known for cult favorite docs like the John Waters-narrated ‘Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea’ which won over 30 best doc awards and was broadcast on the Sundance Channel. In this episode, we cover an A to Z of documentary production, and discuss what a successful producer’s role is at every stage of a film’s life. Learn more at nofilmschool.com.
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55 min
November 22, 2017
IFW 11.23.17: How the FCC is Screwing Filmmakers & Your Best Black Friday Deals
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine discuss discuss what the FCC's recent actions on Net Neutrality and the 600mhz band mean for filmmakers, along with the most bizarre and heartbreaking turns in the avalanche of sexual misconduct stories and how they're affecting productions everywhere. In gear news, we reveal some of the best Black Friday discounts for filmmakers. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about color grading for different outputs. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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42 min
November 17, 2017
How Do You Know if One Character Can Carry Your Whole Movie?
No Film School’s Liz Nord is joined by three directors who have taken on the challenge of telling character-based stories where their films center around the personal journeys of one or a small handful of subjects. Their characters couldn’t be more different—one is the tough guy frontman of a New York hardcore band, one is the first female Sharia Law judge in Palestine, and one is a woman who has started a traveling circus of cats—but the lessons the filmmakers learned and advice they share is surprisingly similar and applies to any filmmaker trying to tell a good story. Erika Cohn ('The Judge'), Ian McFarland ('Godfathers of Hardcore'), and Jacob Feiring ('Samantha’s Amazing Acrocats'), discuss how they pulled off their impressive films, and the bravery it takes to embark on such a project both behind and in front of the camera.
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48 min
November 16, 2017
IFW 11.16.17: How to Make Your Old Footage Look Great & Cash in with Kickstarter's Answer to Patreon
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss Drip, Kickstarter's bold new move for filmmakers, plus a field report from DOC NYC that reveals why it's become the American documentary festival to pay attention to. We also cover the first Oscars handed out this year, marvel at Agnes Varda's infinite wisdom, and say farewell to Oscar-winning filmmaker Debra Chasnoff, who died last week. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including the new Lumix G9 from Panasonic, and answers an Ask No Film School question about the best way to up-res VHS footage. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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42 min
November 13, 2017
How Niche Filmmaking Can Move Your Filmmaking Career Ahead
We all know that getting your first film made is hard. With the added pressure of expectation, getting a second made can be even harder. And then there are the Julie Cohens of the world. Cohen is a documentary filmmaker who has completed and distributed 8 feature docs and 5 shorts in the past ten years, and won three Emmys along the way. And this is after a prolific career as a producer at NBC, where she produced more than 20 hour-long and two-hour programs for Dateline. Cohen’s latest, available on iTunes now just in time for Veteran’s Day, is called AMERICAN VETERAN. It tells the story of Army Sergeant Nick Mendes, who was paralyzed from the neck down by a massive improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in 2011, when he was 21. Liz Nord sits down with Cohen to discuss tips on speeding up production, how to reach niche audiences to market your work, and steps for sustaining your career in this unpredictable business.
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52 min
November 6, 2017
How To Shoot Where You're Not Allowed
What happens when the community you’re filming doesn’t want you there? That is exactly the dilemma that faced celebrated documentarians Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady when they embarked on their latest project, the Netflix Original film 'One of Us'. The directing duo returns to the territory that garnered them an Oscar nomination in 2007 for 'Jesus Camp': extreme religious sects in America. In 'One of Us', we travel far from the rural Evangelical Christian summer camps of Jesus Camp to a very different world: the insular Hasidic Jewish community in Brooklyn, New York. The film focuses on three young people attempting to leave the community despite threats of retaliation. They are at different stages of separation but each is struggling to join mainstream America after having been raised strictly following daily religious mandates, speaking Yiddish, and with virtually no secular education. Because of sensitivities around their subjects and the community at large, Ewing, Grady and their cinematographers, Jenni Morello and Alex Takats, had to to develop all kinds of tactics and strategies for shooting very inconspicuously. Both the directors and DPs join No Film School's Liz Nord on this episode to discuss how they managed to film and craft such a sympathetic tale from within a notoriously closed community.
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33 min
October 30, 2017
Hitchcock 101: Everything You've Ever Wanted to Know About Psycho
Have you ever been at one of those parties where people talk about movies and Hitchcock comes up, but you’ve never seen any Hitchcock? So then you get all sweaty and start avoiding people’s gaze? It feels like everyone is watching you, the world is slowly closing in and you get so claustrophobic and insane that you feel like you want to scream? Us neither. Funnily enough, the experience of watching Psycho for the first time feels exactly the same way. So now that you know what you’re in for, it’s time to stop making excuses and just watch it. Right now. Or rather, after you’ve listened to this podcast and before you go see Alexandre Phillipe’s illuminating documentary 78/52. This documentary defies the mere convention of looking back at an entire filmmaker’s career and it takes an even deeper focus than just examining one film. Instead, Phillipe focuses on one scene. Psycho’s infamous shower scene, which had 78 camera setups, 52 cuts and took seven days to shoot. In many ways, examining this one scene provides us with more insight on Hitchcock’s filmmaking than if we were to look at his resume as a whole. Jon Fusco sits down with Phillipe to discuss Hitchcock’s legacy, what Psycho has to say about his tendencies as a filmmaker, and plenty more interesting facts that will place you firmly in the realm of Hitchcock expert.
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36 min
October 26, 2017
IFW 10.26.17: Halloween Spooktacular II - Advice for the Aspiring Horror Auteur
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine get in the mood for Halloween by sharing some of No Film School's best horror filmmaking tips from the likes of Jeremy Saulnier and Rob Zombie. We discuss a lens so good that it got its own Emmy (plus this year's other Engineering Emmy winners) and why there's an uncertain future for Amazon Studios. We also say a sad goodbye to Oscar-winning cinematographer Walter Lassally. Gear news includes Sony's 42 megapixel beast, the a7R III, and Charles answers Liz's Ask No Film School question about migrating a project from FCP6 to Premiere. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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40 min
October 23, 2017
How to Master the Art of Satire: Ruben Östlund on 'The Square'
Ruben Östlund has never been one to shy away from difficult themes. That's not to say that the themes he presents his audiences are controversial or difficult to watch. It's more that they're difficult to fully comprehend. Östlund's ability to translate his thoughts to screen, however, is unrivaled among his contemporaries. "The Square" is certainly one of these pictures. Östlund explores what exactly the concept of 'trust' means in a modern society where paranoia is the dominant human emotion and catastrophe seems to await us around every new corner. The Palmes d' Or winning film centers on Christian, a curator at a renowned modern art museum in Sweden. One day he is robbed in blind daylight and his ensuing decision to track down the thieves sets off a series of events that cause his life to descend into chaos. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with Östlund at the New York Film Festival to discuss his mind-bending new feature. They cover everything from how to make a two-and-a-half hour movie breeze by at a lightspeed pace to what Östlund (a teacher himself) feels is the most important part of film school.
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19 min
October 19, 2017
IFW 10.19.17: Welcome to a Post-Harvey Hollywood & Your Best Bet for a 360° Stereo Camera
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine predict what the Harvey Weinstein fallout could means for future film sets and discuss some steps being taken by the Academy, the PGA, and other film institutions to combat sexual misconduct in the industry. We also share a ton of news from Netflix, including the company's plans to release 80 original films in 2018. In gear news, we reveal how filmmakers can use Microsoft's new GPU, and Charles answers an Ask No Film School question about renting a 360 stereoscopic camera. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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43 min
October 16, 2017
Spielberg: Behind the Scenes with the World’s Most Famous Filmmaker
Steven Spielberg is the highest grossing directors of all time, with over 50 influential titles under his belt. And yet, do we really know Spielberg? After all, he rarely does public appearances or gives in-depth interviews. Perhaps the director was just waiting for the right moment to tell his life’s story and the right person to tell it to. Fortunately, that time has come, and that person is our guest, Susan Lacy. As executive producer of the PBS series American Masters, she produced 250 films exploring the lives of America’s most influential cultural icons. For the new HBO documentary ‘Spielberg', she turned her hand to directing. Lacy interviewed Steven Spielberg for over 30 hours collectively, skillfully pulling out threads from his own life to weave together the film’s thesis: though he’s not known as a “personal filmmaker", there’s a part of Spielberg in every film he makes. In this episode Susan Lacy joins No Film School’s Liz Nord and the film’s editor, Deborah Peretz, to discuss how they managed decades-worth of archival and new interview material, and what they learned from Spielberg and his movies in making this one.
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35 min
October 12, 2017
IFW 10.12.17: Two Cameras with Unprecedented Resolution & Must-Sees from the New York Film Festival
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse accusations and what they mean for indie film, share highlights from our New York Film Festival coverage including conversations with Richard Linklater and Sean Baker, and ponder what exactly is the future of storytelling. In gear news, RED has finally released its Monstro sensor and DJI has released its highest resolution drone cinema camera yet. DP Open Soffer joins us to answer an Ask No Film School question about how to shoot dialog scenes. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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34 min
October 9, 2017
'The Florida Project': Sean Baker on Why You Need to Invest in Yourself When No One Else Will
"The Florida Project" may be the first Sean Baker movie you'll go out to see in theaters, but he's been on the scene for a long, long time. Perhaps best known for the iPhone 5s filmed "Tangerine", Baker has been a champion of low-budget filmmaking for his entire career. More so than that, he has been a trailblazer in the democratization of film. Inspired by the Dogme 95 movement pioneered by Danish directors Lars von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg, he makes the absolute best use of the resources that are available to him. "Take Out", "The Prince of Broadway" and, yes, "Tangerine" were all shot on minuscule budgets with minimal crew and whatever gear they could afford to shoot on. His latest film, "The Florida Project", breaks this trend but keeps the Dogme 95 spirit well alive. It’s his first film to be granted a million dollar budget and shot on 35mm every frame oozes with beauty. The film is set over one summer in Celebration, Florida (the home of DisneyWorld) and follows the everyday adventures of precocious 6-year-old Moonee, a child whose mother lives month to month in a motel and does some less than favorable things to make rent. Baker and No Film School's Jon Fusco discuss the director's long road through obscurity, the level of discipline every filmmaker should aspire to own, and how even when no one else believes in you, you can still believe in yourself.
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32 min
October 5, 2017
IFW 10.5.17: The Future of Buying and Selling Lenses & The Best Screenwriters of All Time
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine discuss Vulture’s list of the Top 100 Screenwriters of All Time, a new online marketplace for lenses, an indie distributor making bold moves, and how one filmmaker is changing the entire advertising industry. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about whether or not you need to buy a cage for your small camera. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, a slew of new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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45 min
October 2, 2017
What is a Film Fellowship and Why Should You Do One?
Three directors who have been invited to and attended some of the most elite labs and fellowships in the business join No Film School's Liz Nord to define pitch forums, labs, retreats, and fellowships, and let other filmmakers know why participation in these opportunities can be extremely rewarding. Guests Sierra Pettengill ('The Reagan Show'), Sabaah Folayan ('Whose Streets’), and Jeff Unay (‘Cage Fighter’) share their own filmmaking journies and pitching processes, and also elaborate the value of fellowships to anyone trying to get a film made—everything from relationships to mentorship to feedback to simply having space to cry.
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51 min
September 28, 2017
IFW 9.28.17: The Next Hottest Rental Camera & It's Time to Stop Putting Lives at Risk on Set
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine discuss the lifesaving info that every filmmaker can learn from recent Radiohead and NARCOS shoots, and a dirty debacle threatening the beloved indie institutions in the Alamo Drafthouse family. In gear news, we get a first look at Sony’s full-frame VENICE, and we answer an Ask No Film School question about what you can do in 8K that you can’t do in four. As always, we also bring you the latest filmmaking tools, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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39 min
September 25, 2017
Pitching Do's and Don’ts: How to Get Your Film Funded
This week’s guests have heard over 10,000 pitches between them and, in this episode, they reveal what works and what doesn't when you're trying to raise money for your films. No Film School’s Liz Nord is joined by Molly O’Brien (Chief Business Development Officer of Fork Films), Daniel Chalfen (Co-founder of Naked Edge Films), and Jose Rodriguez (Director of Documentary Programs at the Tribeca Film Institute) to discuss the art of the pitch.
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34 min
September 21, 2017
IFW 9.21.17: Why Your Film Isn't Getting into Festivals & Tips From a Guerrilla Filmmaking Legend
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Jon Fusco discuss why the Emmys are actually worth noticing this year and what we should make of all the hubbub around Darren Aronofsky’s latest film, ‘mother!’. We also share wrap-ups from the Toronto and Camden International Film Festivals, including the movie made with 10,000 hours of surveillance footage. In Ask No Film School, we answer the perennial question of why your film isn’t getting into festivals. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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37 min
September 18, 2017
How To Keep Your Production Running Smoothly Across Every Medium
Why do theater when you can do film? Why do film when you can do theater? Why do one when you can do both? Why do both when you can do VR? Director Dan Hasse and director/actor Taylor Myers are an ambitious pair of artists based in New York City who grappled with these pressing questions at length before finally coming to a conclusion. The answer? Just do all three. The duo went abroad earlier this year after conceiving the idea to fly to Ireland, rent a castle, and perform an immersive theater adaptation of Shakespeare’s immortal play Hamlet. Then they thought, well why would we limit this experience to just a few people? So the theater makers, brought along a crew and decided to become filmmakers as well. The result is Hamlet in the Golden Vale, a feature-length film that will be appearing on the festival circuit next year. All of this output from a single independent film production is made even more impressive considering that In the process, they also managed to secure funding for a companion VR piece as well. Dan and Taylor sit down with No Film School Producer Jon Fusco to discuss their multi-pronged effort to make the most of their eleven days in Ireland and the difficulties in translating from stage to the screen in all different aspects of production. From screenwriting to acting to directing they share a few tips on how to keep things running smoothly across every medium.
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41 min
September 14, 2017
IFW 9.14.17: All Things Apple & Panasonic's Surprisingly Affordable New Camera
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine bring you a fall gear preview. We discuss all the latest gear news coming out of Amsterdam's IBC expo, including more details of Panasonic's EVA-1 and major Resolve upgrades, plus the multiple Apple announcements made at the company's annual launch event and how they affect indie filmmakers. We also cover a bevy of indie acquisition news out of TIFF, Louis CK’s top-secret DIY movie, the Creative Arts Emmys, and Disney's latest Star Wars shakeup. As always, the show also brings Ask No Film School, plus news you can use about upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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41 min
September 11, 2017
How a 4-Day Journalism Assignment Became an Explosive Yearlong Doc Production
When Israeli journalist Maya Zinshtein took on a four-day assignment to cover the arrival of two foreign players to a local soccer club, she had no idea that it would turn into a year-long making of a feature documentary that dramatically reveals the skeletons in her own country’s closet. But this was no ordinary soccer team—and this is certainly not your average sports documentary. The team at the center of the film is Beitar Jerusalem, which had been historically known for the right wing politics and even racist tendencies of its fan base. In fact, It was the only team in Israel’s premier league never to sign an Arab player. When two Muslim players from Chechnya were brought onto the team, the resulting backlash exposed the ugliest parts of Israeli society, and threatened to tear the team and country apart. Rarely does a documentary—especially about something as apparently innocuous as soccer—expose so many layers of one society, from race to class to politics to economics. But it didn’t come without Zinshtein’s own battles. In her conversation with No Film School's Liz Nord, she is very candid about how she overcame the challenges she faced making the film, especially in trying to convince people to let her turn vérité cameras on them in the midst of personal and national crises.
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30 min
September 7, 2017
IFW 9.7.17: From Werner Herzog to Barry Jenkins: Best Advice from Over 50 Filmmaker Interviews
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder jump into fall festival season with reports from Venice, Telluride, and TIFF. We also share some positive financial news for indies against the backdrop of the summer blockbuster fail. For her very last episode ever, Emily shares a compendium of all the best filmmaking advice she's received from dozens of interviews with groundbreaking filmmakers. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including the world's highest capacity microSD card, and answers a pressing Ask No Film School question about lens adapters and flange focal distance. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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50 min
September 4, 2017
'Expect That Everything Will Go Wrong': How to Ensure Your First Short Film is the Best it Can Be
Making a short should be an easy thing, right? That’s what No Film School Producer/Editor Jon Fusco thought when he decided he would finally shoot his own. He was wrong. Making any film, no matter the length is certain to be an ordeal. In both pre-production and on set, many more things are bound to go wrong than right. Fusco sits down with award-winning short director Hughes William Thompson to discuss some of the more common struggles first-time filmmakers face and the steps that you can take to ensure your production goes as smooth as possible.
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39 min
August 31, 2017
IFW 8.31.17: The Best Way to Choose an Anamorphic Lens & Who Rules the Indie Box Office?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine reveal the best anamorphic lens test we've ever seen and ponder the future of indie stalwart Fox Searchlight. We also discuss how one actor is proving that Hollywood really can change how it does casting, and say a sad goodbye to influential horror director Tobe Hooper. In gear news, we discuss ShareGrid's comprehensive new anamorphic lens test, and Charles answers an Ask No Film School question about how to best pull off a multi-user workflow in post-production. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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41 min
August 28, 2017
What to Do When You've Lost All Hope for Your Film
Director Janicza Bravo and actor Brett Gelman were 'covered in blood' while trying to get their film ‘LEMON’ made, but now it's theatrically released by Magnolia Pictures. The pair are rising stars in both TV and independent film—she directed a Sundance-winning short and an episode of Emmy-winning ‘Atlanta’ and he has appeared in dozens of shows and his own Adult Swim comedy specials—but ‘LEMON’ was born out of the same creative frustrations and anxiety that plague the rest of us. The real-life married couple co-wrote the film, which Janicza directed. In it, Brett plays Isaac, a bit of an unlikable sad sack in the middle of one of life’s downward spirals. In this episode, No Film School’s Liz Nord sits down with the couple on the night before the film's New York premiere, and they share very candid details about the six-year struggle to get the film made, how they overcame each hurdle, and how the industry actually works.
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41 min
August 24, 2017
IFW 8.24.17: The Death of Final Cut 7 & Indie Film's Sex Abuse Scandal
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss the CineFamily controversy that's shaking up LA's underground film scene, how much cash exactly is made by the films of top-grossing indie directors, and an update on last week's record-breaking story about whether or not MoviePass will mean the end of theater-going as we know it. We also say sad goodbyes to editor Eric Zumbrunnen, comedian and filmmaker Jerry Lewis, and the print edition of the Village Voice. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including the death of Final Cut 7, and answers an Ask No Film School question about how to create a fog effect in your film. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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39 min
August 21, 2017
The First Family of DIY on How to ‘Make Your Own Damn Movie'
The reigning families of modern American movies are household names: the Coppolas, the Gyllenhaals, the Afflecks. But what about the Kaufmans? If you are a filmmaker, they have very likely affected your life. Dad is Lloyd Kaufman, creator of the Toxic Avenger and king of B-movies, whose independent studio Troma Entertainment has produced and distributed more than 1,000 films. Mom is Pat Swinney Kaufman, who was the deputy film commissioner for New York State for 20 years. Their daughter is Lisbeth Kaufman, co-founder of KitSplit, which is now the biggest online camera rental company. Liz Nord speaks with the family and between the three of them, there’s a veritable treasure trove of industry gold.
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43 min
August 17, 2017
IFW 8.17.17: 8K is a Lie & Will the Controversial Plan to Make Movies Cheap Actually Kill Them?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder ponder whether or not cameras have reached peak resolution, and debate the merits of MoviePass’s new plan to let you see unlimited movies in theaters for $10 a month. We also discuss Facebook's aim to become the new YouTube and Apple's billion-dollar content investment. I answer an Ask No Film School question about what the heck to do with your short film once it's finished, and we hear from the Safdie Brothers about their new film ‘Good Time’, which opens in theaters this week. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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41 min
August 14, 2017
Why Making a Film is the Only Thing That Can Ever Really Prepare You for Making Your First Film
The quality of this summer’s offering of independent films has just been utterly ridiculous. There have already been so many new voices, new perspectives, and unique stories hitting the big screen and now we can add Matt Spicer’s Ingrid Goes West to the list as yet another standout title. The film, which earned the coveted Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at Sundance follows Ingrid Thorburn, an unhinged social media stalker, frenetically brought to life by Aubrey Plaza, who moves to LA in an attempt to make friends with her latest obsession, the boho-chic social media influencer, Taylor Sloane, a character that’s oh-so convincingly played by Elizabeth Olson. Even with a hilarious cast and chuckle-worthy premise, it's hard to call Ingrid Goes West a comedy, in the truest sense of the word, because, well, it is really, really, creepy. The disturbing tone carefully planted beneath the film's shimmering Los Angeles foreground will stick with you long after you've left the theater. For Spicer, who penned the film along with David Branson Smith, this was the culmination of a ten-year journey from screenwriter to director. He joins us this week to discuss the steps he took to make this film happen, the pros and cons of social media’s new role in the film industry, and how making a film is the only thing that can ever really prepare you for making a film.
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28 min
August 10, 2017
IFW 8.10.17: Best Tripods for Your Budget & The Academy's Surprise President
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco,and Emily Buder discuss two new and very different industry studies: one about the use of swear words in movies, and the other about the future of the documentary film industry. We also talk about the new President of the Academy of Motion Pictures, updates from the Locarno, TIFF and NYFF festivals, and Netflix’s first acquisition of another company. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including the Panasonic EVA-1 specs and an embarrassing moment for Apple. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about how to assess and buy tripods in a range of budgets. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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38 min
August 7, 2017
The Worst Things a Director Can Do on Set
The experienced cast of ‘In the Radiant City’ joins No Film School’s Liz Nord to dish on how (and how not) to direct actors. 'In the Radiant City’ is directed by Jeff Nichols protégé Rachel Lambert and co-written by Lambert and Nathan Gregorski. The film is a quiet but very tense family drama about a man who testified against his brother in a murder trial when they were kids, and his return to their rural Kentucky hometown twenty years later to face the family that was left behind. Its talented ensemble cast includes Marin Ireland ('Hell or High Water’), Michael Abbott Jr. (‘Loving'), Madisen Beaty ('The Master'), and Celia Weston, who has over 60 credits to her name but may be best recognized as Barb Tucker from 'Modern Family.’ On this lively episode, that entire group, plus Lambert and Gregorski, discuss what you should *not* do on set as much as they give constructive tips for directing actors. Lambert also shares the details of how she got her debut feature off the ground, including great advice like "Get to know every goddam bartender in the area,” as well as the most important things she learned from mentor Jeff Nichols, who produced the film.
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39 min
August 3, 2017
IFW 8.3.17: The Demise of DSLR & Soderbergh's Plan to Save Movies
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco,and Emily Buder wonder if DSLR filmmaking is finally dead, and whether Soderbergh's new production model can revive indies. We also discuss a former Google Android exec who extols iPhone filmmaking, Netflix's $20.5 billion in debt, and say a sad goodbye to Pulitzer-Winning writer, director, and actor Sam Shepard. We hear from video essay guru Kogonada about his debut feature ‘Columbus,’ which hits theaters this week. In gear news, Fusion gets a VR toolset and big price break, the TSA adds filmmaker-unfriendly travel rules, and lens mount options grow for the Fujfilm MK zooms. Ask No Film School fields a question about what extent you should involve an author in your film when it's based on their book. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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38 min
July 31, 2017
How Stupid Videos Led to a $5 Million Deal For 'Brigsby Bear' & An 11 Year Trip to 'Killing Ground'
Back at Sundance, No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with a few of the teams behind a few of this summer's best independent films while they were still fresh off their premiere highs. Brigsby Bear, which came out July 28, obtained a $5 million deal from Sony Pictures Classic for Distribution rights. Director Dave McCary and screenwriter Kevin Costello join the podcast to discuss the journey each of them took to get that deal. From stupid YouTube sketches with their comedy group Good Neighbor to Saturday Night Live Digital Shorts and now full-length features, their process is a great model for collaborative filmmaking. Through a lethal combination of non-linear storytelling, gender reversals, and Deliverance type thrills, director Damien Power successfully toys with audience expectations all the way throughout his debut feature, Killing Ground, which we might add took 11 years to make. We discussed how Australia's film scene helps to foster artists who take greater risks, the lengths Power went to to get his film made, and the strategies he put in place to create the script for Sundance's most mind-bending horror film.
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33 min
July 27, 2017
IFW 7.27.17: How to Break into Modern Hollywood & The Latest DSLR Fail
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss the new rules for breaking into Hollywood and why "constantly reminding people you exist is now part of the job." We also share what we learned from last week's Comic-Con and the 38th News and Docs Emmy nominations, which were announced this week. We bid farewell to both Adobe Flash and the YouTube editing tool. Our rundown of this week's indie film releases is particularly robust, with no less than six festival favorites hitting theaters. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including Canon's latest camera fail, and answers an Ask No Film School inquiry about the differences between online and offline editing. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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45 min
July 24, 2017
'Landline': How to Avoid Sophomore Slump and Make Your Second Feature
‘Landline’ co-writers, Director Gillan Robespierre and Producer Elisabeth Holm join No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss how they overcame the typical hurdles to get their second feature made and theatrically released. The pair first collaborated on 'Obvious Child', which premiered at Sundance 2014, where Holm won the Red Crown Producer’s Award, and went on to critical and audience acclaim and theatrical release. They joined efforts again for ‘Landline', which was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance 2017 and opened in theaters last Friday. In this episode, Robespierre and Holm talk about how they avoided the "Sophomore slump", writing authentic dialog and getting equally authentic performances out of your actors, and how filmmaking is like polyamory.
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36 min
July 20, 2017
IFW 7.20.17: The Dangers of Being on Set & Best Advice from Summer's Top Indie Directors
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco,and Emily Buder discuss George Romero's DIY Legacy, what filmmakers should note about last week's Emmy nominations, and a trio of stories about crucial on-set safety issues. We also share the best advice we've gotten from some of summer's biggest indie directors, and hear from ‘Killing Ground’ director Damien Power about his 11-year journey to get his newly released film made. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, and answers an Ask No Film School question about whether your production company should accept credit cards. As always, we also bring you the latest upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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41 min
July 17, 2017
Flying Lotus on How Rejecting Film School Made Him a Greater Director
You may know Steve Ellison better by his beat-making alias Flying Lotus, or perhaps even as Flying Lotus' MC alias, Captain Murphy. Music, however, was not his first love. The director, who now simply goes by "Steve" actually went to film school far before he laid down his first mixtape. Just don't call him a product of the cinematic education system. Steve's debut feature Kuso truly goes against every single rule his teachers may have taught him back in his days as a student. In fact, Steve says he had to consciously take some time off to unlearn film school, where he believes things were taught to be done in a certain, almost factory-like way. He is a staunch believer that if you limit yourself to what you learn there, you may miss out on crucial organic discoveries. Instead, Kuso plays out more like his music: free-form, chaotic, jazz-like. It is comprised of four horrifying shorts, woven together, but separated by a series of animated hip-hop freak-outs that, when put together, form some sort of grotesque psychedelic tapestry. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with Steve to talk about what scares him about being a filmmaker, erasing all self-doubt, and jumping into your first project with a punk rock, let's do this attitude. 
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26 min
July 13, 2017
IFW 7.13.17: Russia's Plot to Kill Indies & RED's Hype Machine
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco,and Emily Buder discuss how even indie movies aren't safe from Russian interference, updates in the indie box office, the battle to save net neutrality, and a too-early goodbye to actor Nelsan Ellis. We also hear from director David Lowery about the challenges of making his summer indie hit ‘A Ghost Story.’ Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including RED’s incessant product teases and a TV that might replace movie screens for good. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about which affordable monitors to buy. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, new indie film releases, weekly words of industry wisdom, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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33 min
July 10, 2017
Nathan Silver on How a Director Can Pull off Making 8 Films in 8 Years
No Film School's Emily Buder sits down with prolific indie filmmaker Nathan Silver and the stars of his latest movie, Thirst Street, Lindsay Burdge and Damien Bonnard. Silver has made a movie every year for the past 8 years. Last year, he had the film Actor Martinez at Tribeca. Needless to say, Silver is a staple in the New York indie film scene. In their conversation, they discuss how Silver manages to get his micro-budget projects off the ground, some tips for shooting with limited resources, Thirst Street's distinctive '70s psychodrama aesthetic, and the extreme emotional risks some of the main actors had to take for their roles.
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43 min
July 6, 2017
IFW 7.6.17: Canon's Big Misstep & Is Rotten Tomatoes Ruining Moviegoing?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, Emily Buder, Jon Fusco and Charles Haine discuss Hollywood studios' beef with Rotten Tomatoes and what the highest-grossing films of the year so far have to do with it all. They also talk about Canon's latest misfire with the 6D Mark II, Christopher Nolan's 70mm Dunkirk release, and Emily's favorite movie of the year thus far: David Lowery's A Ghost Story.
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35 min
July 3, 2017
This Director Proves Everyone Can Act, If Only Given the Right Character
When Liz Nord spoke with first time Palestinian filmmaker Maysaloun Hamoud back at the Toronto International Film Festival last year, her narrative feature In Between (or Bar Bahar in Arabic) was just about to premiere. As with any new director, she had no idea what the response would be or what the coming year would bring. But her film’s path has been particularly unpredictable, leading to three awards in San Sebastian, Hamoud being hand-chosen by Isabelle Huppert to receive the Young Talents Award at Cannes, and being issued the first religious Fatwa in Palestinian history. In their fascinating conversation, Hamoud shares her methods for trying to make audiences see themselves in her characters, working with non-actors, and what it was like to make the first film of its kind in her community.
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25 min
June 29, 2017
IFW 6.29.17: Star Wars' Systemic Problem & How to Avoid Getting Hacked
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Charles Haine and Emily Buder discuss the real problem with Lucasfilm's firing of Lord & Miller, and how to protect yourself from a cyberattack. We also reveal why a promising streaming subscription was killed before it even had a chance to live, and why you might never see Albert Maysles’ final film. In Ask No Film School, we outline the best color grading software for Premiere Pro. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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37 min
June 26, 2017
How Starting a Production Company Can Help You Make Your First Film
Ashley McKenzie is the type of director that does it all. The Canadian multi-hyphenate runs her own production company, writes her own scripts, and directs all of the company's films. When she’s on set, however, she gives up almost all notions of planning and control to make her shots as organic and in the moment as possible. For her debut feature, Werewolf, which has won awards at almost every regional Canadian festival she’s brought it to, this included throwing the actors into real-life situations, adding events into scenes without telling them, keeping the camera rolling after the scene had cut, and even casting non-actors as key characters at locations on the fly. The film itself follows a pair of outcast methadone users who push a rusty lawnmower door-to-door to cut grass for money to feed their addiction. No Film School’s Jon Fusco sat down with McKenzie and her two lead actors Andrew Gillis and Breagh MacNeil to discuss their intensely real collaboration.
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25 min
June 22, 2017
IFW 6.22.17: Why You Should Go to Film School & How to Rent Your Gear for Profit
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine weigh the benefits of film school against its rising cost, and debates the merits of renting out your own gear. We share some fun facts about the crossover between TV directors and the year's biggest films, say a (possibly temporary) farewell to one of the world's greatest actors, and discuss whether or not Apple is finally a serious contender in the original content game with its latest hires. What’s more, we discuss the Canon and Sony summer gear rumors, and hear from ‘Wonder Woman’ DP Matt Jensen about the differences between shooting for action and drama. As always, we bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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36 min
June 19, 2017
How to Tap into Your Animalistic Filmmaking Instincts and Become a 'Bitch'
We saw a lot of movies in the Midnight Section at Sundance this year. There were a lot of weird movies. 'Bitch,' however, is a batshit insane movie. In terms of understanding what we’re dealing with here, the premise really only gets you half the way there: an underappreciated mother finds out her jerk-off husband is cheating on her and as a result, well, she turns into a dog. The real insanity, however, comes across in a near constant destruction of genre conventions. Is it a horror? Is it a comedy? Is it a relationship drama? At times it’s all of these things all together, at times it is very clearly just one. Marianna Palka wrote the script in just two days, which aside from being a remarkable achievement, is a testament to the free-wheeling nature of the film itself. She also directs and stars in the film. At Sundance, NFS Producer Jon Fusco was joined by Emily Buder, Palka, and actor/musician Zack Clark to discuss Palka’s unrivaled writing technique and the benefits of being a multi-hyphenate. If you're in New York you can check out Bitch at BAM CinemaFest this week.
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21 min
June 15, 2017
IFW 6.15.17: What to Look for in a Budget Lens & Why David Mamet is Anti-Film School
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss the new coalition that has longtime rivals HBO and Netflix joining forces, why producers are losing money, and a new digital filmmaking initiative in LA. Charles Haine joins us for gear news and answers an Ask No Film School question about how to buy good lenses on a budget. In Weekly Words of Wisdom, we share tips from Steven Spielberg, Game of Thrones costume designer Michele Clapton, and David Mamet himself on the three best ways to learn filmmaking. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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31 min
June 12, 2017
How to Make an Authentic Movie About Someone Else's Story
The Emmy award-winning co-directors of Berlinale premiere ‘For Ahkeem', Jeremy S. Levine and Landon Van Soest, and one of the film’s producers, Iyabo Boyd, join No Film School’s Liz Nord for a frank and fascinating discussion about how to overcome the challenges inherent in telling the story of someone whose background is entirely different from your own. In this case, the film’s co-directors are two, middle-class white men from New York City, and their subject is a charismatic, 17-year-old African-American girl named Daje Shelton from outside of Ferguson, Missouri, where fellow black teenager Michael Brown had been famously shot and killed by police. In order to authentically portray this story as outsiders, Levine and Van Soest made Shelton a partner in the filmmaking process, and diversified the larger crew of people working on their film, including Boyd, their female, African-American producer.
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34 min
June 8, 2017
IFW 6.8.17: Hollywood's Dark Overlord & Panasonic's Race for Indie Dominance
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss the camera that Panasonic hopes will win back indie DPs, and the threat holding Hollywood ransom. We also uncover the indie heart of the Wonder Woman phenomenon, and how its director Patty Jenkins' next move is coming directly to a niche streaming service near you. The episode goes into Apple's first original program, and says goodbye to Peter Sallis, the voice of Wallace from the ‘Wallace and Gromit’ films and a true supporter of independent filmmakers. Charles Haine joins us for an update from the Cine Gear Expo—including Panasonic's EVA1—and more gear news. In Ask No Film School, Elise McCave from Kickstarter shares some do's and don'ts for crowdfunding your film. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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44 min
June 5, 2017
How to Avoid the Crucial Mistakes Everyone Makes on their First Movie
At Tribeca, No Film School's Emily Buder sat down with first time director Sophie Brooks and her producer, David Brooks, who also happens to be her brother. Their film The Boy Downstairs went through a very well structured series of steps to prepare it for a premiere at a major festival. The duo talk the strategies they put in place to prevent Sophie from making the same mistakes any other first-time director would make. From test screenings to re-writes, they share some great tips that you can borrow on the lead up to your own future releases.
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49 min
June 1, 2017
IFW 6.1.17: Canon's Leaked Camera & Why the Judges Cried at Cannes
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder reveal the film that got Jessica Chastain and Pedro Almodovar teary-eyed at Cannes, and a lot more about the best and worst of the world's pre-eminent film festival from this year. We also discuss Canon's latest offering—an affordable camera whose specs were leaked ahead of this week's Cine Gear Expo in Los Angeles. In Ask No Film School, we share some tips on finding a job in the film industry. As always, we also bring you this week’s indie film releases, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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42 min
May 29, 2017
How Do You Know if Your Film is Porn or Art?
'Flames' co-directors Josephine Decker and Zefrey Throwell waded into the most intimate waters with Ashley Connor, the DP who filmed them having sex. The threesome joins No Film School’s Liz Nord to discuss their provocative film—an art-docu-fiction-softcore porn-hybrid about Decker and Throwell's real-life relationship and its aftermath—after its Tribeca premiere. The conversation includes the fine line between porn and art, what happens when you add a third person and their camera to your relationship, how they managed to make a cinematic-looking film on the 5D, and so much more.
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33 min
May 25, 2017
IFW 5.25.17: How to Keep Your Actors in the Moment & Where Not to Pitch Your Project
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco and Charles Haine divulge how to get the most authentic performances out of your actors, and how this year’s television NewFronts affect indie filmmakers. We also discuss an alternative to YouTube where you might actually get paid for your work, and share advice for directors, producers and cinematographers from industry pros in our newest segment: Weekly Words of Wisdom. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com. http://nofilmschool.com/2017/05/indie-film-weekly-052517-podcast
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35 min
May 22, 2017
Divide and Conquer: Why You Should be Working With a Co-Director
Brothers Eshom and Ian Nelms come from humble beginnings. Neither went to film school, instead, they learned from going out and shooting a lot of bad stuff. Their first feature, Squirrel Trap, may be the perfect example. Shot for $1500 in the woods behind their parent's house, their crew consisted of only three people. Their father lit the whole thing with a flashlight and a bounce board. After submitting to a ton of festivals, they only were accepted to about four or five. Things are much different now, to say the least. Their latest film Small Town Crime, was one of the buzziest films at SXSW this year. It's a sterling entry into a resurgent neo-noir genre, which stars John Hawkes as an alcoholic ex-cop who finds the body of a young woman and becomes hell-bent on finding the killer. Much of the duo's success can be credited to the fact that they are just that, a duo. Each acts as the yin to the other's yang with different skillsets and strong-suits, but they are able to maintain a synchronicity on-set that is much appreciated by the entirety of their crew. With a co-director at your side, you have the ability to delegate different jobs, divide and conquer, and possess an instant soundboard to shoot down or agree with your ideas. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with the directing duo as well as their recurring partner in cinematography, Johnny Derango, and composer Chris Westlake to discuss all the benefits of having a partner in crime on your film shoot.
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46 min
May 18, 2017
IFW 5.18.17: A Game-Changing Law for Freelancers & Are Indies Rising From the Blockbuster's Ashes?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Charles Haine wonder if the massive decline predicted for summer box office returns is a hidden boon for indie filmmakers. We also discuss the new rules that might affect every freelancer, new E-mount lenses from Sony, an obituary for the MP3, and why the war between Netflix and movie theaters rages on even at the Cannes Film Festival. In Ask No Film School, we reveal the best way to set up a 4:3 timeline (and whether you’d really want to). As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com. http://nofilmschool.com/2017/05/indie-film-weekly-051817-podcast
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37 min
May 15, 2017
How to Turn an On-Set Day Job Into Your Own Film
Renée Felice Smith and C.A. Gabriel, co-writers and directors of ‘The Relationtrip,’ join No Film School’s Liz Nord after the film’s SXSW premiere to discuss how they parlayed everything they’ve learned on other people’s sets (Smith as a lead actress on 'NCIS: Los Angeles' for eight seasons, and Gabriel as a commercial composer for high-profile brands) into their own utterly charming indie feature. They made the film with their best friends, and used low-budget practical effects to make their weirdest fantasies real on screen, including spending six whole hours out of a 16-day shoot on an eleven-second stop motion animation.
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39 min
May 11, 2017
IFW 5.11.17: How to Beat the Film Fest System & David Lynch Leaves Movies Behind Forever
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder introduce a filmmaker who learned how to tell whether festivals have actually watched his movie, and mourn the inimitable David Lynch's retirement from cinema. We also discuss what the annual Newfronts advertising presentations can tell you about where to pitch or sell your films, the closure of Facebook's VR production wing Oculus Story Studios, and whether or not other movie awards should follow in MTV's footsteps by eliminating gender-specific acting awards categories. Charles Haine joins us to report on the latest filmmaking tools, including a new wireless light meter that might change the way you evaluate a scene. Charles also answers an Ask No Film School question about the necessity of director's viewfinders. As always, we also bring you this week’s indie film releases, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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46 min
May 8, 2017
What to Expect on the Road to Becoming an Ace Documentary Producer
What does it take to be a fantastic documentary producer? From sitting in a ditch in Greenland’s below freezing weather, to pulling out an intensely personal story from a cut that may be a few hours too long, experienced producers Kate McLean and Glen Zipper embody the sort of intrepid attitude that a producer on a non-fiction film tends to need. What exactly does a documentary producer do, and why become one? No Film School's Oakley Anderson-Moore sat down with Kate and Glen at SXSW after the premieres of their latest respective films, Bill Nye Science Guy and Ramblin' Freak. Together they discuss the adventurous steps necessary to take on the role of an ace documentary producer.
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32 min
May 4, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 5.4.17: 'The Handmaid's Tale' Backlash & Is Tribeca Secretly a Doc Fest?
In this special festival episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Emily Buder ask whether the Tribeca Film Festival has a secret identity, and talk about why everyone is talking about 'The Handmaid's Tale.' We share tales and trivia from our on-the-ground coverage of Tribeca, including fest acquisitions, awards, dystopian premonitions, plant musicians and the most memorable festival films to look out for. We also discuss recent news outside of the festival bubble, including a major update on the Writers Guild of America negotiations, and a labor strike at camera stalwart B&H photo. As always, the show also brings news you can use about upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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34 min
May 1, 2017
John Carroll Lynch on How to Be the Director Your Actors Have Always Wanted
Chances are, you know John Carroll Lynch’s face even if you don’t know his name. The actor, whose perhaps best known for his role as the Zodiac killer in David Fincher’s Zodiac, has a staggering 110 acting credits to his name. At this year’s SXSW, Lynch finally added another role to his resume: Director. His debut feature, Lucky, stars the legendary Harry Dean Stanton, another actor who is no slouch when it comes to having a prolific acting career. In fact, the ninety-year-old vet has amassed 199 acting credits to his name throughout his career. The film is a character study of an elderly, yet spirited atheist living in small town Texas. Lucky must come to terms with the fact that he may be in the midst of his last few years of life. Lynch has worked with some of the best directors of our age, a list that includes everyone from Fincher to Scorsese to Clint Eastwood. We talk the techniques he brought with him from his favorites of the bunch, the transition from actor to director, and what it's like directing David Lynch.
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29 min
April 27, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 4.27.17: Why This Year's NAB is the Most 'Terrifying' for Filmmakers Yet
In this special episode of Indie Film Weekly, Charles Haine, Micah Van Hove and Jon Fusco broadcast live from the historic Plaza Hotel in downtown Las Vegas. The trio of No Film School editors come together for a moment of solace to discuss a week of non-stop coverage at the annual NAB Show. What they identify is a worrying trend. Another year with no huge gear announcements and technological advances which signal the further automation of filmmaking. As cameras and accessories get more sophisticated, it appears that some human elements of filmmaking may be in jeopardy. It wasn't all bad though. Whatever news was missing from the usual suspects, the emergence of some smaller start-ups they found while exploring the halls of the convention center more than made up for it.
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35 min
April 24, 2017
How to Make the Jump from Lowly PA to Almighty Director
Adam Leon made only one short before breaking onto the indie scene with his SXSW winning debut feature Gimme the Loot. With a budget around $60,000 the writer/director won the "Someone To Watch" award at the Film Independent Spirits and was able to get his film into almost every notable film festival on the market, including a run in the Un Certain Regard competition at Cannes. How did he pull it off? Hard work and humble beginnings. Leon's work ethic was noticed on set as a PA and as a result of his efforts, he found collaborators and producers that were eager to invest in his future. His latest film, Tramps, debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival last summer and was quickly scooped up by Netflix. It follows a young man and woman as they are unwittingly thrown into the middle of a money drop off gone awry. But for Leon, the real challenge came in crafting a genuine romance without leaning on cliche. To achieve this goal, he turned to his writing partner and producer Jamund Washington early on in the development process. Leon and Washington join us on this week's episode of The No Film School Podcast to talk filmmaking as a collaborative art form, the right way to take notes on your screenplay, and finding partners that won't compromise your vision but help to build upon it.
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26 min
April 20, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 4.20.17: Tribeca Must-Sees & How to Create a DCP the Right Way
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco and Emily Buder get excited about the 16th edition of the Tribeca Film Festival opening this week, and discuss whether (finally!) Netflix might let us see its films in theaters. We also say goodbye to the genius cinematographer Michael Ballhaus and remember his storied career working with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Martin Scorsese, and Francis Ford Coppola. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to share more previews of the big NAB gear expo that starts this weekend. He also answers an Ask No Film School question about creating Digital Cinema Packages for your movie. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com http://nofilmschool.com/2017/04/indie-film-weekly-042017-podcast
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36 min
April 17, 2017
DP Roundtable: The Shots That Almost Killed Us
Three cinematographers with three very different films at SXSW 2017 discuss their favorite gear, what DPs can do to stand out off set, how they make room for their actors or subjects in vulnerable situations, and of course, the shoots that almost killed them. Guests include Autumn Eakin, who shot Jessica M. Thompson's realist, contemporary THE LIGHT OF THE MOON, which won the SXSW Narrative Feature Audience Award; James Axel West, who shot Adam Keleman’s stylish, ‘70s-referencing drama EASY LIVING; and Shane King, who shot Jennifer M. Kroot’s feature documentary THE UNTOLD TALES OF ARMISTEAD MAUPIN which won the SXSW Documentary Spotlight Audience Award.
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42 min
April 13, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 4.12.17: NAB Sneak Peek & What’s Shutting Down Hollywood
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord and Emily Buder discuss the strike that threatens to bring Hollywood to a halt, while a big move by Netflix attempts to bring a whole new life to production in Tinsel Town. Charles Haine joins us to disclose all of the drone rumors from this year’s upcoming NAB show, and answers an Ask No Film School question about what focal lengths to consider when buying prime lenses. We also talk about what the new Oscar eligibility rules mean for you, and hear from two directors of indie films that are being released this week: Joe Swanberg of ‘Win it All’ and Michael O'Shea of ‘The Transfiguration.’ As always, we bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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33 min
April 10, 2017
'DRIB': What Happens When Reality and Fiction Collide?
The docu-fiction hybrid genre isn't necessarily a new thing. In fact, there are some festivals that are entirely devoted to those films that blur the line between what is real and what is written. It's the liberties in which the filmmakers choose to blur the lines where the real magic shines through.   Kristoffer Borgli, director of the SXSW standout DRIB and guest on today's episode of The No Film School Podcast, didn't realize the full potential of the genre until he was halfway through making his film. He always knew he wanted to screw around with his audience, but to what extent?   DRIB is the true story of performance artist Amir Asgharnejad, a man who amassed a following through fake fight videos he would put up on the internet. For Amir, it was never about getting famous however, it was all just a joke. It seems the joke was lost on an LA based energy drink company who decided Amir would be the face of their new brand.    This is a film unlike any other, weaving together an embellished narrative of Amir's story, with real interviews discussing Amir's experience on which the narrative is based, and behind the scenes footage of what it was like making the film itself. If that sounds confusing. It's because it is. Oh yeah, and on top of all that, Amir stars as himself throughout the film's entirety.     NFS Producer Jon Fusco sat down with Kris, Amir and co-star Brett Gelman at SXSW to get some insight into the art of play and trickery.
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28 min
April 6, 2017
Where VR Has Never Gone Before: The 40 Minute Narrative Feature ‘Miyubi’
NFS Writer Oakley Anderson-Moore talks with the talented artists behind Felix & Paul studios, one of the leading VR production companies in the film world. The cinematic quality that is a hallmark of their projects is very uncommon in these rudimentary days of VR. Virtual reality has been excelling in the realm of documentary because exhibiting an immersive experience of a location goes almost hand in hand with that genre. With narrative VR, however, it’s been a harder nut to crack. How do you create a character arc in a 360 environment where viewers can look anywhere they want at any moment? It’s a challenge Felix & Paul take head on in their film "Miyubi," the story of a 1980s toy robot through whose eyes we watch a family grow up as he grows obsolete.
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32 min
April 3, 2017
What it Takes to Get Your Midnight Short into SXSW
When attending film festivals, there is no more exciting prospect than catching a screening of a midnights shorts section. These are generally made up of the strangest, and in many ways, the most innovative projects accepted. They are playgrounds for exploration, coming from filmmakers who are absolutely fearless in exploding the themes and neurosis of their own daily lives. And SXSW selects the best of them.   NFS Producer Jon Fusco sat down with a handful of crew members from shorts featured in this year's edition of SXSW, including Drew Maynard and Caleb Dirks from The Saurus, Celine Held and Logan George from Mouse, and Sarah Winshall from Whiskey Fist.   We discussed the different favors, planning efforts, and resources it took for each of these filmmakers to get their short into SXSW. There was one constant in every path, however. No one made a short to get into a midnight section or even a film festival. They all just made stories which they felt needed to be told. The stories also just happen to be bat-shit insane.  
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37 min
March 30, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 3.30.17: Here's Why Hollywood Studios Are Panicking and What it Means For You
In this week's episode, co-hosts Jon Fusco and Emily Buder discuss what's causing major panic in the studio world, why (and how) you should use Facebook to promote your movies, and why it may finally be time to concede to HDR. We also hear from Richard Kelly, writer/director of 'Donnie Darko,' about how his cult classic scared off distributors at Sundance and then flopped at the box office, and Charlie McDowell, director of Netflix's 'The Discovery,' about why he opted for a streaming deal out of Sundance.
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43 min
March 27, 2017
How to Make a Movie Entirely on Your Own
Before "Ramblin Freak'," Tacodeli employee Parker Smith had made only one movie featuring sound. The three three-time film school dropout was stuck between a rock and a hard place after realizing his internship at The Austin Film Society was little more than the theater job he had left in Boulder, Colorado to make a name for himself in Texas. Now, the task of making your first feature is a daunting one. Some would think that filming it entirely alone should make things a hundred times more difficult. For Parker, however, being the only member of his film crew provided him with exactly the freedom necessary to experiment, learn and shoot his movie right. No Film School's Jon Fusco sat down with Smith at SXSW to learn how he pulled off making a movie about a guy who doesn't know how to make a movie. From watching five documentaries a night to finding a producer through Instagram, he provides us with tremendous insight into the art of learning as you go.
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33 min
March 23, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 3.23.17: Has Netflix Replaced Cinema?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder dissect Netflix’s balancing act between the indie and studio worlds, and how indie theater guru Tim League threw down the gauntlet against the streaming giant. We also cover why getting your film graded F could be a good thing, according to IMDB, and a sad goodbye to indie film producer Robin O’Hara (‘Raising Victor Vargas’, ‘Gummo’). We hear from two directors whose films are hitting theaters this month, Alice Lowe of ‘Prevenge’ and Sarah Adina Smith of ‘Buster’s Mal Heart’. Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including an app that lets you shoot in LOG mode on your phone and his review of the new Sigma Cinema Zoom lenses. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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35 min
March 20, 2017
Nick Offerman and 'Infinity Baby' Crew: Being a Script Supervisor is the Best Path to Directing
This week, we’re kicking off our SXSW coverage on a particularly high note. That’s because this interview features arguably the best voice we’ve ever had on the podcast in Nick Offerman, and also one of the best laughs we’ve ever had on the show in actress Trieste Kelly Dunn. They are joined by acclaimed indie director Bob Byington to discuss the creation of Infinity Baby, a film that premiered to uproarious laughter at the festival last week. The film is a convergence of three separate narratives surrounding a corporation that sells a highly unusual product: babies that never age. So while Byington may have made a name for himself with naturalistic movies like 7 Chinese Brothers, the surrealistic elements of Infinity Baby’s plot act as a springboard to the intricate dialogue of screenwriter Onur Tukel and grounded performances from Offerman, Kelly Dunn and the rest of the cast. We talk about how script supervising may be the best training ground for directors, how Nick Offerman overcame being a "sucky actor," and how sometimes if you want to get your break in Hollywood, all you have to do is make sure you have fresh laundry.
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20 min
March 16, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 3.16.17: Why SXSW is the Festival for Fearless Filmmakers
Co-hosts Jon Fusco, Emily Buder, Oakley Anderson-Moore and Liz Nord have been running all over downtown Austin, Texas for the past week to bring you insights from America's coolest film event, the SXSW Film Festival and conference. In this episode, we forego our regular show format to share in-depth festival coverage, from keynotes with the likes of Rogue One director Gareth Edwards and legendary Muppeteer Frank Oz, to interviews with festival award-winners, to the best advice from industry panelists. Of course, we ask the perennial question: What is this festival good for, anyway?
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58 min
March 13, 2017
DP Roundtable: From Brilliant Color to Black and White, Lensing a Sundance Award-Winning Film
In today's episode of The New Film School Podcast, writer Oakley Anderson Moore talks with two DPs. Her guests are Andrew Ackerman, who shot the brilliant, colorful underwater documentary "Chasing Coral," and Ante Cheng who DPed the nuanced black and white narrative Gook, set during the 1992 LA riots. While the style of productions are practically polar opposites of each other, from underwater timelapse nightmares to stylized lighting for black and white, they find common ground in the joy of telling a story through the visual image.
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31 min
March 9, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 3.9.17: Smooth Aperture Moves & How To Get the World Talking About Your Film
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder give the secret to shots that smoothly pan from dark to light and introduce a filmmaker whose work has started a global conversation. We celebrate Women’s History Month with Ava DuVernay’s Twitter takeover. We also get advice from four-time Sundance director Tiffany Shlain. Later, we preview this week’s SXSW Film Festival, tech writer Charles Haine joins us with gear news, including our lens test comparing five different Anamorphics on RED Weapon vs. ARRI Alexa, and Dutch director Martin Koolhoven discusses his new film 'Brimstone'. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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46 min
March 6, 2017
How to Start a Production Company: From Film School to Raising Money Out of Your Bedroom Office
In this episode of the No Film School podcast, Emily Buder sits down with David Ethan Shapiro, CEO of Starlight Studios, and Jacob Schulsinger, editor ("Force Majeure," "Antichrist"), to discuss their Sundance premiere, "Come Swim," Kristen Stewart's experimental short film. We talk the merits of film school and why it's important to recreate that creative atmosphere in your career, the secret to raising money as a producer, why editors should help directors write movies, and more.
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43 min
March 2, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 3.2.17: How To Make Your Actors Cry & Some Last Words From Bill Paxton
In the 50th episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco and Emily Buder share our final conversation with Bill Paxton and advice on getting your actors to tear up on camera. We discuss what the Academy Awards can teach us about producing, along with this year’s indie-oriented results from both the Oscars and the Film Independent Spirit Awards, and how Netflix is already vying for next awards season with a Martin Scorsese pic. We also say goodbye to Seijun Suzuki and hear from director Ry Russo-Young about her film ‘Before I Fall,’ opening in theaters this weekend. Filmmaker and actress Christina Beck joins us for an Ask No Film School about making actors cry. And, as always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. http://nofilmschool.com/2017/03/indie-film-weekly-030217-podcast
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42 min
February 27, 2017
Why VR is Not Filmmaking
In a breakthrough year for virtual reality, No Film School’s Liz Nord sits down with four Sundance filmmakers who learned to get past convention and embrace creating in VR. Each of their fascinating projects are cinematic, but they're certainly not cinema—which didn’t stop them from premiering at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Guests Lily Baldwin of 'Through You', Rose Troche of 'If Not Love', and Yasmin Elayat and Elie Zananiri of 'Zero Days VR' discuss how they brought their groundbreaking stories to life, and which filmmaking rules they had to throw out the window to do so.
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36 min
February 23, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 2.23.17: We Put RED and ARRI Head to Head & What Makes a Film 'Indie,' Anyway?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder weigh in on how "independent film" should be defined, and share results of our big shootout between the Alexa Mini and Epic-W Helium. We also discuss how the inaugural American Independent Film Awards are helping to redefine awards season, how indie cinemas are banding together nationwide for a cause, a surprising way to increase your film’s profitability, and SAG-AFTRA’s wading into political waters. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us for gear news, including our epic (and contentious) shootout between recent two popular cameras, and a new lens from Fujinon that marks the company’s venture into the world of indie film. In Ask No Film School, we advise on why your videos look so different on YouTube than in your editing system, and how to compensate. As always, we also bring you upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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36 min
February 20, 2017
Breaking the Algorithm: How to Make Your Video Stand Out Online
Welcome to the world of modern filmmaking—a place where anyone can make anything at any time and put it online pretty much anywhere. Whether or not people actually watch it? Well, that's a different question. With the democratization of film comes the democratization of exhibitors, and in today's new media landscape, the number of platforms through which a filmmaker can show their work can be overwhelming. In this week's episode of The No Film School Podcast, Producer Jon Fusco sits down with a handful of short filmmakers whose projects have either been funded, licensed, or exhibited by the idiosyncratic video website Super Deluxe. The Super Deluxe platform is one that should be a model for innovative filmmakers looking to get their work noticed. Self-described as "a community of creative weirdos making videos that are (we hope) more substantial than much of what you see on the internet," they are truly a service to filmmakers, providing funding, creative freedom, and, most importantly, trust. Kenneth Gug, Pipus Larsen, and Scott Ross started making Instagram videos and are now Sundance alum with their short doc, Deer Squad. Matt Wolf has been making feature documentaries for years, and Super Deluxe funded his doc short, Bayard & Me, a biography about Civil Rights leader Bayard Washington. Anna Kerrigan was brought on as a director for hire for the web series The Chances, following two deaf friends as they navigate the buzzy scene in Los Angeles. There is no right way to go about getting your project recognized, although it's preferable to have a strategy rather than throwing something online and hoping it catches fire. All of these filmmakers came together at Sundance to discuss their own experience within the oversaturated new media landscape and their strategies in tailoring stories for an era of rabid media consumption.
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28 min
February 16, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 2.16.17: Most Anticipated Cameras of 2017 & How Not to Do a Guerrilla Film Shoot
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco and Emily Buder reveal which cameras shooters are looking to buy this year, and help you avoid on-set arrests. They discuss the dominance of Panasonic's GH5 in indie filmmaker buzz, while ARRI's Alexa rules over the Academy's Sci-Tech Awards and film sets everywhere. The show covers the potential neutering of net neutrality by the new head of America's Federal Communications Commission, and an upcoming indie-helmed Netflix show that's pissing off white people. We also hear from screenwriter Paul Laverty on his BAFTA-winning film, ‘I, Daniel Blake’ and cinematographer Bojan Bazelli on his collaboration with Gore Verbinski for the wild ride that is ‘A Cure for Wellness’. In Ask No Film School, we cover when (and when not) to ask for permission for public shoots, and other tips for outdoor guerrilla filmmaking. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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39 min
February 13, 2017
What It Takes to Get Your Short into Sundance
For all intents and purposes, the Sundance Film Festival is the Holy Grail for many short filmmakers around the world. Need proof? Just take a look at the number of entries to this year's competition: 9,000. It would take an army to sift through that much content. Or at least a highly dedicated and skilled team of programmers. Even with that sort of team in place, it seems like there has to be some element of luck involved with getting into one of the country's most prestigious festivals. In this episode of The No Film School Podcast, producer Jon Fusco and writer Oakley Anderson-Moore conduct a roundtable discussion with crew members from three of the 68 films presented in this year's shorts program. Included in the discussion are Rob Savage, Jed Shepherd and Douglas Cox from Dawn of the Deaf, a sign language zombie movie made with the deaf community in London; Native American filmmaker, Lyle Corbine Jr. who's latest short Shinaab marks his fifteenth film; and Jessica Beshir and Charlie Hoxie, who round out the group with their film Hairat, which details the strange nightly ritual of an Ethiopian man who feeds hyenas by dangling meat from a stick in his mouth. The result is a fascinating dissection of the steps each filmmaker took to find their place at Sundance. You'll find more than a few nuggets of advice in there to aid in your own short filmmaking projects.
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51 min
February 9, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 2.9.17: Risks of Making a Super Bowl Ad & Secrets To Shooting a Perfect Long Take
No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss this year’s crop of filmmaker-helmed Super Bowl spots, and debate whether or not participating in America’s biggest day of ad spending helps aspiring directors. Plus, it’s a bumper week for new lenses, awards season marches on, and we say goodbye to tripod innovator Lino Manfrotto. In Ask No Film School, Charles Haine gives tips on creating a film that appears to be shot in one long take. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at http://nofilmschool.com/2017/02/indie-film-weekly-020917-podcast
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41 min
February 6, 2017
How an Unlikely Yiddish Indie Became A24's First Foreign Language Acquisition
Yiddish is a language developed among the Jewish population of Central Europe in the 9th century as a mix of their Biblical Hebrew, and the German and other modern languages of the day. Before World War II, it was spoken by upwards of 13 million people. Today, in the US, it is estimated to only be spoken by less than 200,000. The scarcity of spoken Yiddish today makes it an especially unusual choice for the script written by American director and native English speaker Joshua Z. Weinstein on his new film “Menashe.” And that wasn’t the only—ahem—unorthodox choice that was made. The movie was filmed with almost all untrained actors from within an insular ultra-orthodox Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn, and the script was developed alongside its star, a man who had never seen a movie in a theater. Perhaps even more surprising is that the feature not only made it into this year’s Sundance Film Festival, but got renowned Executive Producer Chris Columbus on board just before the event, and afterwards landed a deal with A24, which distributed last year’s biggest indie hit, “Moonlight.” Editor-in-Chief Liz Nord met up with Weinstein, along with the film’s cinematographer and co-producer Yoni Brook, and lead actor Menashe Lustig, at Sundance just after the film premiered. They discuss the unique production, camera techniques, and their unlikely success in making a film about a widowed man trying to convince his traditional community that he is capable of caring for his young son.
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32 min
February 2, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 2.2.17: Netflix and Trump Go After The Oscars
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss the Netflix acquisition of Oscar-worthy Mudbound, the highly charged SAG Awards, how the first two weeks of Trump’s term are shaking up the film industry, and which cameras and lenses were most popular among Sundance cinematographers this year. In Ask No Film School, DP Shane King clues us in on cropping 4K footage. As always, we also bring you the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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31 min
January 30, 2017
A Civil War in 'Bushwick': Getting Your Film Made, from Pitch to Production
This week, No Film School producer Jon Fusco sits down with Jonathan Milott and Cary Murnion, co-directors of Bushwick, a film that premiered in Sundance’s Midnight Section. The premise for a Neo-Civil War film in America may have seemed insane a decade ago when Millot and Murnion first came up with it; now, it doesn’t seem so far-fetched. Brittany Snow plays Lucy, a student on her way home to Bushwick while on break from grad school. She gets off the subway only to realize that her Brooklyn neighborhood is under siege from an unknown enemy. Later on in the film, it is revealed that Texas and a handful of other states have seceded from the union and are the force behind the attack. With the help of Stupe, a former marine played by Dave Bautista, they attempt to fight their way through the city to safety. For Millot and Murnion, the road to making Bushwick was paved by a ton of hard work and self-education. Neither went to film school, but through a series of successful short film competitions, they were able to capture the eye of a producer at SXSW. That led to a directing gig on the 2014 horror/comedy Cooties. In this podcast, they discuss the steps they took to win that film and how their process of making a movie evolved once they had one in the can.
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26 min
January 26, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 1.26.17: The Good, The Bad, and The Weird of Sundance 2017
This episode of Indie Film Weekly brings reports from the ground on the movies, the acquisitions, and the suspected Russian hacking of independent cinema's beating heart. Co-hosts Jon Fusco, Emily Buder, Oakley Anderson-Moore Liz Nord have been hitting the snowy sidewalks of Park City, Utah, for the past week, to bring you all the most fascinating stories from America's preeminent independent film event, the Sundance Film Festival. They forego the regular show format to share in-depth Sundance coverage, from the lay of the land, to celebrity run-ins, to the most intriguing films and biggest acquisitions. They also cover one of the strangest occurrences in recent festival memory, a cyberattack on the Sundance online ticketing and admin systems. Finally, we bring news of the other biggest event in the film world this past week, the 2017 Academy Award nominations. Find links to all these stories and more about the craft of filmmaking at nofilmschool.com.
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51 min
January 23, 2017
How to Use Documentary as a Call to Action: The Mobilization Tactics of 'Whose Streets?'
Producer Jon Fusco kicks off The No Film School Podcast's Sundance coverage with an incredibly important (and timely) discussion on how documentary film can be utilized as a powerful call to action. "Whose Streets?" picks up moments after the murder of unarmed black teen Michael Brown at the hands of Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson. Through a harrowing collage of guerrilla-style filmmaking and archival footage, Co-directors Sabaah Foloyan and Damon Davis place us at the epicenter of the Ferguson community as racial tensions in the city reach their boiling point. The directors, however, don’t focus on the forensics reports or harsh statistics associated with institutionalized racism. Instead, they sifted through nearly 400 hours of footage to deliver their message through the pain and heartbreak of the city’s residents. What we get is a stark contrast to a narrative the media presented back in 2014. And while it might be uncomfortable for some, the truth is made clear as we watch the intimate stories of the men and women who rallied together to push through injustice as the protests unfolded. On this episode, activist Brittany Ferrel joins Foloyan and Davis as we dig deep into the potential of documentary film as a tool for change. Regardless of your political affiliation, giving voice to the voices that usually go unheard is an objective every documentarian should seek to achieve.
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36 min
January 19, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 1.19.17: The Sundance Hype is Real & RED Helium's Record-Breaking Sensor
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, we preview the best that Sundance 2017 has to offer, and reveal why RED's Helium 8K is even better than we thought. No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss the biggest festival buzz, and the films and filmmakers we're most excited to cover as we head to Park City, Utah, to bring you news and interviews from the Sundance Film Festival. We also discuss new filmmaker-friendly divisions at Vice and NatGeo, the Cinema Eye Honors results, and the too-short life of the Lily drone. In Ask No Film School, we advise on how to choose your next documentary camera. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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38 min
January 16, 2017
How Filmmakers Can Conquer VR's Biggest Challenges
In the emerging field of virtual reality filmmaking, there are still lots of basic questions about how best to tell a story in VR, which projects even make a worthwhile story in 360, and what conventions from traditional filmmaking that we need to throw right out the window to help pave the way for this medium. On this episode, I speak with some smart people who have been grappling with these questions and made some amazing projects—Ben C. Solomon, video journalist and filmmaker for The New York Times, and Carla Borras, Director of Digital Video at PBS’s long-running documentary series, Frontline. We are joined by Sean Flynn, Program Director of the Points North Institute who invited both Borras and Solomon to the Camden International Film Festival where we spoke, and curated its interactive storytelling lineup. Our guests share their stories and advice from the 360-degree trenches. For more, check out the podcast post at nofimschool.com
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31 min
January 12, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 1.12.17: Why Gear Trade Shows May Be Dying & Kodak Revives a Film Stock Favorite
Co-hosts Jon Fusco, Emily Buder, and Charles Haine discuss Kodak's big reveal at CES—the revival of color reversal film stock Ektachrome—and why trade shows are becoming irrelevant. They also delve into the awards season, which kicked off with Sunday's Golden Globes; George Lucas' new museum; and how to manipulate aperture and light sensitivity. As always, the show also brings news you can use about gear, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, our Ask No Film School segment, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films.
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36 min
January 5, 2017
Indie Film Weekly 1.5.17: A Rough Start for American Filmmakers in 2017 & Full GH5 Specs Revealed
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss how the death of America’s Section 181 filmmaking tax incentive will affect indie filmmakers. We also talk about the NoBudge Film Awards and say a sad goodbye to Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, and TIFF co-founder Bill Marshall. In Ask No Film School, we give some pointers on properly backing up your footage. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to bring the latest gear news, including a CES preview that reveals the full Panasonic GH5 specs, and as always, we update you on upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com. http://nofilmschool.com/2017/01/indie-film-weekly-010517-podcast
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33 min
January 2, 2017
Johannes Nyholm on How to Film Contemporary Surrealism
The Giant is a film that's nearly impossible to pin down. Director Johannes Nyholm describes it as a western, a cheesy sports movie, a drama, a surrealistic fantasy, and a dark comedy all rolled into one. It follows the daily life of an autistic and severely deformed little person named Rikard. His main ambition in life is to win the Scandinavian Championship of pétanque, a European bowling game much like bocce ball. Oh, also, there is a 200 foot giant by his side nearly every step of the way. On this week's episode of The No Film School Podcast, we deconstruct the film's veiled themes, and with the aid of it's Swedish director, piece them back together to reveal how surrealism can weave together a more meaningful message than your average run-of-the-mill drama. Nylholm is a DIY filmmaker through and through, he didn’t go to film school instead teaching himself as many tools as he could through shooting, editing, VFX and animation first for music videos and then his own shorts. He is living proof that, with the correct tools in place, you can create a movie that doesn’t cost much even though it looks like it does.
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26 min
December 29, 2016
Justin Kurzel on Keeping Your Vision and Breaking the Video Game Curse with 'Assassin’s Creed'
This week on The No Film School Podcast, Producer Jon Fusco sits down with Justin Kurzel, director of the new Assassin’s Creed movie. The film is, of course, based on the incredibly popular Ubisoft game series. There has yet to be a video game movie release that one could call "excellent," but it's easy to identify the factors that make these adaptations so challenging to do well.  This would certainly seem to be a higher profile guest then we usually have on the show, but like many other recent blockbuster directors, Mr. Kurzel is a low-budget filmmaker at heart. His two previous movies, The Snowtown Murders and Macbeth, are a few of the more stylized indie action flicks to have come out in recent years.  This same visionary style shines through in Assassin's Creed—whatever unevenness the script presents—making it one of the most enjoyable video game adaptations to date. With an $130 million budget, Assassin’s Creed is a far jump from the $15 million Macbeth, which was already a leap from the $ 2 million spent on The Snowtown Murders. In this conversation, we break down the biggest challenges of making the jump from independent film to blockbuster, where the scale is massive and there are endless voices in your ear throughout production. In the end, Mr. Kurzel insists what’s most important is keeping your vision strong despite all of those voices, and how in doing that himself, he hopes to have broken the dreaded “video game curse."  
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19 min
December 22, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 12.22.16: Best Movies, Cameras & Filmmaker Advice of 2016
This special, year-end episode of Indie Film Weekly reveals the best that 2016 had to offer while you were busy making films. This year was full of outstanding indie releases and gear innovations, and in our final episode of 2016, co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Emily Buder, and Charles Haine share our favorite films. We also unveil top camera choices and review the biggest gear news of the year, namely the launch of Lytro's groundbreaking Cinema Camera. We also discuss our best takeaways from talking to some of the most interesting filmmakers and industry pros on the planet, from Kodak President Steve Bellamy to Gianfranco Rosi, director of Italy's 2017 Foreign Language Oscar contender. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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50 min
December 19, 2016
'A Monster Calls': How to Direct Young Actors to Brilliant Performances
On this week's episode of the No Film School Podcast, we lead a fascinating discussion on how directors can work with young actors to produce astounding performances. Our guests include director J.A. Bayona (The Orphanage, The Impossible), first-time screenwriter Patrick Ness, and 14-year-old Lewis MacDougall, the leading man of A Monster Calls. A Monster Calls, which hits New York and Los Angeles on December 23rd, is not your typical feel-good holiday story. It follows a child as he slips further and further into a fantastical relationship with a tree monster in an attempt to cope with the impending death of his mother. For the actor, screenwriter, and director, the film’s heavy themes posed many questions. How emotionally intense should a screenwriter render a child's role? How does a director encourage a young actor to reach deep into his emotional depths? And what does it take for the actor to get there? It took the efforts of all three to pull the final product off. Here's how they did it.
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23 min
December 15, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 12.15.16: The Best 4K Under $4K & Netflix's Bad Deal
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, we reveal your best budget 4K camera options, and tell a cautionary distribution tale from the indie doc ‘Do Not Resist.’ No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Emily Buder and Charles Haine also discuss The Black List’s annual ranking of the best unproduced screenplays and Emmy Rossum’s “shameless” battle for equal pay on the set of her hit Showtime series, and share clips from our interview with Greig Fraser, DP of the latest Star Wars film, ‘Rogue One’. As always, we update you on the latest gear news, upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com.
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35 min
December 8, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 12.8.16: Steadicam Inventor's Key to Creativity & 'Last Tango' Rape Controversy
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, we hear from one of the greatest influencers of modern cinema, Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown, and give our take on how consent issues might affect your filmmaking. No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, Emily Buder, and Charles Haine also discuss Sundance 2017’s full lineup and the new movie app that has J.J. Abrams, Steven Spielberg and Tyler Perry on board. As always, the show brings our Ask No Film School segment, and we update you on upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com http://nofilmschool.com/2016/12/indie-film-weekly-120816-podcast
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34 min
December 5, 2016
Alice Rohrwacher on Why You Have to Go into the Void to Make Good Movies
Cannes-Winning director Alice Rohrwacher was selected to be this year's prestigious Film Society of Lincoln Center Filmmaker in Residence. Rohrwacher grew up in the Tuscan countryside and never saw a moving image until she was an adult. No Film School's Emily Buder discusses faking her way into her first directing gig, boredom's role in producing creativity, and why we need to go into the void to be great filmmakers.
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44 min
December 1, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 12.1.16: The Secret to a Great Screenplay & Hollywood's Math Problem
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, we ask why movie financiers are ignoring box office numbers, and divulge how math might help you tell the best stories on screen. No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss recent studies on the six emotional arcs of storytelling and the surprising relationship between director age and box office returns, along with the Gotham Independent Film Award winners, and how DJI continues to launch great new drones while GoPro’s drones continue to fall out of the sky. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to bring the latest gear news, and as always, we update you on upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com http://nofilmschool.com/2016/12/indie-film-weekly-120116-podcast
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40 min
November 21, 2016
Write Characters With Room For Actors: Wayne Roberts and Christopher Abbott on 'Katie Says Goodbye'
Katie Says Goodbye is screenwriter/director Wayne Roberts' first feature. Unlike most first features, however, it had its world premiere earlier this year in front of a packed house in the middle of one of the world's biggest film events: Toronto International Film Festival. In the film, Olivia Cooke throws her name into the best actress ring starring as the titular Katie, an ever optimistic diner waitress who doesn't let the harsh realities of her Arizona homestead break her down. Instead, she focuses on earning enough money to finally break out of her trailer park and make a move to San Francisco. Her preferred method in fundraising? Prostitution. Needless to say, this leads to some challenges in her life, especially when she starts dating Bruno, stoically portrayed by Christopher Abbott, a mechanic with a history of grand theft auto. No Film School’s Jon Fusco sat down with Abbott and Roberts to discuss how a writer's work is best achieved by getting rid of any hesitations and letting their characters speak through them.
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17 min
November 17, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 11.17.16: Early Oscar News & Film Budget Fundamentals
This episode of Indie Film Weekly celebrates Jackie Chan's just rewards and helps you get started on creating an indie film budget. Co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder discuss other early Oscar disclosures, the future’s best films as presented at last week’s American Film Market, and cinematic goodbyes to songwriter Leonard Cohen and actor Robert Vaughn. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to bring the latest gear news, including a report from NAB NY and a slew of drone updates from DJI. As always, we also share upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com Post: http://nofilmschool.com/2016/11/indie-film-weekly-111716
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35 min
November 11, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 11.11.16: What a Trump Presidency Means for Filmmakers
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, we break down the potential impact of America’s new government on artists and the press. No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco and Emily Buder also cover an ambitious Election Day documentary-in-the-making and the Cinema Eye Honors and IDA Awards nominees, say goodbye to French cinematographer Raoul Coutard, discuss how YouTube is branching into HDR, and talk about GoPro’s unfortunate recall of its new Karma drone. In the Ask No Film School segment, we advise on the best website builder for filmmakers. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to bring the latest gear news, and we hear an excerpt from Liz’s interview with ‘Arrival’ DP Bradford Young. As always, we update you on upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at www.nofilmschool.com. http://nofilmschool.com/2017/07/indie-film-weekly-111116-podcast
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32 min
November 7, 2016
'The Eagle Huntress': What You Can Expect After Sundance
When No Film School's Liz Nord saw 'The Eagle Huntress' at TIFF this year, she wrote that she may have seen the perfect documentary. It’s got all the elements: incredibly charismatic protagonists, majestic landscapes, underlying social issues, and a classic David and Goliath tale. In this case our "David" is actually a 13-year-old girl named Aisholpan who is determined to learn the dangerous art of hunting game with eagles in the frozen wilderness—and the "Goliath" is the 12-generation-long eagle-hunting tradition that has never, ever allowed a female to participate. Fortunately, Aisholpan's father—a champion eagle hunter himself— agrees to train her, despite objections of the community elders. The story behind the film is almost as dramatic as its subject. Otto Bell's small crew underwent Herculean production efforts to shoot the sweeping film in the mountains of Mongolia. On this podcast, Mr. Bell is joined by producer Stacey Reiss, who came on to shepherd the project to completion when Bell had run entirely out of resources.  They discuss the film's year of post-production and distribution adventures, from running a team of post-production translators in Kazhakstan, to getting EP Daisy Ridley on board just shy of their Sundance premiere, to the workload any filmmaker can expect to take on after your film is in the can.
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32 min
November 3, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 11.3.16: Apple vs. Microsoft - Who Wants Filmmakers More?
In this episode of Indie Film Weekly, we compare the releases of the new Macbook Pro and Microsoft Surface Studio to a high school popularity contest. Outside of the hardware battle for filmmaker allegiance, co-hosts Jon Fusco, Emily Buder and Liz Nord go to the front lines of the Dakota Access oil pipeline protests to find out why police are targeting journalists and shooting down drones. We also discuss the death of Vine, the birth of Kickstarter Live, and, in our Ask No Film School segment, what you should expect to pay for a short film screenplay. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to bring the latest gear news, and as always, we update you on upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. Post: http://nofilmschool.com/2016/11/indie-film-weekly-110316-podcast
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35 min
October 27, 2016
Indie Film Weekly 10.27.16: How Not to Ask Your Actors to Get Naked - A Halloween Spooktacular
In this Halloween episode of Indie Film Weekly, we attack a scary question for many directors: how do I ask my cast to show some skin? No Film School co-hosts Liz Nord, Jon Fusco, and Emily Buder bring you an episode full of spooky surprises, like a visit from everyone’s favorite creepy documentarian, Werner Herzog. We also discuss our favorite horror flicks, a new direction for the series ‘Jessica Jones,’ and how Netflix is taking over Hollywood. Tech writer Charles Haine joins us to bring the latest gear news, and as always, we update you on upcoming grant and festival deadlines, this week’s indie film releases, and other notable things you might have missed while you were busy making films. You can see all the links from this show in this week’s podcast post at nofilmschool.com
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44 min
October 24, 2016
How Directors Joe Wright and Owen Harris Built the Dystopian Worlds of 'Black Mirror’
With an imagination like Charlie Brooker's at your disposal, translating language into imagery is "like butter." If you aren’t familiar with the anthology show, Black Mirror got its start on Great Britain’s Channel 4 way back in 2011. It may best be labeled as “dystopian tech-fi,” in that it deals with technology that exists in our modern world, but could slide into some dark purpose. It's easy to see how society could slip into anyone of the nightmarish scenarios which Brooker creates, and that's what makes the series so effective. After two seasons with Channel 4, Black Mirror would go on to become a sensation in the United States thanks to millions of binge watches on Netflix. So when Channel 4 announced they would no longer be produce the show, it only made sense for Netflix to pick it up and fund a new season themselves. The season premiered on October 21. This episode of the No Film School Podcast is broken up into two parts. The first is an interview with Joe Wright who directed the episode “Nosedive.” Mr. Wright has directed some high budget adaptations including Atonement, Pride & Prejudice, Anna Karenina, and most recently Pan. Among other things, we discussed his transition from big budget picture to streaming TV and actors are the most important tool at your disposal as a filmmaker. Next, Producer Jon Fusco talked with Owen Harris, director of the “San Junipero” episode. No stranger to the series, Mr. Harris also directed the classic Be Right Back episode back in Season 2 about a grieving widow who uses computer software that allows you to "talk" to the deceased. We discussed the differences between directing for anthology and episodic TV and his open collaboration with writer/creator Charlie Brooker.
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23 min
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